Question Regarding Inkjet Printable DVD’s

Videomaker – Learn video production and editing, camera reviews Forums Technique Editing Question Regarding Inkjet Printable DVD’s

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    • #41561
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I have had a few large runs lately (2@ 100 DVD’s each). I burn them and print them one at a time on my Epson and let them dry before stacking. I use RiData Hub Printable DVD’s and print on the entire surface. I have noticed that the automated systems like the primera bravo print large runs on the same media but it stacks them when it is done. Are the DVD’s built to stack when printed and not transfer ink to the disc on top? Is this only possible with DVD’s that are not hub-printable?

      I would love to hear from a primera (or other disc publisher system) user to hear about the process. I also get a message when I print from edge to edge that I should let it dry for 24 hours before playing it, is there any need for that?

      Thanks for your time.

      Cole

    • #176080
      Avatarralck
      Participant

      I don’t own one of those systems you talk about, but I have a fairly similar workflow to yours.

      I print on Verbatim hub printable discs with my Epson printer. I get great results and have done a few quick tests. The ink seems to dry very rapidly on the disc so it doesn’t rub off on a disc put right on top. However, I still let my discs dry for about 24 hours before stacking them or trying to play them just because I’m paranoid :-P. Actually, since I’m usually putting them into DVD cases, I generally stick them in the DVD case and leave it open over night.

      I’m not positive about this, but I think they recomend you wait 24 hours to guarantee the ink is dry (since they don’t know how humid your area is, etc). If it wasn’t completely dry and you tried to read it, the disc could warm up from spinning and the laser and the ink could get all over the insides of your DVD drive. That’s just my guess- I don’t have any data to back that up.

      So in any case I think you’d be fine stacking them up, but if you’re worried about it, why not just leave them out to try before stacking? It certainly can’t hurt :-P.

    • #176081
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      ralck,

      Thanks for the reply. I think I agree with the slight paranoia of waiting alittle longer. I just happened to read a little bit about the disc publishing all in one units and wondered if I was beingover protective. And most of myprojects go into cases as well. This one however was an order for 100 discs in paper sleeves. I don’t know if youuse any protective coating but I have been using the CD/DVD Guard spray and I love it. Before using it I had a dry disc smear due to wet fingers. I now use this spray and they are water proof. You never know, you may have to tape aquaman’s wedding. Now I am covered. πŸ™‚

      Cole

    • #176082
      Avatarburnsmart
      Participant

      I have used several different CD DVD publisher systems including those from Primera and Microboards. You don’t really have an issue with ink transferring onto discs on top/bottom. However, you need to becareful not to print to close to the center hub. If you set the printer to print to close to the hub, ink gets on the plastic hub and doesn’t dry for a long time. If you start duplication or playing of the discs while the center hub is still wet, you get a “spin art” effect.

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