the future of Blu-ray

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    • #44444
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I’m from Japan.

      I’m really curious to know that how often Blu-rays are used in videography business around the world.

      At our company, we’re never asked to give the clients Blu-rays of completed projects. Most of the times, our projects are finally output to DVDs.

      It’s not that we are aggressively offering them the Blu-ray versions anyway…

      Is it only me who thinks the ordinary people care less about High Definition??

      I’m sorry for bad English.

    • #186140
      Avatarbirdcat
      Participant

      I am finding more people asking for BluRay but not nearly as many as want DVD’s.

      My workflow is now all done in 16:9 which can be output to either (widescreen DVD or BD).

      Interesting is a discussion I’ve had with D. Eric Franks on this – He believes medium will be irrelevant shortly as we move to an on-demand delivery model (all video ever produced anywhere viewable on any device).

      At first I argued that people like my parents (in their 80’s) would never buy into this sort of thing (they still have problems with their VCR) but I am starting to change my thinking (my mother now Skype’s using a webcam – whooda think it?).

      Eric may turn out to be very right.

    • #186141

      i agree with eric for what it’s worth. streaming through youtube or netflix satisfies most people. not Blu Ray quality for sure, but “good enough” for most people I talk to. I have an HD TV and love Blu Ray but even Youtube looks good on it most of the time.

    • #186142
      AvatarYvon
      Participant

      Hey,

      When you present your holiday movie on large screen TV a real difference between DVD and B-R color, definition andpicture are more live. The only thing thay stay DVD in life is the low price media but in near future 3D coming so fast at least 5% of prosumer have in hand a 3D camera. Since 6 months only everything change fast.

      Check price on B-R player.

      Regards,

      YR

    • #186143
      AvatarD0n
      Participant

      I prefer to use an Apple tv to view my hd content on big screen….

      as far as I’m concerned, BR will never reach the levels or market saturation DVD had. BlueRays future was history before it even started.

    • #186144
      AvatarWoody
      Participant

      Google, On2 VP8 codec, the WebM project…yada, yada, yada. Add to that HTML5 and mobile sites, yada, yada, yada.

      Media is definately moving away from DVD but where could really be anyones guess for now. Just makes me appreciate the 8-track days even more. πŸ™‚

    • #186145
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thank you very much for replies, everybody!

      Personally, I think physical discs old-fashioned and very hard to handle nowadays.

      It’s not about quality. I don’t listen to music on CDs anymore even though MP3s don’t deliver better quality.

      I really like the idea of delivering videos on non-physical format online.

      In the meantime, we just wait and see…

    • #186146
      AvatarEarlC
      Member

      I do a LOT of event productions where I work once and sell many. NOBODY from ANY of my dance recital, school drama, choral, youth sports, graduation events or other celebrations or productions demand or express an interest or desire in getting their productions via streaming or web distribution. ALL of them WANT that DVD and I’m not about to try and convince them otherwise.

      Video producers who do ONE of something for a single individual … weddings, for example … might benefit from streaming or online distribution at present. I also do hundreds of funerals and/or memorial montages a year and only one since 1994 (six weeks ago for the first time) has EVER asked for streaming or online in lieu of DVD hard copy.

      So, though it might be “old fashioned” or “so 20th Century” I’ll stick with the current demand for DVDs from my client base.

    • #186147
      RockyRocky
      Participant

      DVD’s and BluRay seem to me to be a repetition of a previousscenario played out between the Beta-Cord and VHS video systems. Beta Cord was the technically superior system and used exclusively in TV broadcasting. However it was VHS that won the battle in consumer market place.

      To date, I have never had a request to provide a client with a BluRay disc, its always DVDs. However I have invested in a dual DVD/BluRay burner just in case.

      BluRay were first introduced to the market in 2003 and if they were destined to replace DVDs it should have occurred by now.

      A concern I have with both DVD and BluRay is the natural life of recorded product.

    • #186148
      Avatarcrazzzystoner
      Participant

       I don’t think well see bluray take off and become the next big thing distribution way instead i believe in the future all our content will be distributed to us over the internet. We can instantly stream HD movies over the internet with software like zune, itunes, netflix, hulu, youtube, etc, just imagine the future. In the future we probably won’t even own a hard copy of our media, well access it through the internet. I own a PS3 and have never played a bluray movie, instead I have streamed movies through the PS3 online rental service.  

       

      I use DVD’s and Youtube to distribute my media.

    • #186149
      Avatarmichael9
      Member

      I’m not sure it’s a big issue in that many NLE’s offer BluRay and usb bluray burners don’t cost much now. If the client stipulates bluray then it’s relatively easy to give them a bluray disc and adjust the cost. I see files and remote storage becoming more popular but older mainstream folk who aren’t tech savvy often just want to pop some sort of disc in a player.

    • #186150
      AvatarJaimie
      Participant

      Earl pretty much reflects my situation. I offer BD but nobody wants it. I also offer streaming video as part of a more expensive package. It seems to help sell the upgraded package and costs very little.

      Jaimie

    • #186151
      AvatarKevin
      Participant

       Great conversation thread….

      In our effort to “future proof” our business, we spend a lot of money on technology that MIGHT take off.  DVD is standard, Blu-ray is a nice plus, 3D is a gimmick (a profitable gimick).  It seems to me that the ultimate profiter on 3D is manufacturers.  The benefit to the consumer is minimal.  How many times have I heard the excuse “after the first 5 minutes of oooos and ahhhhs, I forget I’m watching 3D and just enjoy the story.”  My customers don’t want 3D for their wedding vids.

    • #186152
      Avatarartsmith
      Participant

      In our case we simply purchased a Blu-Ray player. With it, I understand, I am able to play material from DVD-discs which fall outside the ‘DVD-standard’; meaning that, for most purposes, I’d be quite happy with my ouput on DVD-discs, but incorporating progressive-scan as an alternative to ‘interlace’. I have a blu-ray reader/writer less than a metre from me as I type this. It has sat there in its box for 13 months, and I have, as yet, only unpacked the ‘manual’ to bring myself up-to-speed with what it is capable of doing. It awaits the arrival of a new up-to-date computer inabout a couple of months time.

      Out there in the wedding/small-scale pro field, I amunaware of any demand for work on Blu-Ray, as opposed to DVD. However, in New Zealand,currently, there are four individuals awaiting extradition to the US for copyright piracy and other misdeeds. Involved with their operation is a considerable amount of ‘cloud’ style storage, which the owners of the data being held, have no access toat the moment, as court proceedings drag-on. For that reason, I am intensely suspiciousof anything ‘on-line’. In my experience, this phenomenon invariably leads to significant extra expense, as is happening withan ever increasing amount of TV content in this country becoming in-effect, ‘pay-to-view’. By keeping everything of mine, ‘in-house’ I avoid all of the hassle and ‘aggro’.

      In any case, broadband in New Zealand is so abysmal, that many won’t contemplate quitting ‘dial-up’ until such times as the situation improves. There is, for example, a significant deterioration in internet performance when the students flock back to Dunedin, (a ‘University’ city), after the summer break. Many times, when downloading, incoming internet activity is down to 20 percent of the time, or less.

      Ian Smith – Dunedin, New Zealand

    • #186153
      AvatarIan
      Participant

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    • #186154
      AvatarHarlin
      Participant

      I feel just the opposite.I love Blu Ray and my clients love it as well. I do 90% Weddings, Most clients will ask for both BD and DVD and then I will get replies a week later saying WOW! what a difference. Part 2, I just learned recently that I can rip a BD recordable that I have created back to my editing timeline and still have H-264 quality ready to make demos, highlight discs etc. try that with a DVD. on another note I hope 3d fades away as quick as it did in the70’s or 80’s whenever it was that they tried to push that weird format on everyone. πŸ™‚

      Im all for online playback and storage but with true 1080P youtube has a ways to go..even on the fastest connection out there. I have an HD demo on there now and have played it on several computers and they allhave issues streaming without hiccups.

      Harry

    • #186155
      AvatarIan
      Participant

       <font color=”#000000″ size=”3″ face=”Times New Roman”>

      </font>

      <p style=”margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;” class=”MsoNormal”><font color=”#000000″ size=”3″ face=”Calibri”>I agree with Weddingmaster Blu Ray is the way to go. Sure
      until the HD-DVD thing was settled and Hollywood movies started to be commonly
      released on Blu Ray, there was a low saturation of Blu Ray players. The extra
      cost to buy the Blu Ray version of a movie didn??t help either. But now that in
      New Zealand at least, the cost difference between Blu Ray and DVD movies is disappearing
      and players are starting to sell at sub NZ$100 the saturation of Blu Ray players
      is increasing.
      Analogue TV is being closed down here and replaced with mainly HD digital TV
      transmissions and large full HD flat panel TVs are selling as quickly as
      McDonald??s hamburgers at the moment. Once HD becomes the norm DVDs will quickly
      become an inferior product.
      For myself, I purchased a Blu Ray burner for my workstation nearly two years
      ago and purchased my first HD camera about the same time. I have recently sold
      my last SD camera and will be completely HD (1080p) from now on.
      The difference in cost for blank media is insignificant compared to the
      production costs so why would you deliver your product on anything else but Blu
      Ray?
      Streaming may be fine but reliable bandwidth is some time away. Maybe Blu Ray
      will be replaced with SD cards or some such standard, but memory and
      replication costs will have to drop a long way to match.
      I think Blu Ray is here for a while yet. </font>

      <font color=”#000000″ size=”3″ face=”Times New Roman”>

      </font>

    • #186156
      Avatarcomposite1
      Member

      Personally, I’m disappointed with Blu-Ray. I actually preferred HDVD as the content creators back then took advantage of its capabilities and you got a lot of material on a disc. With Blu-Ray it’s like was mentioned all they seemed to do was take a large format disc and treat it like a VHS. You barely see any content on them unless you pay an exorbitant amount of money and even then, it’s nothing like you would think. Plus, much of the additional content isn’t HD anyway which is also a gip.

      You can tell they are getting ready to phase it out because blu-ray player prices are falling significantly. There is hype about ‘Violet Ray’ tech, but I’m not excited about it because they aren’t going to do anything different than what they did with blu-ray. I actually prefer DVD over blu-ray as it is less expensive and when they don’t short you on content, the experience is still satisfying. Ever watch the full four disc set of “Kingdom of Heaven” the Director’s cut? I have. Several times….

      I agree though. Everything is headed toward streaming. Right now, pirates have paved the way for how the tech works, content will be seen and get monetized which is why the massive effort to get them out of the picture is underway. Sad though, as hollywood and the big networks already had the means and money to have gotten things going sooner but they were still trying to drag their old models of doing things into the new medium. The just don’t understand that early on, nobody wants to watch ‘stacked ads’ on-line or on their mobile devices. The pirates figured that out a long time ago.

    • #186157
      AvatarD0n
      Participant

      I never bough into blue ray and never regretted it.

      Streaming is the way..and it gets better and easier every year.

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