Our Young Future Film Makers

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    • #40044
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      A few months ago, i viewed a 1 minute film made by a variety of highschool film students in Brazil. They were prompted with the theme of “my neighbor”. The film competed in the “festival do minuto” (the one minute festival) and won first prize. What really gets me is how these kids, all first time rookies, pick this up so fast. Yesterday, I found a highschool film class, from graded, an american school in brazil, who all make their own movies and show them in their own festival. If you see some of these short films you would be amazed at some of the talent in the festival. You have to remember these are juniors and seniors in an IB film class, rookies in the learning process, and look at all they can do. these kids wrote the scripts, casted the actors, chose the locations, directed and edited this all on their own. One of my favorites is a short made by a student called “Lotto Faith”. It has a catchy name and the story has a great message. The film does have some mistakes, but as a first year student and only 4-5 weekends to shoot it, the kid did a good job. There are some other good ones posted on there you should check out for yourselves, but i leave this question: considering all the talent and interest of this current highschool generation, and their culture, what direction is Future Film making going to take? Also, how much bigger can the film industry get?

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VC4d_0kw5BU here is the link to “Lotto Faith”. It’s a fun little movie.

    • #172270
      AvatarchrisColorado
      Participant

      Huh. Good question. I’m probably part of this “rookies in the learning process” you speak of.

      My second film was my most sucessful movie so far. There was no script. I was sitting outside with my little brothers and sisters. I had a new camera and free editing software with no ideas. We were all bored. I suggested we shoot a movie. I’d get to use my new camera and my siblings could be the actors. We shot the whole movie in one day. I composed the music on my guitar and my Mom’s piano, edited and narrated and shazam! we had a movie. It’s a twist on The Three Little Pigs. It’s been a great hit with my family and even my extended family.

      The only problem is that I used Windows Movie Maker version 1 which has one audio track and no graphics track, and I was still very unused to my camera, so there is not great quality. But there is no movie of mine that has had such a great run. I’m going to be reediting it this summer for festivals.

      Since then, I’ve learned script writing and stuff, been to collegeand my movies have gotten worse and worse…until today. This morning, I did a “Three Little Pigs” again with my brother. No script. It’s gonna be an alien movie with my 3 year old brother saving the world single-handedly. lots of CG and 3d Animation using free software.

      Go “Three Little Pigs” guerilla style filmmaking!!!!!!!!

    • #172271
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Interesting, i emailed the kid who made Lotto Faith, and he gave me feedback similar to what you are describing now. The more he used the script, the worse his shoots were. He shot a few things over again without the script, just a general idea of the lines. Really, the script serves alot as a guideline. When your actors add their own improvised versions of your script, it comes across more naturally on camera.

      He also told me that when he just threw away his lighting plans and storyboards, he was able to become way more productive, not bound to what he had Imagined the ideal shoot would be. He also stated something very true, in relation to the script and storyboards. “The storyboards were horrible for the shoots, because they were just a representation of how i visioned the movie in my head. Thing is, it is impossible to shoot anything the way you imagine it without millions of dollars to back it up.”

    • #172272
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I think that filming from a script is a lot like writing from an outline: for some people. it’s the only way to get things done; for others, it’s creatively limiting. Personally, the more that I outline and have a plan, the more I’m dissatisfied and unable to replicate what I wanted to create.

    • #172273
      AvatarchrisColorado
      Participant

      Yes. Most of my movies that didn’t end up getting made are the ones where I spent tons of time on step outlines, treatments, screenplay and storyboard, location scouting, equipment planning and all the other “preprod. stuff”. I’d do all this work and then our main location would fall through, or the other producers would take the movie in another direction, or whatever. It’s frustrating to do all that work and then have to throw it all in a shoebox and stick it somewhere out of the way in case i need it again.

      Only one film has been attempted a second time, but I ended up redoing the script and storyboard, only to end up making another film anyway. The basic script for this movie is actually one of my best stories and I’d love to see it get made. Take a look at the second version of the script on my website at http://mexenzoaiire.angelfire.com/preprod.html It’s called Hurting A Fly and it’s for sale to any one that wants it. No takers so far. I’ve done the storyboard for you if you want it. Only needs two male actors, if youshoot it exactly to the script and storyboard.

      The script is formatted as a Microsoft Word .doc so if you’re an apple lover, you might be out of luck.

    • #172274
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I would love to hear some insight on the question prompted on my first post there. Anyone share their opinion? don’t be shy.

    • #172275
      AvatarchrisColorado
      Participant

      When I get rich and famous, I will start my own Hollywood here in Denver and hire all the good actors and people from the real Hollywood. Then it might just go away or else there will be two Hollywoods andI will be the head of one. One of the feature films I’m working on is going to hit it big someday, I’m tellin you.

      I’m going to use the internet and maybe all movie theaters will go away. I’m also gonna work on a machine that is a Computer and TV in one, and sell it big. This machine is what everyone will watch my big famous movies on.

    • #172276
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Very nice, where can i purchase this machine? Actually I’d like a free one please. I myself am a Denver resident so no shipping is required. Any one else have a take on the future of film making?

    • #172277
      AvatarBruceMol
      Participant

      Thanks to handmeacamera for posting his observations, comments and questions. It not only got me thinking, but it got me doing as well! Two questions and one observation were posed and as you will no doubt humourously observe, I have numbered them and included them below so you dont have to look for them if you dont want to; yes, Im a list person!I would like to address item 3 regarding scripting and storyboards. I use them and I like them but Im in a position of not having to stick with them. I think its a mistake to say this is an either/or issue. I know no one said either use them or dont but I would like to suggest that storyboarding need not be an entirely physical exercise, it can be virtual as in a vision or concept. Some instances require physical storyboards, others do not. They sure help in a pitch though! I think it is well worth teaching/learning about storyboards and let the video creators decide to what degree they need be used.Item 2: When I read the question, “how much bigger can the film industry get? I thought about the Internet, www, etc. I worked for DEC in the 80s bouncing communications manually from node to node on our network and I thought, this will never catch on. Ease of use. Im also a die hard commuter cyclist and realize there is only one thing from preventing more people from cycling more: Ease of use. There will always be filmmakers would make films even if it was illegal to do so but to grow the film industry ease of use will have to be addressed even more seriously than hard drive cameras, auto iris/focus. Look how many people write in about one software or the other crashing/incompatible. I suspect that most of us, on this forum, reboot start again and get on with it. Were the diehards; some of our shells are harder than others though!Item 3: The future of filmmaking. I took the plunge last October and turned my hobby into a business. That was after months of agonizing, making business and marketing plans. Luck, perseverance and a wife that works has allowed me to break even on equipment expenses. I live in a small town in a big geographical area. There are people who are interested in video but there are no local courses or workshops on creating videos. I suggest that filmmaking is no different from anything else in our society the future depends on the generosity of the present generation. This is why I am thankful to handmeacamera. I had been thinking of promoting a contest and his/her posting was the impetus to get going and help anyone interested in video get a start, get some information and get a-go in! See http://www.bmidd.com/samples/marmots for my first contribution to the future of filmmaking.Handmeacamera wrote:

      1. considering all the talent and interest of this current high school generation, and their culture, what direction is Future Film making going to take?
      2. Also, how much bigger can the film industry get?
      3. The more he [young filmmaker] used the script, the worse his shoots were. He shot a few things over again without the script, just a general idea of the lines. Really, the script serves a lot as a guideline. When your actors add their own improvised versions of your script, it comes across more naturally on camera. He also told me that when he just threw away his lighting plans and storyboards, he was able to become way more productive, not bound to what he had Imagined the ideal shoot would be

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