Tape Players

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    • #44266
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I’m brand new in the world of video graphing so bear with me please πŸ˜‰

      The number of available tape players does not make it easy to just pick one. The person with zero experience regarding video graphing (me) would too easy make a wrong choice.

      What it suppose to be capable of besides play-back and what to look for? Suggestions?

  • #185423
    AvatarRob
    Participant

    Daruba,

    There are a lot of tape decks out there, but it’s not hard to figure out which one is for you.

    First you need to decide which format you are using. MiniDV tape, HDV tape, Beta SP tape, HDCam, HDCam SR, DVCPro HD, etc. There are many different tape formats, but once you know which format you’re working with, there are only a few decks to choose from.

    Once you know which decks you have to choose from, you need to look for one that is in your price range. MiniDV decks can cost anything from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars while HDCam SR will be around the $100,000 range or more, but I’m assuming you are not recording HDCam SR…just simply making the point that some can be super expensive.

    So anyway, to make your life easier, figure out which format you are recording then decided on a price range. You will only have a few products to choose from.

    The features you want in that deck depend on the format you are recording and what you intend to do in the editing stage. So let us know what format you’re recording.

  • #185424
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks Robert!

    This is what I get if I’m not specific πŸ˜€

    MDV / HDV will be the format.

    Yes I noticed that prices can vary drastically with different formats.

    What are the expectations from a player? What are the “Make sure that you have…” of a player?

  • #185425
    Avatarcomposite1
    Member

    Dick,

    In your other post I recommended the Sony GV-HD700 since you were interested in tape based cameras that handled HD in 1080i and DV format. The ‘Clamshell’ as it’s called is a dual purpose player/recorder and monitor with firewire in/out, HDMI out and Analog Component out connections that will allow you to hook it up to nearly whatever you need. Also it runs on either battery or AC power which is great for field work. It’s a Mini-DV based tape deck and will play standard mini dv or mini hdv tapes. At around $1100 US you’re going to be tapped to find a better piece of gear. The only drawback is if you’re working with 720p HD video you can only watch it on the monitor if you shot it in 30p as it does not support recording in 720p format.

  • #185426
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks Wolfgang!

    It looks like a real nice device considering the price. My God, some extreme prices to be found in that area!

    As you might notice; I’m still doing my research. I do got the feeling that I can’t support all my wishes with my current budget. Right now I confer with the lady about the possibilities to expand my budget till $10,000.00 for I really want to get decent and capable equipment that last me a good while.

    I’m downloaded some manuals from some camcorders see if it is all in my league and to comprehend with my current knowledge. I think (and hope) I will manage just fine.

    Back to the Sony GV-HD700, I think it will be the one to get. Can’t figure out a reason why not.

  • #185427
    Avatarcomposite1
    Member

    Dick,

    Just make sure what ever camera you get shoots 1080i HDV and or 480i DV. The HD700 does not support 1080p nor f like Canon cameras use. It will play 720p tapes only if they were shot at 30p.

  • #185428
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks Wolfgang.

    Yeah, I must first make my final choice on the camera and build my accessories around it. Nothing is final yet.

    If my shopping list is done I will, before I order, post it here to ask you all think it make sense.

  • #185429
    Avatarcomposite1
    Member

    No worries mate. Take your time make your choices. That’s part of the ‘fun’.

    I definitely can’t ‘pea soup’, but I can:

    ‘Clean Sheets’

    ‘Raise Sales and Sails’

    ‘Think Ahead’

    be ‘Overtaxed’

    but it’s much easier to ‘Take Aim’ than ‘Aim to Please’.

    And forget trying to ‘Tuna Fish’ because being in the water has ruined it’s ‘Musical Scales’.

    Ooooh, that last one was really painful.

  • #185430
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    :LOL:

  • #185431
    AvatarSteveMann
    Participant

    You don’t *need* a tape deck right away, just use the camera as a tape deck and capture from it to the PC.

    There, I just saved you $5,000.

    Steve

  • #185432
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Thank you Steve!

    It’s of course a great but temporary solution. If I can afford it I buy one right away, otherwise your solution will do just fine.

  • #185433
    AvatarRob
    Participant

    “You don’t *need* a tape deck right away, just use the camera as a tape deck and capture from it to the PC.”

    Cameras really shouldn’t be used as decks.

  • #185434
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks Rob,

    …Cameras really shouldn’t be used as decks.

    Agree for obvious reasons. It should be only a temporary solution.

  • #185435
    Avatarcomposite1
    Member

    Dick,

    Rob’s right about camera’s shouldn’t be used as decks. Shuttling back and forth during the review and capture process puts 5 to 10 times more wear and tear on the tape heads. When the heads go down, the camera makes for a fine paperweight, doorstop or projectile.

    On the otherhand, I sort of aggree with Steve in that not ‘no’ but ‘hell no’ on spending $5k for a deck these days. Normally indie filmmakers will get a second much cheaper camera to use as a ‘deck cam’ to save their more expensive main unit. The GV-HD700 is a dedicated deck with a built-in monitor bigger than any LCD flip out screen and is smaller than a netbook. Oh and it costs around the same as what you’d pay for a ‘deck cam’.

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