Real Estate Videos are Easy

Anonymous (not verified)

I'm surprised that more videographers do not make videos of real estate as a way of earning money.Is it because it is perceived that there is no artistry involved or because there seems to beno market for it? Personally, I think that videos on the Internet are a great way to show and advertise properties for sale or rent, and that videomakers can have a lot of fun and make a lot of money by showing videos of real estate on the Internet.I would venture to say that some good video scenes of a million dollar property on the Internetwould be worth one thousand dollars for a couple of days work. With the hi-definition streaming currently available, anyone with a hi-def video camera can show real estate videos on the Internet practically free.

Of course, money-makingwould have to bethe over-riding interest on the part of real estate videomakers, although artistic talent and video know-how need not be sacrificed in the making of real estate videos. Beyond that, I guess that the only prerequisite formaking real estate videos would be an artistic appreciation forarchitecture, beauty, structure,style and still life. I personally find it artistically challenging to take a still life scene andadd anotherdimension to it by showingit in motion.


EarlC's picture
Last seen: 3 years 7 months ago
Joined: 10/15/2008 - 1:15am

People need to make money. I simply do not see enough qualified video producers being willing to take the time and expend the energy, for pretty muc nothing, to get a full-fledged site on the map. Sorry. Your dream and I certainly wish you well in its pursuit. But a non-monetized effort that appears to have no real bent toward becoming so seems really off the wall and, well, not an intelligent business pursuit.


Brian Alves's picture
Last seen: 4 months 3 weeks ago
Joined: 06/13/2005 - 8:14pm

Quoting Fred Light from this article:

http://www.videomaker.com/article/14254/

"The reason why 95% of videographers don't make any money is that they price themselves out of the market. Realtors don't see the need for real estate video, and they don't want to pay for a tour unless it's under $300. If you're charging $500, $600 or $700 for a real estate video, your customer base will be no one. They won't pay it."


EarlC's picture
Last seen: 3 years 7 months ago
Joined: 10/15/2008 - 1:15am

Vast difference in the profitability, renewability and perceived value between "cheap" (or affordable) and "free" of a production. Likewise, the folks who engage in one or the other, or both.

All of us, at one point or another, do work for nothing, or at a break-even price point. We invest money, time and effort into making dreams come true. Many, if not most, of us have dreams we hope to see come to fruition over time. Sadly, many of us make wrong choices in what we do "for nothing" based on the reality of our dreams or expectations.

Many folks using the internet, dinkering around with the web, trying to "monetize" stuff that for so long was perceived as being a "free" source for tons of information, entertainment and more, are STILL trying to figure out a way to make money at it. Some have succeeded but I'd venture to say the vast majority have not. Many of us are familiar with the successes - Amazon, for example - but a BUNCH of others continue to bleed money on GREAT concepts, high-handed dreams, etc. with the thought that...

...some day...

And, for many that "some day" can and will come, but still likely 10 percent or less of the thousands, even millions of people trying their luck. Some would have better success at a Las Vegas roulette or blackjack table. All I am trying to get focused on here is that it is MAJOR difficult to cross over from a "free" service concept into a profitable one. It is next to impossible to build a perception of value worthy of paying money for when the product has been provided for free for so long. It is in our human nature to put a higher value on something that cost something - even if we're only trying to convince ourselves we made a "good deal."

PT Barnum noted that there's one born every mninute, speaking of people who can be taken to the cleaners with relative ease. The interesting thing is that sometimes individuals take themselves there with no help from the outside.

So, I am certainly an advocate of taking chances, pursuing dreams and even forging ahead and damn the torpedoes. Or, as Jonathan Winters says, if your ship doesn't come in, swim out to it. But there comes a time when reality hopefully sets in and we reallign our thinking and efforts, knowing we have a finite time frame to move from red to black, that time is money.

One last quote, thanks to Kenny Rodgers - you gotta know when to hold 'em, know when to fold 'em, know when to walk away, know when to run.


NashuaVideoTours's picture
Last seen: 8 years 4 months ago
Joined: 07/29/2009 - 10:45am

Real estate videos can be easy. I've been doing it since 2005, it's my full time job and I'm busier now than I've ever been in my life. Some people find it dull, uninteresting, etc., but I personally don't have enough hours in the day for all the work I have on my plate. I'm shooting 8 houses on Friday and Saturday this week - photos and video. At close to $500 each... you figure it out!

What's difficult with real estate video is selling it to realtors - your customers. They don't get it. They don't want to spend the money. Buyers love them. Sellers love them. But your customer? Not so much.

That's the conundrum.

I probably do more real estate video than anyone out there. It's all about marketing and figuring out how to attract the (literally) 5% of realtors who 'get it'. Marketing to the other 95% is a complete and utter waste of time and I don't do it. I decline all invites to speak at real estate offices, exhibit at conventions, etc. I'd rather watch cars rust - you're just talking to yourself!

I let that 5% who 'get it' find ME. I'm a marketer and businessperson first... a videographer second.

Most videographers who attempt to do real estate videos all have the same problem - how to sell it to a customer who 1) doesn't see the value and 2) doesn't want to pay for it. I am contacted on virtually a daily basis from videographers all over the world about real estate video. 99% of them have the same problem: How to sell this to realtors! It's a global problem. It's a real estate industry problem. From Boston to New Zealand - it's the same issue everywhere.

Like most creative businesses, the key to success is how you market your business - not how you create your product. I shoot more real estate videos in a day than most companies shoot in a year - and that's the difference. It's not about the product - it's about the marketing of the product. There's definitely a business model out there. I am finalizing a project right now with a company that will be flying me all over the country to shoot multi-million dollar homes for sale. (that's the side benefit - I've shot about $50M worth of homes in the last four months - you do get inside some unbelievable homes on a daily basis!)

It's an untapped market for the most part - in 4 years I have virtually no competition in my area. But the real key to success isn't about the video (that's the easy part) - it's all about how you market your business.

High definition, narrated real estate video tours


manappraisal's picture
Last seen: 10 years 1 month ago
Joined: 11/11/2007 - 3:35am

Yes, I would believe that real estate video might be a good opportunity. You mentioned marketing, but what type of marketing? Contacting brokerages directly, mail pieces, e-mail blasts? What provides the most efficient marketing for a service that granted, will be utilized by a low proportion of the Realtor community?

Regards


HJB Productions's picture
Last seen: 8 years 4 months ago
Joined: 07/31/2009 - 8:34pm

Do you need a JIB boom or a crane for an areal view of the property? What will be the tools of the trade?

HJB Productions


Tim Trott's picture
Last seen: 4 years 2 months ago
Joined: 08/01/2009 - 5:08pm

Real estate videos are perceived as competing with virtual tours, so that's where the base price has to start. Then, as the product proves itself, you upsell more features. Because there are so many listings on the market, the SELLERS are starting to demand tours from the Realtors and agents in order to stand out in the crowd, whether the agent wants to budget it or not. So the ideal is to create a demand from the customer side whatever way you can (advertising). Quite often when I get a call from a broker it's because the customer "requested" a video or virtual tour. When you add real estate videos to a mix of other production products, rather than as the primary market, they can fill in some of the gaps.

The most useful tool we have for real estate videos is a home-made Figg rig, modeled after one we saw on YouTube, using PVC, two bicycle handles from WalMart, and the quck-release head from a old Vivitar tripod. That, and a $15 monopod.

Tim Trott Productions - Video Does It Better (sm)


EarlC's picture
Last seen: 3 years 7 months ago
Joined: 10/15/2008 - 1:15am

"I'm surprised that more videographers do not make videos of real estate as a way of earning money." John Crawford.

John, you initially started this thread, and have posted similar sentiments elsewhere, but yet you have also indicated that you are doing these for free. How can you justify production of real estate videos as a "way of earning money" when you yourself have apparently not yet found a way to monetize your own efforts?

Others have piped in regarding how to, or not, go about this line of production but mostly the message I'm getting is that it is not a highly prized service, nor very well paid as realtors do not want to spend the fees that would be based on realistic hourly charges for video production service.


EarlC's picture
Last seen: 3 years 7 months ago
Joined: 10/15/2008 - 1:15am

Excellent response, John. Appreciate your efforts, not only for yourself, but in maintaining a professional level of decorum while engaging posts from naysayers such as myself.


NashuaVideoTours's picture
Last seen: 8 years 4 months ago
Joined: 07/29/2009 - 10:45am

In case you're not aware, you might check out WellcomeMat.com - it's basically a YouTube for real estate and a place to hook up videographers with people who are seeking real estate video. There are also very active forums on that site that are specific to real estate videography and many posts regarding the difficulties in selling this concept to Realtors.

High definition, narrated real estate video tours


Patty Kuning's picture
Last seen: 3 years 8 months ago
Joined: 08/05/2009 - 12:43pm
Plus Member

Can someone tell me what size limitation there is on a real estate video that might be posted on the MLS site? I just finished my first, it's 4-1/2 mins long, and I converted it to Flash. It's 20 MB.


Patty Kuning's picture
Last seen: 3 years 8 months ago
Joined: 08/05/2009 - 12:43pm
Plus Member

Thanks John, you have taken a lot of the mystery out of this for me. Much appreciated.


Patty Kuning's picture
Last seen: 3 years 8 months ago
Joined: 08/05/2009 - 12:43pm
Plus Member

Here's a probably really dumb question: How do I post a picture of myself in my profile? For the life of me I can't figure it out . . .


Patty Kuning's picture
Last seen: 3 years 8 months ago
Joined: 08/05/2009 - 12:43pm
Plus Member

Thanks AGAIN! Who would figure that AVATAR was the key.


Patty Kuning's picture
Last seen: 3 years 8 months ago
Joined: 08/05/2009 - 12:43pm
Plus Member

Thanks again John. Like you, I had to retire before I could really dive into this and I'm having a blast.


Evan Patrick's picture
Last seen: 8 years 3 months ago
Joined: 08/20/2009 - 8:05am

Well, I happen to be in the opposite situation, in that I'm starting my career instead of retiring. Coincidentally, I went to Chico State, which is where Videomaker is located. Anyway, I've had a bunch of people suggest making Real Estate Vids. With video production, it's about finding that niche. And this is definitely a market that hasn't been tapped in to. After reading all of these posts, I would definitely agree that it seems a lot of marketing would need to take place to get clients, even if you are offering a low price. I've never bought or sold a house, but I get the impression Realtors are pretty stingy.

I've already invested in HD equipment for weddings, but that stuff is time consuming. Brides insanely undervalue a good HD production until their wedding is over. Then they want a fricken Hollywood production, and its too late. So I've been trying to figure out other ways to make money with HD video.

So here is what I am thinking. It seems pretty easy to shoot and edit a Real Estate video in a day. It's basically just a B-Roll video with music and a couple of titles. If videographers can do same day wedding videos, than I better damn well be able to do a same day real estate video.

So if that goes to plan, I am totally willing to charge 100 bucks. And again, this is just to start out and get the feel of things. After figuring out how to market the product, I could charge more, take on bigger projects, and maybe it will lead some where. But AT WORST, I'd have a ton of quality HD video demo material.

Not that anyone cares, but my two ideal jobs are A) make travel videos, destination video, etc. (Travel Channel) and B) get into buying and selling real estate.

So the whole Video Realestate idea doesn't seem like a bad thing to experiment with for awhile.

Do you guys think I should just go for it, or continue along the HD wedding path?

I'm so lucky to be conscious.