Second Cameraman Fee?

Viewing 5 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #42754
      AvatarLaughingDuck
      Participant

      How much fee should a hired cameraman for a wedding expect to ask? I might have a job lined up but am afraid of asking for too little or too much..

    • #179171
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      If you get a student filmmaker, they will jump at the chance of $75-100 bucks for the day. More professional videographers might want upwards of $200-400 a day. That’s just what I have seen in my experience.

    • #179172
      AvatarEndeavor
      Participant

      It all depends on how much you are needed and how experienced you are. I have 3 different guys I use and in the beginning they worked for free (to gain experience and also to help me out) but I generally pay them $150 a day now that they are more experienced (plus they’ve worked enough for free that I can’t ask for free work in good conscience anymore). That’s about $18.50 an hour so I think it’s plenty fair considering their obligation ends when we go home. I would never pay as much as $300 or $400 for a camera op. There are many plenty talented people out there that will work for less.

    • #179173
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      One of the good things about "less experienced" camera ops too is that they are more likely to conform to your style of videography rather than bringing their own look the the project. It makes it easier to edit a more cohesive piece.

      I’ll admit, though, that when I was a student, I never worked for free on a wedding shoot. Unless someone really wants to go into that field as their first choice (as opposed to narrative film), you will likely have to pay at least in food to your camera op.

    • #179174
      AvatarLaughingDuck
      Participant

      thanks for your input there guys. I was asked how much I charge and I was not able to answer at the time. So I think maybe $200..that’s 105 British pounds. Should this include the usage of my own camera?

    • #179175
      AvatarAnonymous
      Guest

      I suggest that you start by asking for $100-$150 for the first shoot. If they don’t want to pay you this because they are unsure of your capabilities, ask what they want to pay you then decide whether or not you want the gig. Just remember that no matter what you charge the first time, you can ALWAYS change your rate for future gigs. The only way you’ll be pigeon holed into accepting what you charged this time for future gigs is if you let it happen. You get to choose what you charge….just remember that you are really only worth what you can convince someone to pay. Some people that should only get paid $150 succeed in getting paid $400 and vice versa. However, keep in mind that good work usually results in fair pay.

      As you shoot more gigs and build your confidence and reel, start charging what you feel comfortable charging. I agree that the rate for an experienced second camera should run between $250 to $400 for an entire day. The longer the day, the more you should charge. Just make sure you are giving the person hiring you the best you can offer. I mean work your tail off every second of the wedding. You represent them so do your best to make them look great! Working hard and shooting excellent footage will result in you getting more gigs than you can handle. You could make great money being a second camera operator for a handful of videographers in your market. Then, supplement the income by offering editing services to the same group of editors.

      Good luck!

Viewing 5 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Best Products

Mobile Workstation Buyer's Guide

The best laptops for video editing — 2020

For video editors, finding the perfect portable workstation is like catching a unicorn. It is no easy task to find the perfect balance of performance vs price point.
homicide-bootstrap