Mac or PC??

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    • #39750
      Avatarmfederico
      Participant

      The time has come for all good men to come to the aid of their fellow videographers! I have come to
      the crossroads of making the decision to upgrade. I need a new computer with the intention of some
      better quality editing software. I’ve been using Pinnacle on a PC. Question: Do I keep using PC and get new software or go along with the MAC ads and make the switch? I’ve had such horrible luck with
      viruses, crashes, complete stand stills until my computer guy can give me help/answers.
      Mac is saying that it is nearly or close to not being infected with dreaded viruses. Some I’ve talked to say that anyone in the arts (movies, theater work, etc,) all use Macs. I’ like to hear from any and all of my video pals out there! THanks in advance for your time.

    • #171533
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      VideoNut,
      Be warned… you’re starting a religous war over which platform is best. X-D

      I’ve noticed that most computer media artists who started as artists, then got into computers for the sole purpose of creating art, are using Macs. (I’m using the term "artist" to include graphics artists, animators, and movie makers.) Those who started in the technical side of computers, and then took advantage of their computers to do art things, usually are on PCs (mostly running Windows, but a small number running Linux). The mindset of the PC folk is: Let me build exactly the computer I want, and, oh by the way, save a little money. The mindset of the Mac folk is: Don’t bother me with technical details, I want to spend my time addressing artistic issues.

      So, it sounds like you’ve had your fill of dealing with technical issues…. maybe a Mac is right for you. Just be prepared to spend a little more money, and have not quite as large a selection of software (although I hear Final Cut Pro is excellent, so maybe size of selection won’t be an issue).

      I’m on the PC side, and like the ability to build my own computer with just the right components for what I want to do. I haven’t used Pinnacle. I’m happy with Sony Vegas 7. As far a viruses go, I haven’t been bothered by that, except once on a Mac at work (I know I’ll get flack from the Mac people on that πŸ˜€ ).

      Anyhow, which ever way you go, I’m sure it won’t be a complere distaster. If you stick with a PC, you might want to try a different editor. You can download 30-day trial software for the various Sony Vegas editions.

      Good luck πŸ™‚
      Ken Hull

    • #171534
      AvatarEndeavor
      Participant

      Mac is a more stable OS. PC is cheaper. Final Cut Pro is a great nle. Adobe CS3 is better (and works on mac).

      I would say if you can afford it, get a mac with Adobe CS3. Otherwise, get a PC with Adobe CS3.

      That’s my take.

    • #171535
      Avatarralck
      Participant

      Endeavor Wrote:

      Mac is a more stable OS.

      I don’t think I’ll voice my opinions there. πŸ™‚

      Both gave some great advice. What ever you do, you’ll probably want tp upgrade your NLE. Pinnacle crashes a lot (may be most of your troubles).

      I don’t think we can say absolutely mac or PC. Ultimately, you need to decide that. Go down to the local mac store (or a friend with a mac) and try it out. It’s a lot different than Windows, so you won’t be used to it at first. If you like it, then it could be a good switch. If you don’t, then stick with PC. Both platforms will serve you well with the right TLC.

      And whatever system you go with, get yourself some good virus protection!

    • #171536
      Avatarbrandon0409
      Participant

      Mac vs PC. Hmm that’s toughy.

      I was raised on PCs. When it comes to basic computing, That is what I use.
      When it comes to Video editing, I started out on a PC bt found that no matter what NLE I used, the system eventually crashed, hung, slowed down, or had some quark that became to unbarable.

      When I decided to spend the money and get a full blown Editing system, I finally decided on a MAC, I did not have the time to be dealing with system shutdown and restarts. Having to reinstall and backup everything while I was on a deadline.

      I used Final Cut Pro and it has served me well. I still use the PC for my regular tasks such as webpage design word processing and any other tasks related to video. But when it comes to the editing side, DVD building, After effects… It is all on the MAC which is my devoted computer for it.

      I have had it for nearly 8 months and the system has never hung, lagged, or crashed. It is great!

      Now keep in mind, when I said I decided to spend the money, I wasn’t kidding. My MAC cost me about $4500. SOme serious dough for some serious stability. So if you’re willing to spend the money, I would go with MAC for your editing.

      Just my 2 cents

    • #171537
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Whichever one you like the most.
      They are about the same but the feel is somewhat different.

      I will say don’t fall for the "one is cool and the other is for nerds" BS.

      Computers and software are tools and neither one can do things that the other can’t do.

      What you create with the tools is was it should always be about.
      No one has ever asked me "Gee that’s a nice site and video clip opening… Did you use a Mac or PC?"

    • #171538
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      No one has ever asked me "Gee that’s a nice site and video clip opening… Did you use a Mac or PC?"

      True but they often ask "When will the job be done? How fast can you do it?"

      But when it comes to the editing side, DVD building, After effects… It is all on the MAC which is my devoted computer for it.

      I have had it for nearly 8 months and the system has never hung, lagged, or crashed. It is great!

      True also.

    • #171539
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      "True but they often ask "When will the job be done? How fast can you do it?"

      And "How much will it cost?" 8)

    • #171540
      AvatarFreeworldIcon
      Participant

      Endeavor Wrote:

      Mac is a more stable OS. PC is cheaper. Final Cut Pro is a great nle. Adobe CS3 is better (and works on mac).

      I would say if you can afford it, get a mac with Adobe CS3. Otherwise, get a PC with Adobe CS3.

      That’s my take.

      I would get a new Mac and Dual boot it with windows xp and get final cut and adobe premiere pro 2, cs3 is just to expensive to waste your money, even though i have it!! πŸ˜‰

    • #171541
      AvatarAlainstamour
      Participant

      Mac.

      I have lived on PCs’ since the early nineties so I’m quite familiar with them. I purchased my very first Mac about a year ago and I would never, ever, in a million years return to a PC. NEVER.

      And you don’t need to spend $4500 on a Mac. You can get the brand new iMac for approx $1200 US.

      This isn’t a Ford vs Chevy debate. It’s Rolls Royce vs a golf cart.

      Mac.

    • #171542
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      How about my Amiga?

    • #171543
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      So if you were to fit the Amiga into this cars theme, maybe the Amiga would be the Duesenberg of its day?
      No, wait!!! I’ve got it!!! The Amiga would be ……the Tucker Torpedo? πŸ˜€
      Ken Hull

    • #171544
      AvatarRyan3078
      Participant

      And you don’t need to spend $4500 on a Mac. You can get the brand new iMac for approx $1200 US.

      This isn’t a Ford vs Chevy debate. It’s Rolls Royce vs a golf cart.

      You can get a PC that has at least as good a performance as the iMac for hundreds less. I know from experience, my school’s art room has 30 new iMacs. My $600 PC outperforms them.

      So in my opinion it’s more of a "do you want a pretty computer with limited customization", or "would you like a PC that can be pretty, can naturally do a wider variety of things, and is much more customizable and also in many aspects cheaper."

      Go Mac if it’s only art and prettiness you want.

      Go PC if you will want to do other things besides art, and if you want many more options.

    • #171545
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      "True but they often ask "When will the job be done? How fast can you do it?"

      And "How much will it cost?"

      You can get a PC that has at least as good a performance as the iMac for hundreds less. I know from experience, my school’s art room has 30 new iMacs. My $600 PC outperforms them.

      So in my opinion it’s more of a "do you want a pretty computer with limited customization", or "would you like a PC that can be pretty, can naturally do a wider variety of things, and is much more customizable and also in many aspects cheaper."

      Go Mac if it’s only art and prettiness you want.

      Go PC if you will want to do other things besides art, and if you want many more options.

      by that logic, you can get a web cam for $30.00 that does wayyyyy more than your sony/panisonic/jvc for onehundreth the price.
      it can do surveilence, video chat, motion sensor as well as record directly to pc, and allow you to offer video services for a fraction of the cost of those idiots that bought "Pro" cameras.

    • #171546
      Avatarjetson
      Participant

      The price of macs is directly compatible with PC now. They just don’t really offer a "low end" mac per se. I’ve done quite a few Dell configurations through their online store and when you match specs exactly, the Dell is always higher (including the monitor specs.) I know you can build a PC yourself using parts from various vendors etc, and get it done cheaper – but that type of setup is usually reserved for the tech savvy.

      The thing I’m now enjoying about the mac is that you can easily install Windows and either dual-boot, or run it within the mac OS – so you can have both platforms on one machine. Some people are hoping that you will soon be able to install Mac OSX on a vanilla windows box, but that doesn’t seem likely so far.

      I’ll tell my short story of why I switched to mac for video. I had a powerful (at the time) Dell tower, and I went and purchased a firewire card, which came with the Adboe editing software. Try as I did, there was always something that went wrong on the video capture, or when I had the footage and tried to edit it etc. So on a whim, I connected my camera to my wife’s iBook, which ha iMovie pre-installed, and voila! It captured all of my footage without a single hiccup, and then I wrote the edited video back to a clean tape! That’s all I needed to drop Windows and switch to mac.

      I know that editing video on Windows has been greatly improved since back in late 1999, early 2000, but that one experience alone made me switch permanently. And luckily for me, I’m not a gamer, nor do I need any special "windows only" software.

      I doubt you can go wrong no matter what you decide. Good luck!

    • #171547
      Avatarmfederico
      Participant

      Thanks to all who responded! Your input has been tremendously helpful!
      Some things I have heard before and many other issues I was unaware of!
      You are all a wonderful support system, and thanks to VM Mag for this forum.
      Happy ediiting, All!

    • #171548
      AvatarKevinShaw
      Participant

      jetson Wrote:

      The price of macs is directly compatible with PC now. They just don’t really offer a "low end" mac per se.

      As you said, the price is about the same for identical configurations – but Apple gives you few hardware options and hence few ways to hold the price down by leaving out things you don’t need. That said, the option to run both the Mac OS and Windows well on one computer is a pretty compelling reason to consider buying a Mac. Lots of people are doing fine video work on PCs too, so it’s hard to go wrong these days so long as you buy well-known hardware and software.

    • #171549
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Kevin Shaw Wrote:

      Lots of people are doing fine video work on PCs too, so it’s hard to go wrong these days so long as you buy well-known hardware and software.

      It’s also very easy to go wrong. As you point out, many people are doing fine video work on all sorts of platforms. There are also people who do crappy video work on all platforms.
      Remember: The tools don’t make your videos great, they allow you to make your great video — You are the one making the video, not the machine, it’s just a tool.

    • #171550
      AvatarDaveArthur
      Participant

      Why I Chose The Macintosh Computer Platform For My Video Business
      And Why You Shouldnt Feel Badly If You Didnt

      This is part of an article I recently wrote for another site. I thought it might be of use here.

      In the old days, the battle over Windows vs. Macintosh caused more than a few heated discussions. Mac users are a dedicated bunch, eager to defend the operating system that they so fondly identified with. Windows users took offense to the suggestion that their computers were nerdy by comparison to the sleek industrial designs and svelte interfaces that Apple is famous for. The battle may continue on some distant fronts, but it seems to me that developments of the last couple of years have pretty much rendered the argument moot. That is, of course, aside from the land of silly television commercials.

      First, Apple is no longer a struggling little company with a quaint machine only used by a few die hards. The iPhone, iPod, iTelevision, iTunes, and iMac–all astounding commercial successes, have pushed Apple profits into the stratosphere. (I still fume at my stock broker for talking me out of buying Apple stock three years ago. Overvalued my Irish butt!) Apple is unlikely to whither into oblivion any time soon.

      Second, Steve Jobs made the widely unexpected decision to move to Intel chipsets for Macintosh hardware. The result has been that Macs have become the Swiss Army Knives of the computing world, deftly running Macintosh OSX, Windows, Unix, or Linux. Multiple operating systems can be run on one machine, often simultaneously. Even the most ardent Mac-hater should have a rough time arguing about a machine that can do all that.

      Third, the long standing Apple premium in their computer pricing structure has all but vanished. When comparing Apples to apples, pricing for like-machines is nearly equal. Today, the price spread is mostly the result of Apples decision not to manufacture very low-end, stripped down, machines. Even the most basic Mac is still a fairly good performer.

      Okay, with all that said, here is a brief list of my reasons for using Mac equipment in my video production studio:

      * Final Cut Express – This $300 mid-level video editing suite is powerful beyond compare and uses editing conventions that easily transfer to higher end solutions. In the production world, this is quite the bargain.
      *Final Cut Pro – The newest rendition of this suite is a true powerhouse. This program is used to post a lot of the television broadcast in the US today and an even larger percentage of the motion pictures we see at the local Cineplex. And if you can operate Final Cut Express, the learning curve for Pro is no big deal.
      *iDVD – This slick little DVD authoring tool comes free with all Macs as part of the iLife digital media suite. It is easy to use, efficient, the results look fantastic, and the program is filled with many pro-level features.
      *Stability – Windows XP is a fine program and is easily the most stable OS that Microsoft has ever come up with, yet Macintosh OSX still beats it hands-down for reliability.
      *Windows Vista – It is approaching a year since the release of Microsofts new baby and the program is improving every day. Still, this system is a mess. Most video editing programs still will not run reliably on it, and currently no editing systems run with adequate speed on Vista.
      *Applecare – Applecare is the Apple three year extended warranty and service contract available for all of their hardware. In my view, this is the best value in computing. When a problem arises, and it will, the Texas-based tech support at Apple is there to bail you out. Every Applecare call I have made in the last fifteen years has been a positive experience. In contrast, I called HP a couple of months back. After two hours and fifteen minutes of listening to a recording that told me over and over how dedicated HP is to customer service, and without ever talking to a human, I gave up.

      On the plus side for Windows machines, Windows XP is still available. Sony Vegas is a great and very capable editing suite, Camtasia is a great tool for making tech-related videos, and many Windows machines are infinitely modifiable and expandable, something that can be claimed by only the highest-end Apples.

      In the end for me, Apple equipment equals the most options and the most up time for my business. My decision may cost a little more in the near term, but what I save in time and frustration means that I come out way ahead. But thats me. If you are a comfortable Windows user and have an editing solution that you are comfortable with, then you have made the decisions right for you. The lines between the computer camps have blurred. Pick the tool that fits you and your needs the best.

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