Shutter Speed

Viewing 8 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #49241
      Avatarsomethingclever
      Participant

      I have been using a Canon T2i and occasionally shoot action scenes that are planned to be editing in slow motion. I was just told by a friend that if I film at 60 fps, I need to keep the shutter speed at 120+ to be able to do the slow motion efficiently with good quality. Why is this?

    • #201634
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      My guess would be that with a nice fluid slow motion addon it will better calculate the “missing” frames better if there is less motion blur.

    • #201635
      AvatarCharles
      Participant

      The faster the shutter speed the sharper the slow motion will look and depending on what is happening in the scene 120 fps might be too slow.

    • #201636
      AvatarRob
      Participant

      Even if you weren’t shooting for slo-mo, I wouldn’t go below 1/120th if you’re shooting at 60fps. When shooting 30fps, the shutter is usually 1/60. At 24fps the shutter is 1/48. So it makes sense to shoot at 1/120 when shooting 60fps when you’re shooting for real-time playback.

      For slo-mo, I’d go way faster than 1/120. I’ve shot with the 7D at 1/1250. We were going for a choppy look rather than preppy for slo-mo, but the footage would work well it slowed down with Twixtor or something.

    • #201637
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      Ahhhhh Twixtor is what I was looking for. Loved what the demo could do but still waiting to purchase the full plug-in.

    • #201638
      Avatarsomethingclever
      Participant

      Awe, okay I understand now. Yeah and speaking of Twixtor, I’ve been using Motion for the slo-mo stuff: it analyzes two frames and creates a frame to place in between making a clip capable of super slo-mo. That plus shooting at 1/120 at 60 fps I think I’ll have some cool effects for the next music video I’m shooting haha

    • #201639
      Avatarninquelote
      Participant

      Jacob,

      You want to use a 1/120th shutter at 60fps because that gives you a 180 degree shutter. This is how a film camera works to give the most fluid motion possible. That means that there is an equal amount of time between the frame being exposed and the time in between frames. You basically double whatever your fps is and that give you your shutter speed.

      Now this does not mean that you couldn’t have a 90 degree or 45 degree shutter. Like Rob was saying, that would give you a different look; in this case choppy because your shutter is closed for a longer period of time than it is open.

    • #201640
      Avatarsomethingclever
      Participant

      Justin, thanks for the explanation – I understand the concept more clearly now. I will continue to learn the ins and outs of my camera. Thanks a lot!

    • #201641
      Avatarmacuser88
      Participant

      I just saw a great video comparing twixtor and adobe premier pro’s applications for slowmo:

      http://eduardoangel.com/2011/12/27/how-much-is-slow-mo-worth-twixtor-v s-adobe-premiere-pro-cs5/

      A lot of people are still experiencing problems with twixtor, but once it
      is rendered it looks pretty damn good! Is anyone using other slowmo
      applications that might not be as expensive as twixtor?

Viewing 8 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Best Products

The best lights for video production — 2021

Lighting needs run the gamut, from huge budget productions to small, DIY vloggers, and there’s something for every niche. This article will explain what to think about before buying lights and provide a list of the best video lights currently on the market.
homicide-bootstrap