Recording to DVD from VHS

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    • #40017
      AvatarChino
      Participant

      I’d like to make DVD recordings of the many VHS tapes I have. I’ve tried this but the image quality is poor since I’ve lost a generation. I have heard about DVD recorders with time base correction. Is this the way to go? Also, does the Panasonic DMR-E60 DVD recorder have time base correction? I don’t see it mentioned in the instruction book.

      Thanks!

    • #172199
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I don’t see where you are losing a generation. Either capturing direct to a DVD or putting in into you computer & then burning the DVD both record the same signal coming off your VHS tape deck on DVD. Digital video doesn’t have generational loss. But their quality is massively influenced by compression changes.

      The use of a time-base corrector will let you tweak the video signal from the VCR, but it doesn’t improve it. So if you think the video looks better direct from the VCR then it does burned to a DVD, your problem is not the video. Your problem is with your compression. To keep the best quality you absolutely have to burn at the level that puts the least time on each DVD. A DVD can hold 6 hours of video, which is six hours of compressed MPG2 video. You can also set the MPG2 compression so that only a half hour or so of video will fit on the same DVD. Common sense tells you the video compress to six hours in 4.2 gigs is not anywhere near as good looking as even one hour compressed to 4.2 gigs. Look at SP video vs. EP or LP video and you’ll see the same thing happening.

      On the other hand if the video doesn’t look great come out of the VCR, you very likely need your heads cleaned. VCR’s require routine cleaning to remove signal blocking build-ups of oxide on the video heads. But I’m guessing this isn’t your problem, but it wouldn’t be solved by a TBC either

      What are your settings for burning video to your DVD? Are you coming directly from the VCR into your digital capture device? These are the questions that need to be answered first. Then we can offer real advice & guidance. To be honest, I’m concerned you are confused about the relationship between digital & analog video. And I think that is at the heart of your difficulties. Let state once again, while analog video cannot be copied without generational losses, digital video is a file, just like a Word document, and cannot by its very nature be degraded by copying it. But the process of putting video on a DVD requires a certain amount of compression (according to the quality settings and other factors) that frequently degrades the quality of the video signal. It would be like compressing a Word document by removing all the articles, pronouns & uses of the verb “to be.” The resulting, much smaller document would be nearly impossible to read.

      So let me know what your digital recording parameters are. Then we can work towards locating the source of your problem.

    • #172200
      AvatarChino
      Participant

      Thanks for helping! Iam attempting to recording from a JVC HR-S4600U Video Cassette Recorder to a Toshiba RD-XS34SU DVD Recorder. I am using an S Video cable. I was not aware I could adjust the compression of the recording. All I know is that when I burn a DVD from my Sony digital camcorder (mini DV tape), it looks great. When I burn a DVD from a VHS tape, it looks worse than the original VHS tape.

    • #172201
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Boy, it took a while but I finally located the information I needed. It was on page 161 of your Operations Manual. If you don’t know where your copy is, I copied the link to the PDF version on Toshiba’s web site

      http://www.tacp.toshiba.com/tacpassets-images/models/rd-xs34/docs/rd-xs34_om_e.pdf

      Page 161 describes how to adjust your recording settings. You want to set the recording bit-rate to the largest setting, which I think is 9.2. You must also make sure you haven’t accidentally altered your picture record settings. These settings are a likely problem area, assuming the DV signal delivered via Firewire is sent more or less directly to the DVD. But let’s get that bit-rate to the max, the picture record mode set to standard/auto and the input black level set to standard. Make a short recording & see how it turns out. If this doesn’t help, we’ll have to move on to the next possibility.

      Let me know how it goes.

    • #172202
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I actually have the Panasonic DMR-E60 DVD unit. I don’t think it does time correction, but it does copy very well to DVD. I’ve copied a ton of old VHS that I produced and they look just as good as the VHS looks. (not that good) Garbage in… well, you know. I do recommend this unit. Just get that stuff in a digital format before it degrades any more. VHS will do that over time.

      Trey

    • #172203
      AvatarChino
      Participant

      Boy, it took a while but I finally located the information I needed. It was on page 161 of your Operations Manual. If you don’t know where your copy is, I copied the link to the PDF version on Toshiba’s web site http://www.tacp.toshiba.com/tacpassets-images/models/rd-xs34/docs/rd-xs34_om_e.pdf Page 161 describes how to adjust your recording settings. You want to set the recording bit-rate to the largest setting, which I think is 9.2. You must also make sure you haven’t accidentally altered your picture record settings. These settings are a likely problem area, assuming the DV signal delivered via Firewire is sent more or less directly to the DVD. But let’s get that bit-rate to the max, the picture record mode set to standard/auto and the input black level set to standard. Make a short recording & see how it turns out. If this doesn’t help, we’ll have to move on to the next possibility. Let me know how it goes.

      Know what? You rock! The time you spent researching my problem goes beyond the call of duty. Thank you very much!

    • #172204
      AvatarChino
      Participant

      I actually have the Panasonic DMR-E60 DVD unit. I don’t think it does time correction, but it does copy very well to DVD. I’ve copied a ton of old VHS that I produced and they look just as good as the VHS looks. (not that good) Garbage in… well, you know. I do recommend this unit. Just get that stuff in a digital format before it degrades any more. VHS will do that over time. Trey

      Thank you for the info! I know that I need to digitize my video ASAP!

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