Removing Audio Buzz

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    • #46220
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

       I’ve got an audio buzz from an external mic that was not quite plugged into the camera all the way.  Very loud!  I’ve watched the video on this and I see the Audio Effects and have tried a few but don’t know exactly how to find the steady frequency and remove it.  Can anyone tell me the specific steps to find the frequency of the buzz/hum and then HOW to remove it with either a highpass or notch filter???

      Thank You!!

    • #190763
      Avatarvid-e-o-man
      Participant

       Dave, if you would tell us the audio editing software that you are using, I think that someone here would have experience with that software and be able to give specific instructions. Otherwise you will receive general advice that would probably help but wouldn’t be as specific.

    • #190764
      Avatarartsmith
      Participant

      Magix ‘Audio Cleaning Lab’, in any current or recent version, will remove unwanted noise of almost any kind usingspectral sampling techniques. Moreover, it does not even require any great skill, and even better, comes with a ‘Music Editor’, which is a better-than-average audio-editor, as part of the package. The software was, apparently, developed with the needs of those who recover the audio from old cassette tapes, vinyl records and so-on, uppermost in mind. I have used it, for example, to remove the sounds of throbbing diesel motors around seaports, render quite audible the sounds of distant frogs croaking against a background of fairly ‘constant’ noise, and even retrieved the song of a skylark from audio badly affected by wind-noise, although that must be adjusted manually. Any noise which intrudes into an audio-file, and is reasonably constantin level or pitch, is easily dealt with, the only precaution is to have a ‘listen’ to what is about to be removed, at sampling-time, just to make sure that wanted signal is not going down the plug-hole, along with the unwanted component; the old ‘baby out-with-the-bath-water’ thing. If the audio is not hyper-critical, it is even possible to put the ‘dirty’ audio through the process twice, re-using the ‘first’ copy as the basis for the second ‘run’. However, beyond that, the danger of affecting your wanted signal component begins to come under threat, a bit. Of course, for repeating sound-aberrations, such as your hum, you may create a preset of your own, based upon a typical ‘sampling’ and possibly speed things up-a-bit. Sampling, of course, must be made at a point where there is only the unwanted audio able to be sampled. For instance, when cleaning up music, it is necessary to make sure that the sounds of instruments have completely died awayin the sample, otherwise the wanted sounds are diminished in volume, if not quality.

    • #190765
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

       I was trying the settings in Adobe Premiere CS5.5 and I’ve also downloaded FlexiMusic Wave Editor – can’t figure it out.  IF I could identify the frequency of the buzz somehow, I think I can figure out how to set the Notch filter for it, but any specifics would be MOST appreciated.  I used to do a lot of video editing on Premiere 6.5, 2.0, etc., but these new versions have SO many tools and no manual so I’m having to re-learn everything and I don’t dabble in it often enough to retain the learning curve.  I also see the Magix Audio Cleaning Lab recommendation so I’ll grab that and try further.  ANY assistance with specifics on resolving this would be most appreciated!!

      Dave

    • #190766
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive
    • #190767
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

       Ian
      Smith – well, the Magix ‘Audio Cleaning Lab’ $59.99 solution is not going to
      work for me.  This is a one-time video interview of a 90 year old WWII
      veteran for the Veterans History Project through the Library of Congress. 
      I don’t have the funds to invest in this for a one time volunteer
      activity.  He is talking the entire time but the mic buzz is constant so
      if I could just <span style=”font-style: italic; text-decoration: underline;”>identify</span>
      the frequency somehow, I think I can proceed unless someone has a better idea.

      Dave

    • #190768
      AvatarFX1shooter
      Member

      Dave,

      do you have a section with only the buzz?

      if you do you can sample that section and have audition remove it… I’m not currently using CS5. but use cs3 and FCP 7 and use the features all the time to remove fluorescent hum and so on…

      for training you may want to look and Lynda.com

      good luck,

      Robert

    • #190769
      AvatarFX1shooter
      Member

      You can also do it in sound booth…

      have a look at the latest How to video on the home page of videomaker it’s about correcting sound…

      have fun!

      Robert

    • #190770
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

       Thanks Robert – I did watch the latest video on this issue but it doesn’t say HOW to find the frequency.  The buzz is throughout the video and is very constant because it comes from a mic, probably ground issue from not being plugged in all the way.  I can’t redo the interview because of the age of the interviewee – it took a lot of effort to get this one done.  I don’t have Audition or Soundbooth – just Premiere CS5.5 and Encore.  Next???

      Dave

    • #190771
      Avatargldnears
      Member

      So which izzit? . . . a hum, or a buzz? Ya gotta be careful to describe the audio problem accurately. A hum sounds something like when one sez ” mmmmmm “. It’s more sinusoidal, or ” pure tone “in character. A buzz waveform has sharper corners such as triangular, or sawtooth, orsquare; and as such has a harmonic series which extends well up ( higher )beyond the fundamental frequency . . . . and so it’s a lot harder to clean up.

      Just curious – Why didn’t you hear the problem when you began shooting and correct it on the spot? These sort of things are a whole lot easier to prevent than to cure after the fact!

      Rick Crampton

    • #190772
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

       Rick,

      I’m not sure what to call it – it is a constant “noise” like a ground buzz/hum in audio.  The frequency is very tight and if someone can tell me exactly how to identify what the frequency is, I’ll go to work with a notch filter and see if I can kill it.  I didn’t have headphones to connect during the recording so . . . This is a once or twice a month setup in a library using committee equipment so we have to work with what we have.  Sometimes, I remember to bring my own headphones because they have none.  It is what it is . . . .

      I can also send the audio file that I have pulled from the video if someone has the software and time to kill the noise – just let me know where to send it!

      Thanks!

      Dave

    • #190773
      Avatargldnears
      Member

      “The frequency is very tight and if someone can tell me exactly how to identify what the frequency is, I’ll go to work with a notch filter and see if I can kill it.”

      Most of the notch or dip filters I’ve used have a reciprocal ” peaking ” function, which is to say the opposite of a notch or dip. Typically, one would set the circuit to “peak “and slowlysweep the suspected range, looking for an obvious point where the offending noise get obviously louder . . . and then set the circuit to dip. If you can’t identify the frequency ofoffending noise, my guess would be that you have a ” buzz “, a signal witha high series ofovertones; ie, multiple frequencies . . . ever hear the buzz emitted from an SCR lighting dimmer? Such is the toughest noise to eliminate.

      Rick Crampton

    • #190774
      AvatarEarlC
      Member

      Point made, Golden Ears, but this particular need is for potential or possible ways to correct something, not preaching that it should have be avoided.

      Regardless of the oversight in monitoring sound, a very important thing for sure, which is likely something that not happen again, or as often, Dave is seeking a way to possibly address the problem in post, not avoid it this time.

      Your comments regarding hum vs buzz are informative. And thanks on behalf of us all who have bronze or lead ears πŸ˜‰ for pointing out the notch/dip filter aspects. You assume, however, too much understanding of some of the terms specific to audio on my part anyway, and I’d have appreciated a bit more elementary presentation, more definitive instructions.

    • #190775
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

       Eric, you’re READING my mind!!!  I need an elementary presentation and elementary step by step – or someone willing to take the audio file and look at it.  Anybody have a solution I can work on??

      Dave

    • #190776
      AvatarFX1shooter
      Member

      Dave, you may want to download a trial version of soundbooth to see if you can apply one of the built in filters to see if it works for you. It may not let you correct the entire clip…

      You have not answer my question. Do you have a section that you can hear ONLY the buzz or humm? This will help us direct you in the proper direction. As most softwares require you to sample the noise you wish to remove.

      Depending on the size of your audio file I may even offer to do it for you… Ya I know that you are on a low budget….

      This offer will not last long…LOL

      So do you have a section were you only hear the noise (hum or buzz)

    • #190777
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Robert,

      Not that I’m aware of.  Since this is a mic connection issue, the buzz is on the entire soundtrack.  There may be minute instances of no talking where the buzz continues, but I have not isolated any of them.

      Dave

    • #190778
      AvatarFX1shooter
      Member

      Dave,

      If you would like, i can take a stab at removing the buzz for you (just to help acolleague…). i ounce had a similar issue that got resolved by a generous colleague…

      I’m notpromisingthat I will succeed but willing to try. you would simply need to export just the audio into aseparatefile.

      if you are interested send me a message using “PM THIS USER”

      you have nothing to loose…

    • #190779
      AvatarMediaFish
      Participant

      I have used the free version of MP3 Editor – the free version will only create a corrected wav file version of the original but its worth a shot… here’s the link – http://www.mp3-editor.net/ The app has an awesome noise reduction feature. I tested it yesterday creating an audio file similar to what you said about yours having a really bad hum from a mic not being fully plugged in. When I ran it through this app it virtually took out all the hum with about three clicks. I then took the settings MP3 used to remove the hum and went to Adobe Audition and used several filters setting the parameters to the ones MP3 used and got just about the same results except I wasn’t limited to just exporting to a wav file.

      MP3 has a free download you should give it a try and play with it some to see what you can do. If anything you might find another tool for your tool chest.

    • #190780
      Avatargldnears
      Member

      “I need an elementary presentation and elementary step by step “

      Presumably these would be included with chosen software.

      “- or someone willing to take the audio file and look at it. “

      Can you post a20 seconds clip for us to hear?

      ” Anybody have a solution I can work on?? “

      I’d take FX1Shooter up on his/her offer . . . .

      Rick Crampton

    • #190781
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

       Robert,

      The “PM this user”  . . . . goes to nothing.  I can be reached at sedonahomes@cox.net if you want to try that way.

      Jeff – thanks for the information – I’ll use that as Plan B . . .

      Dave

    • #190782
      AvatarFX1shooter
      Member

      Dave,

      I just tried… and you are correct “PM this User” reports an error… did Videomaker remove this feature?

      anyway just sent you a message

      Robert

    • #190783
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

       I don’t know if it’s been suggested, but as for removing specific background buzzing I’ve found that “Camtasia Studio” has a quick and intuitive way to automatically remove a background noise if you can isolate a sample of it. It also has basic manual controls if you want to give it a try. There is a full featured 30 day trial download from Techsmith’s website if you want to try it.

      BTW, you can do it with or without the video but to export only audio you have to select “File – Produce Special’.

    • #190784
      Avatarcfxcorp
      Participant

      These guys DO sound scrubbing — http://www.bias-inc.com/products/soundSoap2/  and it’s on sale now at 20% off if you use this link https://secure.bias-inc.com/store07/store.php 

      Watch the demo video, especially Part 2 and I think you will buy.

    • #190785
      AvatarAnonymous
      Guest

      The MP3 format, re-download

    • #190786
      Avatarvid-e-o-man
      Participant

       Dave, while reding through this thread I thought that I would add a little bit of info that may help. I have used Vegas MS and am now switching to Pro and on this format you can ‘enlarge’ (for want of a better term) the video clip on the timeline. This expands the whole time line, magnifying it and makeing it easier to make fine edits. If your NLE has this feature you could expand this interview and maybe find a short section where the speaker momentarily pauses. This might give you the opportunity to find a short clip which can be used to isolate the noise to use the filters. Hope this helps. I am not an expert on audio so don’t know if this will work.

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