Newbie with questions

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    • #42878
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hi guys. My name is Shawn and I’m a graphic designer in the Tampa bay area. I’m 27 and really would like to get into video production mainly editing and special efx. I took video classes while in school but it’s been a while since I have done a project. I recently went on an 8 day cruise in which I filmed alot and I’m hoping to put together a DVD. I really want to know is it to late to try to break into video and if not how should get started?

      Thanks in advance.

  • #179535
    AvatarRob
    Participant

    It’s definitely not too late, although I don’t know where to point you to get you going in right direction. If you want to be an editor, make sure you realize that editors do everything these days. The cut the video, fix sound, create graphics, color grading, etc. It’s a lot to learn, but once you learn it you become a valuable asset.

    If you already have a relatively new Mac, I’d suggest getting the Final Cut Studio bundle. Some say it’s expensive, but when you look at what you get and how well it works, it’s worth it. At least I think so. It comes with everything. Final Cut, Soundtrack for editing sound, Color for color grading, Motion for creating graphics, DVD Studio Pro for burning DVDs obviously, and a few other things.

    I’d suggest learning the programs, do some experimenting with them, and when you feel comfortable start doing some freelance work for cheap to try gain experience.

  • #179536
    AvatarchrisColorado
    Participant

    Hey! I think I got in late and I got in when I was 17. I got beat at a film festival by a guy who made his first movie at age 8. I’m getting into graphics/VFX/motion graphics now and knowthe tiniest bit of everything.

    Getting started…now there’s a question. Do you want a job, or do you just want to learn and make stuff? There is a very big difference to me. I recently graduated with a 4.0 in Video/TV production from my local community college and can’t get a job for beans. Most of my 5 short films have flopped badly. I keep at it and I’m now working on my first music video(it should be a big hit, I hope, but then all my movies were supposed to be hits)

    I would say(like Robert Rodriguez,the Hollywood director), skip film school and get out and make movies. Rodriguez says in his book that everyone has a couple bad movies in them and it’s better to get them out as soon as possible. That’s true in my case.

    I would recommend reading Rodriguez’s 10 minute film school(google it or buy his book, “Rebel WithoutA Crew”). It will give you a good start.

    If you would like to learn software(good idea) then learn one of everything: video editor, audio editor, 3d animation, motion graphics, DVD burner.Pick one company and learn all the software it has, like Adobe’s Suites orApple’s Final Cut Studio or Sony Creative Software bundles.It will help getting a job later, if you want one. Getthe free trials off the company’s website and fiddle around, watch tutorial videos, etc.

    Tutorial Video sitesto check out:

    lynda.com (awesome. teaches almost every media software known to man, but you eventually have to pay)

    Adobe TV – tv.adobe.com(if you learn adobe stuff, you gotta go here!)

    I’d also recommend reading Videomaker magazine and “The Art of Video Production” by Leonard Shyles.

    Hope this helps. This is a favorite topic of mine as you can tell. Thanks for asking so I can answer!

  • #179537
    AvatarRob
    Participant

    Yea Chris, I agree about school. I feel like I’m wasting my time. Not only have I long ago exceeded the point I’m at in my curriculum, but I’m progressing faster than my school teaches. I feel in this industry you don’t even need school. There’s so much you can learn on your own and on the internet.

  • #179538
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Yea Chris, I agree about school. I feel like I’m wasting my time. Not only have I long ago exceeded the point I’m at in my curriculum, but I’m progressing faster than my school teaches. I feel in this industry you don’t even need school. There’s so much you can learn on your own and on the internet.

    which is a great thing really, provided you are also good at networking

  • #179539
    AvatarRob
    Participant

    oh yea, definitely gotta network. Even with a degree. It’s all about who you know, but i guess it about what you know when it comes to keeping the job

  • #179540
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks for all the great tips guys. I recently got a macbook pro and I’m going to be using it as my editing comp. I know Premiere and a little bit of Avid and After Effects. I’m going to try to learn Final Cut. I’m in this to try to get a job at some point but I realize that’s a ways off.

  • #179541
    AvatarchrisColorado
    Participant

    which is a great thing really, provided you are also good at networking

    Yes. Networking and contacts are usually big. I ended up with one contact, a guy in my After Effects/motion graphicsclass in college. He knows a lot and we help each other out. I also got a couple of teachers to be job references. But as robgrauertmentioned, you kinda feel like you’re wasting your time. I only did oneyear andby the end of the second semester, I was pretty sick ofgoing to most of my classes. The internet has a lot of good stuff you can watch/learn on your own.

    And college doesn’t teach you everything. Some guys in my class expected to learn everything and when we did the online after effects class, they quit coming, because they needed a teacher. I think that’s kinda pathetic. I taught myself Adobe/Macromedia Flash all by myself between classes, because the computers had it on there. I also investigated Dreamweaver, Combustion, Pro Tools, ACIDand other software.

  • #179542
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    This thread is awesome, there are a lot of good resources coming up.

    If you want to learn After Effects, check out http://www.videocopilot.net/basic/ this series of tutorials by Andrew Kramer will show you all the basics of after effects. When you’re done that, you can check out http://www.videocopilot.net/tutorials.html for his more advanced tutorials. This is a great way to get to know After Effects. If you’re looking for inspiration, you can check out http://vimeo.com and search for something like “Motion Graphics” or really whatever you want. There are all sorts of clips here, a lot of production companies post their demo reels here, companies who work with big clients like MTV and stuff.

    As far as editing software goes, Avid or FCP are the way to go, FCP=easier to learn, Avid=Slightly more powerful, although FCP is rapidly catching up. I don’t know prices for FCP but I do know that Avid has reduced it’s student price to something ridiculous like 150$ which is incredibly cheap.

    Oh, and the best way to learn anything: Watch how the pros do it. See if there is a local community television station that might need some volunteer work. If you’re lucky, you might learn to do studio camera, CG, Floor Producer, Sound, really anything they might need you to do. You will likely be working on Live and Live-To-Tape shows, but there are basics you can learn here that you can apply to other areas. Many producers will be happy to answer any questions you might have, so don’t be shy, and let people know that you really want to learn.

    One last thing. Something I’ve heard time and time again: The key to this industry is humility. So don’t build an ego and you’ll be fine.

    Good Luck!

    Blake

  • #179543
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    One last thing. Something I’ve heard time and time again: The key to this industry is humility. So don’t build an ego and you’ll be fine. Good Luck! Blake

    Absolutely… as evidenced by the site, there’s always a little trick or a little detail that you probably didn’t know before that’s just waiting to be picked up

  • #179544
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Wow I’m so glad I found this place. Thanks for the links and the advice Blake. More than anything I’m willing to learn. I wish I had started earlier but I figured I need experience in my field which is graphic design. After doing it for four years I realize just how much I miss editing. I used to freelance for a law firm editing depositions and making dvds for them. That was so much fun but it ended as it was just freelance. So I’m starting all over again. Thanks again to everyone!

  • #179545
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Wow I’m so glad I found this place. Thanks for the links and the advice Blake. More than anything I’m willing to learn. I wish I had started earlier but I figured I need experience in my field which is graphic design. After doing it for four years I realize just how much I miss editing. I used to freelance for a law firm editing depositions and making dvds for them. That was so much fun but it ended as it was just freelance. So I’m starting all over again. Thanks again to everyone!

    Then it’s not exactly starting over; it’s just building on a foundation that you’ve already put into place.

  • #179546
    Avatarthesunsetman
    Participant

    Hey Guys,

    Pretty neat post with a lot of information, but there is also a lot of information out there to go through to figure out what it is you want to learn and how to put it to use. I suggest you check out my site and bio athttp://www.geniusdv.com/instructors/bob_hunt.php This should be helpful to many of you as not only a possible link to learning everything from video production to editing, but also the forums are awesome. A lot of questions answered by the owner and instructors.

    One thing, It’s never too late to make change, your the only one that can do it, and you are in control of it. So never hesitate to think about change and do it!

    Hope this helps and good luck shooting video!

    Bob

  • #179547
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    http://www.geniusdv.com/instructors/bob_hunt.php This should be helpful to many of you as not only a possible link to learning everything from video production to editing, but also the forums are awesome. A lot of questions answered by the owner and instructors. One thing, It’s never too late to make change, your the only one that can do it, and you are in control of it. So never hesitate to think about change and do it!

    Hey Bob,

    Thanks for the post. And I definitely think you’re right – there’s always plenty of time for a fresh start and to get things moving forward.

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