Time Code Striping Mini DV Tape

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    • #39595
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hi, I’ve asked in another forum and no one seems to give their mini dv tape a complete recording "time code stripe" before using for a project. I read in a couple of books I read (Adobe Premiere Pro Studio Techniques 1.5 & 2.0) that it’s good to do this. However in other forums they say it’s not good to do so and that it doesn’t make a difference anyways? What would you all say? Not that it matters, but I’m using a Canon HV20 and recording to Sony DVM60PRL mini dv tapes (which I hope is just as good a mini dv tape as the more expensive, less available tapes). Thanks for your input =)

    • #170975
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I sometimes strip the tape. I have mixed feelings about this. While I think its good to set down a base timecode on the tape, it becomes a used tape from that point on. Its been a known secret that brand new (unused) tapes provide the best picture quality than a tape that has been used, I don’t know if this holds true to digital. The only real purpose for striping is to ensure there are no breaks in the timecode. When you start to record your actual content, its going to re-record the timecode anyways.

      One thing I ALWAYS do is fast forward the tape to the end then rewind back to the beginning the day of my shoot. If a tape sits too long, it can bind to itself. Even though it would "unbind" itself during recording, it would snag momentarily causing a slight variation in the tape speed. The recorded content at this moment would reveal digital artifacts, distortion, etc. I never have this issue (anymore).

      In my experience, I have found that camcorder of all types typically backup a few frames when switched from record to pause. This is for 2 reasons. 1) to ensure there are no gaps in the recorded content and 2) to allow the tape to get up to the proper recording speed before it actually starts recording. The only time one would get breaks in the timecode is if they rewound the content to review it and didn’t cue the tape in quite the right spot. If I don’t review the content, I don’t get timecode breaks. Since most of us do review from time to time, its a good idea to record just a bit longer (say 1 second), just to allow proper cueing.

    • #170976
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I don’t have nearly the same amount of work as you. Maybe half a dozen jobs a year. I live in a small city and don’t get much work. Mostly smaller stuff like local bands and weddings. Even then, demand for videographers here is small. Perhaps it is a waste of time but currently I can afford to take that extra step just to be sure.

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