path to becoming a director

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    • #39589
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hey, guys I been filming for a bit now only a year, and I still have one whole year of high school left after this summer, and I was wondering if there is any professional on this sight who could show me the right path to becoming one. While I am working on my filming I am also working torward becoming a vfx artist on the side just if I dont make it as a director then I could be a digital compositor, I have experience in Shake 4, Eyeon Fusion 5 and a little of Nuke, and working torward Combustion. But as for the path of a director I do not know and could anyone show me the way. Maybe I could upload a Music video I made and you guys could tell me my next step or something. Thanks

    • #170939
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      http://vids.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=vids.individual&videoid=2017564968

      I upload my work at myspace, tell me if you guys can’t access it. I know Myspace is lame and overated but just bare with me here. I also have a documentary (bad quality subtitle hard to read), and other short movie on the side of the music video if you guys want to check it out too.

    • #170940
      AvatarTomScratch
      Participant

      Hi,

      Heres a hodge podge of input for you. Perspective is general but includes big budget level filmmaking. For independent filmmaking (low budgets) made outside of the Hollywood system, things are a lot looser (i.e., anything goes if the time has come for your idea..)

      Become good in as many of the craft, creative, and public relations aspects of the business as you can; you have started to do this so keep it up. Every opportunity to make film should be seriously considered; muliti camera shoots of local dance recitals, participating in the 48 Hour Film Project, moving to a major media center, film school classes, etc. etc. The paths taken to become a director are very diverse. Some big name directors started in local public access TV (e.g., director of The Exorcist); I dont think there is an age limit for working in public access TV, esp if you have work to show. One of my heros, Roger Corman, started out working in the mail room of the studio he later put on the map. Many at your age or younger were passionate about getting to the theater and watching classic movies day in and day out; Martin, Francis, Quentin; and numerous famous British, French, and Italian directors. Access to the classics has become so easy, compared to the way it was for them. (Many DVDs include very informative making-of docs.) You will need to have drive, ambition, and physical stamina as a director, more so than with other roles in filmmaking (run and lift weights?). At the end of the days shoot, directors are the last to leave the set and the first to show up a few hours later for the next days shoot. At the time when you were born, at the Hollywood level, there were basically two paths, one for those inclined to do lights and cameras; and one for those whose focus was on storytelling (scripts) and directing actors. The way the business was set up, those in the first group became Directors of Photography; those in the second, Directors. These roles have stood the test of time although the paths for getting there have become more varied. (However, note that being on a big budget set is like being at the union hall.) A lot of the activity/decisions swirling around the director, and sometimes associated with and performed by young energetic workaholic directors, falls to another key person, the Producer. (Francis Ford Coppolla has said in an interview that Director is the last job in the Western World where it is acceptable to exercise the unlimited unquestioned power of a dictator and he brought up the name of Napoleon; actually, I think he was referring to the combo role of director/producer.) In your spare time, when you are not busy drafting script ideas, shooting or editing video, or watching movies, consider reading books about directors you like. My faves include books about Corman; Norman Jewison (Heat of the Night); and John Frankenheimer (directed original Manchurian Candidate and other classics; was friend of Robert Kennedy and drove with him to fateful rally; cracked up over it; pulled himself together to become an award winning TV director; and did some more great movie work). I dont see much point in reading about what I call underachieving geniuses, such as Orson Welles or Stanley Kubrick. No ones going to let you spend money for ten years for making a movie, unless own the bank, (If looking for poor examples, the later finished projects of Orson Welles is the place to go to see how bad audio can be in the work of a major artist; exception, Touch of Evil.)

      I see that compusolver just came through before me. I think we are sort of saying some of the same things, except that I provide bonus details and asides that are helpful or confusing depending on you POV; and was lazy about using paragraphs. To save on time you can just read his piece. πŸ˜€

      No Time Like Now!

      REGARDS … TOM 8)

    • #170941
      AvatarAnonymous
      Guest

      If you’re serious about making a career in this industry and want to rub elbows with the big boys and girls consider relocating to NYC, LA or San Francisco. Each of these locations has its pros and cons, but getting into any of these markets early as a film school student will give you an edge by building valuable connections and experience. These days you certainly can make a great career outside of those markets, but, if you can afford to live and learn (i.e., tuition) in these big markets, it should be a serious consideration. I’m not speaking from experience, as I took the low road and stayed away from those markets. However, my friends who went to these markets have had a lot more opportunities out of the gate.

    • #170942
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      thats kind of a problem for me, because I can’t aford to live at that expense. I heard schooling and just living there is expensive, and am no rich kid.

    • #170943
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      By the way can you guys critique on my work too, I want to know what I could improve to make it even better, thanks.

    • #170944
      AvatarAnonymous
      Guest

      I don’t want to lead you down the wrong path, but don’t let money keep you away from getting a valuable education in a field that you want to be in. There are affordable solutions in those areas. And as a student there may be scholarships and student loans available to you that can make it happen.

      But, if those markets aren’t a good fit for you than there are definitely other ways to get into a career. I stress getting into higher education at a university or college. Also consider working at a local commercial production facility (check our local broadcasters, cable company and local advertising agencies). They’re always looking for good editors and directors to make 30-sec. spots. It’s fun work and great experience.

      I tried viewing your video on myspace but it would play. In our experience, myspace video is hit and miss. Do you have it up on YouTube?

      Mark

    • #170945
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Alright I’ll upload it right after school. I am at lunch right now, and the school block youtube cause everyone is using it so much.

    • #170946
      AvatarAnonymous
      Guest

      Just be glad you don’t live in China. πŸ˜‰

    • #170947
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      What do you mean?

      I upload the video on you tube here it is:

    • #170948
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks everyone for your advice and thanks compusolver for the compliment, I really appriciate it. Thanks

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