Output files of Multicam editing with Adobe Premiere Pro

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  • This topic has 4 replies, 1 voice, and was last updated 15 years ago by AvatarAnonymous.
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    • #44681
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Quick question for anyone. I have two cams of one event and I want to do switching from one cam to the other when editing the video. Will this produce a third file or will the changes be saved onto one of the previous files? Pretty much, im trying to say is will I end up with two or three files?

    • #187010
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      bai Wrote:

      Quick question for anyone. I have two cams of one event and I want to do switching from one cam to the other when editing the video. Will this produce a third file or will the changes be saved onto one of the previous files? Pretty much, im trying to say is will I end up with two or three files?

      Im not real sure what you mean but maybe this will help. You said you have a 2-camera video of the same event. Im going to assume that you have captured 2 separate DV-AVI files (one from each camera.) These are called Source Files. Adobe Premier Pro cannot change or alter that source file. After you import or capture this AVI source file, PP will borrow or copy the contents of them based on what you tell it to borrow when editing that AVI clip on a timeline. In the case of a two-camera edit, you would probably put camera 1s clip on the first timeline and camera 2s clip on the next line. Then you would need to sync these up so that the timing is right. You would also need to address the audio too. Then its just a mater of editing these two timelines together back and fourth by j-cut editing to get your final edited 2-camera clip.

      Once youre done with that you will need to render that out and then encode or export to either another AVI (or other format) movie file. It is at this time that another file will be generated thus giving you a third file, which is your 2-camera edited version. Your original Source Files are still intact and untouched and just as they were when you captured them.

      RAM

    • #187011
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      thanks. that’s exactly what i was asking about. i haven’t actually started playing around with it yet, but is syncing the video and audio difficult? I haven’t quite figured out how to do this yet.

    • #187012
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      bai Wrote:

      thanks. that’s exactly what i was asking about. i haven’t actually started playing around with it yet, but is syncing the video and audio difficult? I haven’t quite figured out how to do this yet.

      Actually it can be kind of tricky. I just did a two-camera shoot of a high school play about 4 months ago. I pretty much did what I explained earlier and in syncing the two clips together, I went down and used the audio tracks of both camera clips and observed the digital wave signals. If you shot the same event at the same time, the audio signal should be very similar if not exact. Just the volume might be different. You first want to zoom out the timeline a bit so that you can see and match the wave patterns up between the clips. Observe the spacing and so fourth. Of course you just slide one of the clips right or left in attempting to line them up. Once you see that they are somewhat looking the same then you just start zooming in (stretching) the timeline to start fine-tuning the match. Once you think you’re real close you would mute one of the audio lines (lets say from cam 1) and see if the other audio line from (from cam 2) matches up with the video of (cam 1). There you will see if the audio is matches the visual. Youll know if youre off because it will look like an old Japanese movie. By super zooming into the timeline you should be able to get it with in a frame of being dead nuts.

      Once you have it, just make sure you dont slide any of the camera clips and youll be all set. This of course is when undo comes in handy! X-D

      Of course a stupid clapboard would be the real way to go but who wants to haul one of those around. πŸ˜€

      RAM

    • #187013
      Avatarkfox
      Participant

      One note to add. NEVER NEVER NEVER stop any cameras for any reason. OK, the tape will eventually run out, but otherwise shoot simultaneously on ALL cams! Each time a camera stops, you have to re-sync all of the footage. It’s a PAIN to do! Try to roll simultaneously, and NEVER stop, even if you have footage of the ceiling, floor, walking to your new destination (assuming any of the cameras move), or whatever. Skipping over unusable footage is FAR easier than having to re-sync 10 or 12 times. WASTE THE TAPE! It causes less frustration in the long run.

      Of course, this only helps when you are shooting. If the footage is already "in the can", try a Valium (take two, they’re small!)

      Maniac has a good point with the clapboard. It looks "cheesy", "video-geekie", or whatever, but damn does it make lining up shots easy!

      Best,

      kfox

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