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    • #43143
      Avatarcfoster
      Participant

      I am looking to buy a Camcorder that will be great for the following:

      1. Recording and posting on youtube and other video sites with great quality.

      2. i will be recording myself in front of a green screen most of the time.

      3. i want to be able to put the video on dvd with a bluray type quality.

      4. i need to be able to hook and external mic to it.

      5. looking for either (Sd,Flash) cards or internal harddrives

      6. Looking for something small to medium… something possibly like i
      see those small independant film companys use like the guys that record
      girls gone wild (LOL) but not to expensive

      all in all i need the camera so i can launch a self help video blog and
      be able to take the video i record and turn it into 1080p high quality
      dvd or bluray.

      Thank you very much for your time in reading this and trying to help me on my quest of finding a camera

      Carl

    • #180789
      AvatarEarlC
      Member

      I am not sure about the mic input but you might start by checking out Pure Digital’s Flip UltraHD http://www.theflip.com especially if you are looking for something in the budget category that still has the potential to deliver what you want. The image quality from this group of cameras is GREAT so long as they aren’t UNDER- or OVER-Lighted, and the quality is best appreciated when they are tripod mounted.

      The UltraHD has built-in 8Gb of memory, uses an included rechargeable battery pack or AAs. It does shoot ONLY in 720p and the data rate is 9.1Mbps. It captures 44.1 kHz stereo. All this info came from the Oct. issue of MacWorld in a multiple-model review of these smaller cameras.

      I could not, however, find something that indicated audio input, so it is likely the camera would be missing this component – and a deal breaker for you if you MUST have the connection for your production needs. In a sound-controlled environment, with the on-camera mic in close proximity, however, it might do – especially for a very affordable $200 purchase price.

      I intend to get one, or two, as backup POV cameras to go along with my soon-to-be purchased pair of Panasonic HMC-150s.

    • #180790
      Avatarcomposite1
      Member

      Cfoster,

      Earl mentioned a pretty good prospect with the ‘Flip’ type of camera particularly for someone just getting started. A couple of big-time reality TV shows are including them in their arsenal so there is more than enough quality there for what you’re looking for.

      You can read the reviews fot both the Flip and the Sony ‘Webbie’ here at Videomaker in the ‘Most Recently Reviewed’ section of the Camcorder Review page.

    • #180791
      Avatarcfoster
      Participant

      Thank you for you responses …i seen that but not sure that is what i am looking for.. i heard great things about it.. maybe posting the thing about youtube threw off the idea of camera… but i was looking for something in the range of HD like 1080p if possible like i heard great things about the Canon and panasonic line something a little more professional … i think the max ill spend is $800… i read a lot of reviews on the mic rode and i will pick one up as soon as i get a camera. i will purchase a green screen and a few spot lights and learn to set them up.. and i will purchase a video editing software later on.

    • #180792
      AvatarXTR-91
      Participant

      Have you considered the Canon HG10 (Full HD 1920x1080i recording, 40 GB hardrive, SD card slot, mic input)? It has a retail value of $1,300, but there are plenty of online selling sites that sell it for around $400.

      http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&hl=en-GB&ie=UTF-8&rlz=1T4GGLJ_en-GBUS309US309&q=Canon+HG10

    • #180793
      Avatarcomposite1
      Member

      “i was looking for something in the range of HD like 1080p… something a little more professional… i think the max ill spend is $800…”

      Cfoster,

      Good luck finding a prosumer HD 1080p capable rig for $800 bucks! Let me know if you do. Not to mention, an $800 camera is not going to produce the kind of quality that will justify the expense of video storage space for 1080p sized clips, the cost of an NLE workstation capable of handling the edits and the cost of blu-ray burners and the price you’re going to need to charge to make a profit on the discs made with your final product.

    • #180794
      Avatarcfoster
      Participant

      by chance is the 1080i part bad ? i heard its better to go “p” because you dont get any line problems.. or does that even matter? i notice canon as being a great camera so ill keep that one in mind for sure… any other recommendations?

    • #180795
      Avatarcfoster
      Participant

      oh i didnt know.. so i assume the best i can do is do a camera like xtr-91 recommended .. good lighting and good editing and i should be good at what i am looking to do especially just recording on a green screen talking business self help and then putting together a dvd with good quality

    • #180796
      Avatarcfoster
      Participant

      http://www.vimeo.com/1394069 here is a concept of what i am looking to do that kind of talking and posting images on the screen like you would see on the news

    • #180797
      Avatarcomposite1
      Member

      Cfoster,

      1080i isn’t bad if your outputting for broadcast TV. In some ways it’s a more detailed image than 1080p but the trend is moving toward progressive scan and away from interlaced video. For DVD and the web progressive scan is the way to go.

      Truthfully, just starting out you might consider getting a good prosumer DV rig like a GL2, XL2 or similar class camera of another brand. It would save you some money and the requirements for editing DV footage aren’t as stringent as HDV or HD. You could still make ‘quality’ DVD’s using the old format. However, the prices for consumer/prosumer HD cameras have fallen and the quality of the imagery has risen, so if you can manage the acquisition of a properly HD spec’d NLE workstation or laptop then HD is also a good option.

      So if you’re not interested in the ‘Flip’ type cameras, then be prepared to spend in the neighborhood of $500 – $1800 for an HD camcorder suitable for your current skills and expected output. I’d steer clear of AVCHD format cameras as the format can be troublesome to edit. BTW, I think I found your ‘$800’ camera. check out the following link;

      http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/597424-REG/Canon_3686B001_VIXIA_HV40_High_Definition.html#specifications

      It’s tape only (SD card is for images), but it should serve your immediate purposes well. It has a full 1080i recording mode and a smaller 1440 x 1080 mode but the specs don’t specify whether that’s interlaced or progressive. You’ll have to go the manufacturer’s website and check the specs.

    • #180798
      AvatarXTR-91
      Participant

      Progressive scan is a “powerful” feature that is supposedly not near as cheap to design into a camcorder’s sensor (or firmware). Having progressive scan may just be one of those gimmicky things that “cost more” to implement into a camcorder, but in reality a feature which the manufaturer toggles via the firmware. Not to say that you shouldn’t buy a camcorder with progressive scan. If it fits in your budget, you should get a good 1080p camcorder.

      I’ve been trying to search for creative ways to modify my camera’s firmware via infrared. I’ve recently been looking for a good site with good shareware or set of “hack codes” for modifying my JVC GZ-MG505 camcorder. They say that it can be done with a LANC port (particularly with certain Sony camcorders)- http://www.dvcentral.org/tricks.html.

    • #180799
      AvatarEarlC
      Member

      Composite – I think I read somewhere that the Canon HV40 is CMOS based sensors, rather than CCD. Would that have any bearing on your recommendation? Of course if he is shooting basically static footage for web production, then the usual CMOS problems are mitigated, I guess. So, I answered my own question, more or less.

      XTR – you’re hitting all around elements of progressive vs interlaced but are not really accurate in your assessment of the two, or the differences in their resulting image production. I don’t know if “powerful” is a term I’d apply to progressive, or if it actually has THAT much to do with the expense/design of a camcorder. It certainly IS NOT “gimmicky” sorry. You’re the first person I’ve ever heard say he wanted to “modify” his camera’s firmware via infrared. Huh? To what advantage would that be?

    • #180800
      Avatarcomposite1
      Member

      Earl,

      You took the words right out of my mouth so to speak. The HV40 is cheap gets a decent image and isn’t too complicated for those getting started to use. If it weren’t for the CMOS movement issue, they’d make great crashcams. I’m also curious about how XTR figures progressive scan is ‘gimmicky’?

    • #180801
      Avatarcfoster
      Participant

      sorry for getting back so late.. i was wondering if i shot in either 24p cinema mode or in 30p… would that look so bad on majority of TVs today.. or even if i shot in the 24mbps avchd.. and used those settings for dvd and web use would that be ok? i do understand that if i am looking for the high quality stuff i would need a red one or pro cam priced in the 1000s i have been looking at alot of these canon lines such as the VIXIA HF S100, HF S11, VIXIA HF20… by chance what do you think of VIXIA HF20 i like on board storage no tapes it has 30p,24cinema,24mbps avchd, not bad reviews and i can pick one up around $700

    • #180802
      Avatarcomposite1
      Member

      Cfoster,

      Dude you’re starting to over-think this. What is it you want to do? If you plan on shooting stuff for broadcast tv or serious DVD distribution a $700 camera isn’t going to get you where you need to be.

      Do you already have clients lined up? If so, what are they asking for? What is your planned distribution format? I do believe it has been mentioned that for standard DVD and web based formats 30p is just fine. Shooting in 24p is a creative choice not a requirement.

      You said you want something that will play well on the web and TV again 30p is your ticket. Leave off the ‘cinema modes’ and ‘digital zooms’ and all of that other junk that comes with consumer cameras. All that stuff gets in the way. Your order of priority for basic shooting is; Recording format, recording framerate, exposure, focus, point at the subject, turn on the recorder and turn it off when you get the shot. Do your best to keep it simple.

      Give AVCHD a wide berth as it is highly compressed and has issues during editing despite many popular nle software being able to handle it. You’re just getting started, don’t make things harder for yourself upfront. I’m also reticent about HDD cameras as a primary rig. Harddrives fail and if anything goes wrong with it, the camera makes a fine paperweight or projectile. Your better options are tape or flash media cards. both are tried and true methods for recording and either media is much easier to download and back up your footage.

    • #180803
      Avatarcfoster
      Participant

      composite you told me just now exactly what i wanted to know.. thank you 30p will work on web and low budget dvd it will only be for a few people lets say when doing small seminars… and when the money starts to come in i will upgrade to better camera… i will also look into flash media camcorders.. thanks a million i will post up later what i come across … thanks again guys

    • #180804
      AvatarXTR-91
      Participant

      EarlC – “XTR – you’re hitting all around elements of progressive vs interlaced but are not really accurate in your assessment of the two”… “It certainly IS NOT ‘gimmicky’ sorry”

      What I meant was the power of sensor it took to create a true progressive image. I was just wondering if manufacturing progressive scan into a camcorder was truly expensive, or is the price just inflated due to people’s demands? It’s definitely worth while to get a camcorder with progressive scan, but for hunderds of dollars extra, I’d stick with the interlaced footage that the camera produces, or use the de-interlacing technique that your camcorder/software has.

      EarlC – “You’re the first person I’ve ever heard say he wanted to ‘modify’ his camera’s firmware via infrared. Huh? To what advantage would that be?”

      Video companies often have the habbit of copying firmware (“computer”) chips and placing them in multiple camcorders. Many of the advantages are “turned off” via infrared (or even USB) on their lower-end models. I’ve been looking around for a secret passage into the firmware of my camcorder for adding any possible hidden features. A good shareware download for doing this would be nice, or even a safe place to find a list of infrared “hack codes”. Maybe even adding or changing hard disk files via USB.

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