so a Mac it is, but now which one?

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    • #171590
      Avatargum1
      Participant

      I found the recommendations very helpful. As I suspected, most people when asked about systems for editing have answered that a Mac is the way to go. Now one more question:

      if I want a system that will at least allow me to do some high-end editing, can I go with a MacBook Pro, or should I bite the rather expensive bullet and go with the Mac Pro? Does anyone have thoughts? A comparison of systems? I know the Mac Book Pro is great, but am curious about expandablity. Is it too limited to keep up with me as I improve?

      Thanks,
      gabe

    • #39768
      Avatargum1
      Participant

      I am the person asking about the MAC, which kind, Mac Book Pro or Mac Pro. I wanted to add that I am starting to learn FCP, and am eager to break into film editing. I need a system that will allow me to grow with it. Anyone want to give some advice about what kind of system I need (both model and specs),

      Thanks in advance.

    • #171591
      Avatarvideolab
      Participant

      Either are great for editing. The Mac Pro will be faster. No doubt, but as always it is a trade off of portability and speed. If you plan on just doing editing the Macbook is plenty. If you plan on doing motion graphics and 3d the Mac Pro will be faster, but still the Macbook can handle it. I don’t know your situation but if you are going to school or something then definitely go with the Macbook just so you can always have it with you. If you plan on doing all of your editing at home then go with the Mac Pro. They cost about the same depending on how they are configured. Especially if you have a monitor already. If you go with the macbook get the 7200rpm hard drive though.

    • #171592
      Avatarmfederico
      Participant

      I just got the new iMac. Havent gotten my hands on it yet, except for in the store.
      I think I’m going to be very happy with it.

    • #171593
      Avatarbrandon0409
      Participant

      I wish we knew your specific needs for this computer… Professional? Home video? On the go editing?

      Here is my experience.I knew that I’d be spending most of my time editing at home. I went with the Mac Pro. Here is why.

      1. The expandability of the thing is second to none. That was the one key feature I needed.
      2. It can fit up to 3 TB of storage (in 4 or 5 expansion bays SATA/300), if I want to put that in it. And their hot swapable.
      3. It can expand up to 16GB RAM.
      4. And it’s extremely fast. (2 Dual Core 3GHz Xeon processors).

      Here is the thing that I realized really quickly. If you are going to be using this for editing Multiple big projects (like weddings or events), you will need the extra storage capacity capabilities.
      I started out with just one 500GB storage drive (my system drive is for system files only). I now have all of the bays full with 750GB drives (except for the one 500GB, not going to waste it).

      HERE’S A LITTLE SECRET!
      You don’t have to buy the $900 Mac drives that they offer on the MAC website, when you order.
      Get the system drive from MAC then just go to the store and buy the rest. You can probably fill the thing up for the same amount of money you’d spend on a MAC drive.
      As long as you get a SATA/300 drive (I have a tower full of Seagates) you will save ALOT of money. I got a deal at Bestbuy on the 750GB when they were having a sale one week. I got them for $180 a piece. I think the normal price is $220. Still a far cry from the $900 (exaggerating, but not by much)drives on MAC.com

    • #171594
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I’m not sure you understand the concept with the macs. It’s not about specs. you choose between portable (mackbook pro) or desktop (mac pro or imac). With the Imac or mac book pro you need external hard drives, firewire 400 or 800. with the mac pro you need internal hard drives, satas. buy as much storage space as you can afford. (terabyte is good to start). with any system add as much ram as you can (2-4 gigs min).

      that’s really it. buy the computer, max the ram, buy some hard drives. off you go…..have fun.

      for what it’s worth I use an imac (older g5 unit) and a macbook (also an emac, but thats for photo/graphic design stuff).

    • #171595
      Avatarbrandon0409
      Participant

      I would suggest visiting the Mac.com website. I have included the link directly to the MAC pro.

      http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPLE/WebObjects/AppleStore.woa/wa/RSLID?nnmm=browse&mco=80177546&node=home/desktop/mac_pro

      Then just click on Configure it now.

      Understand that the basic specs of the machine are 4 HD bays. And up to 16GB RAM.

      You can choose between:

      – 2GHZ/2.66GHZ/3GHZ – Dual core Board — Or 3GHz Quad Core.
      – Up to 16GB Memory
      – A Raid Card
      – Different types of Video cards
      – DVD writers
      – ETC.

      But like the other posters said. If you are going to be editing movies and film. The MAC Pro is the way to go.
      Like I said before. THe HD bays are hot swapable so you can put in and take out the Storage drives as needed.

      And you will need a lot of storage.

      Hope this helps[/list][/list]

    • #171596
      Avatarvideolab
      Participant

      Like both myself and one of the previous posters said. What it really comes down to is portable or not. If you want it to be portable go with the macbook if you don’t care about portability then go with the mac pro. What ever you do, do not get extra ram and in the case of the Mac Pro extra hard drives from apple. They overcharge on these items to increase their profit margins. Also unless your planning on doing uncompressed HD or 2-4K work really don’t bother with a raid card. It would be a waste of money. It does provide more throughput but it costs an arm and a leg. If you have the money to burn by all means go for it though.

      But when it is all said and done editing does not require all that much power. Color correction and motion graphics do require some power but the Mac Book Pro has plenty for that too. So either system will be plenty for you to "grow with" the mac pro will be much much faster but if you want portability all that power is worthless.

      So it is not a question of what will grow with you it is a question of do you want portability or not.

    • #171597
      Avatarshaynemaglay
      Participant

      I myself have a a mac book pro for on the road editing, but due to the limit on hard drive space, that is all it is good for. I have a few externals for it but it gets tedious to cary them around. I suggest a desk top for serious at home editing with large files. If you have your heart set on a mac book pro though, i say go for it. Hasnt let me down yet.

    • #171598
      Avatargum1
      Participant

      [quote="shaynemaglay"]I myself have a a mac book pro for on the road editing, but due to the limit on hard drive space, that is all it is good for. I have a few externals for it but it gets tedious to cary them around. I suggest a desk top for serious at home editing with large files. If you have your heart set on a mac book pro though, i say go for it. Hasnt let me down yet.[/quote]

      Really, for me the question is one of price. Tha mac pro is about the same as the MAc boook 17 in but I still have to invest in a monitor. Is the Mac Book, aside from the pain of having to cart around the externals, able to handle large projects?

      Lastly, any recs on which externals to go with? Good price, no problems..

      Thanks,
      gabe

    • #171599
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      yes. to be honest my macbook, (not even the mackbook pro) with 2 gigs of ram does just fine. check out Lacie rugged drives firewire for on the road, and I use (middle of the road really, but have a supplier that sells em cheap) western digital mybook drives. My mackbook takes about one hour and twenty minutes to import a one hour hdv tape, (imports sometimes go at 3/4 speed, not a huge problem for me) runs fce. I often record straight to hd, while simultaniously recording to tape…(when possible).

    • #171600
      Avatargum1
      Participant

      [quote=";0)"]yes. to be honest my macbook, (not even the mackbook pro) with 2 gigs of ram does just fine. check out Lacie rugged drives firewire for on the road, and I use (middle of the road really, but have a supplier that sells em cheap) western digital mybook drives. My mackbook takes about one hour and twenty minutes to import a one hour hdv tape, (imports sometimes go at 3/4 speed, not a huge problem for me) runs fce. I often record straight to hd, while simultaniously recording to tape…(when possible).[/quote]

      Lastly, any thoughts about the glossy v. matte screen option that the 17 in MacPro gives? Is HD option really worthwhile on the screen?

      gabe

    • #171601
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      glossy screen looks better under controlled lighting (ie in my studio) and matt looks better under difficult conditions (ie outside).
      I’d think it not wothwhile to pay extra for the matt screen, anywhere you’d need it, you’d probably want some kind of shade over your equipment anyways.

      recording to hd only saves time when editing, rather than shoot, import, edit it goes shoot, edit. i use imovie or quicktime pro to record to hd.

    • #171602
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      One other area to consider. The more processors, the faster the Mac will encode your video projects. That could mean the difference of 1 or more hours. I have a G5 Power Mac with Quad Processors. For a 1 hour finished movie, it takes about 15-20 minutes to export to iDVD and another 20-30 minutes to encode for burning on a DVD. My 5-year old iMac took 1 hour to export to iDVD and 3-4 hours to encode.

      So, if time is important, then get the Mac with 4 or 8 processors.

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