The crop factor associated with the EOS Canon 7D

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    • #49180
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Im seriously considering purchasing the Eos canon 7D. But I’m concern with the crop factor thats associated with the 7d. From my research this can be an issue depending on the type of lens, because it can hinder the full potential of the lens. Can anyone assist me with a better insight on which would be a better lens for this particular model.

    • #201402
      AvatarRob
      Participant

      It’s not a big deal. No one will look at your video and say, “Oh he was shooting with a cropped sensor” All it means is the image sensor is a bit smaller than the image created by the lens. So if you’re shooting with a 24mm lens, it’ll look more like a 35mm lens. Whatever lens you mount will look a bit longer.

      I believe the crop factor is 1.6, so you just multiply that by the length of your lens, and you’ll know what lens really “looks like”

    • #201403
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks a lot robgrauert for the quick response. I have a good understanding of what the crop factor means now.

    • #201404
      Avatarcomposite1
      Member

      KT,

      Rob nailed it with his description. All the cropping means is you’ll just have to pick out your lenses accordingly to match the angle of view you’re looking for. Like Rob pointed out, ‘nobody’s going to know the difference’. Concentrate on using the available image to its best and you’ll be fine.

    • #201405
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks for your insight on this topic as well KT. This is such a great website for networking on information. But i have another question. Would the cropping be a issue if i were to purchase the canon 5D. Because one of the outstanding features of the 5D is the full frame.

    • #201406
      Avatarcomposite1
      Member

      KT,

      All ‘full-frame’ or ‘cropped’ image means is how much of ‘what you see is what you get’ in your processed image. The 5D has a bigger image frame than the 7D, but what do you plan on doing with it? The 5D is better suited for large projection than the 7D because of the larger frame, but there are things either camera can do better depending on the setting.

      If you’re looking for a camera that can do it all, forget it. Much as I love the Canons, they’ve got issues. However, depending on what I’m doing, I can work around those issues and use them to my advantage when possible. Bottom line is; each camera can do amazing things and the image size is only an issue when it comes to large format projection. Now if you’re planning to go theatrical with your final product, then the 5D will be your boy. If not, the 7D will handle the majority of the workload possible with the 5D.

      They are different cameras with similar capabilities and some features not possessed by the other. Figure out what you’re going to be doing the most work on and pick your poison. If you haven’t seen it already, check out The Great Shootout 2010. They go into pretty good detail as to what the two cameras can and can’t do.

      http://www.zacuto.com/shootout

    • #201407
      Avatartylerknight
      Participant

      I would say if you are able to, get a hold of a Panasonic GH1 or GH2 and hack them to put out 50mbps AVCHD you will be blown away by the quality these little cameras put out. I consider it a close second to the 5d mk2 but much better than the 7d as far as aliasing and moire are concerned. especially good in lowlight

    • #201408
      Avatarninquelote
      Participant

      KT,

      Just a quick addendum to what others have already said. Almost no video cameras have full frame sensors, and they usually come with a stock lens that compensates for that for the most part. If you have been using any other prosumer camera up until this point, I can guarantee it’s had a cropped sensor. The majority of prosumer cameras have 1/3″ sensors that can crop the image worse than the 7D.

      The major advantage, to me, of DSLRs is that they have easily interchangable lenses. If you want a 28mm lens to look like 28mm on a 7D, step back a few feet and reframe the shot. If you can’t step back, buy a wider lens. It’s not always that easy with other traditional video cameras, but that’s one of the big freedoms that DSLRs give you.

    • #201409
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Wow thanks a lot to every one who responded to this forum.Every one who responded to this forum. Has giving me great knowledge and insight on my dilemma. I now have a better understanding of the crop factor. But realize that it can composted. By using different lenses and positioning yourself at different positions from your subject. The bottom line is by using these two facts and understanding the 1.6x crop factor. The full frame and crop issue won’t even matter.Depending on what your shooting of course.

    • #201410

      KT: Having studied many of the great films ever made, and being a still photographer for years (note the Contax RTS3 in the mug shot) with 20-30K slides taken, my issue always was depth of field. This is the creative art of still photography. I was almost anal in getting the right depth of field to achieve maximum effect on the viewer. The precise amount of depth of field is the make it or break it factor between stunning images or also rans. Ya, that critical.

      When you study films you can see the depth of field in almost every scene and surprisingly, over and over again, it is relatively deep – ie, using an f5.6-8-11 on a 50mm lens full frame camera for comparisons. On a cine camera (Arri, Red, Sony f35 etc.) , the sensor is quite a bit smaller than a Canon 5D – more like a bit less than the 7D. To attain similar Hollywood depth of field effects, the 7D is your choice. The 5D is far too shallow at wide open aperture and trust me, it is a bitch to follow focus precisely if there is any quick fore-back movement – try next to impossible unless you have a Marshall monitor with peaking in it and can follow focus fast (it is not easy). And it still doesn’t quite look Hollywood. The work around is to stop the lens down to f8-16 range, but at night, that is defeating the purpose of the large sensor. So, you have to go wide angle – say 28mm f2.8. Too wide, want an 85? Then you are at f2 and the depth of field is about 3″ at 7′.

      Why do you think the 1/3 – 1/2″ chip cameras are so popular with news crews – because focusing is almost a non issue. Everything is in deep focus relatively so. even up close and the distant background. Can be a deal breaker for many creative scenes for movies. Just doesn’t cut it. It is like the Canon 5D 50mm with f45!!

      So, what is your objective? News (small sensor), theatrical movies (7D, maybe 5D size), youtube (small), weddings (large), documentaries (small)? After that – pick your camera for what you want to do with it. Sorry for the rambling on, but I have a Sony Z5 (1/3″) and a 5D (full frame) and have faced these situations over and over again – can be frustrating. But those Reds are sure getting pretty attractive now! (dream on!)

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