Lighting Problem

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    • #42201
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Went to a friends symphonic concert and had a problem with the recording. I had film from the balcony, but the theater isnt that big. i had it zoomed out so that i could get the whole band. But when i watched what i had recorded, the people were all blurry and the lighting was real bright. I have a sony trv 250 and was wondering what settings i should mess with for next time?

    • #177572
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      broly1718 Wrote:

      the people were all blurry and the lighting was real bright

      I suppose closing the iris 1 or 2 steps and better adjusting of the focus should have prevented this. You could also have tried the slow shutter mode, if available on your cam (in that case open the iris a little).

    • #177573
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Would that be the same thing as adjusting the exposure? sorry new to this

    • #177574
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Yes, “iris” and “exposure” are the same thing (“exposure” is more used in photography and “iris” in video).

    • #177575
      AvatarTomScratch
      Participant

      Hi,
      Here’s another thought.
      Shooting a performance from the audience is very challenging and often produces results that are not very satisfactory. Ideally, you should put your cam on a tripod, stay out of the way but get as close as you can to the stage. Your blurry problem suggests camera movement, so wherever you end up, try to use a tripod for steadiness, even if the legs are not spread out.
      I found the specs on the TRV280; the specs on the TRV250 are possibly similar.
      Unless you are zoomed all the way in for a close-up, the automatic exposure of a cam will frequently give you overexposed, over-bright faces in a stage setting. Your cam probably has a manual exposure. You should zoom in for a close-up of a character on stage (getting out of your chair to do this if need be); and when it looks correctly exposed in the viewfinder, turn on the manual exposure to lock-in this exposure setting. Or, you can just put your cam in the manual mode and adjust the exposure manually until it looks right. One of these techniques or both should work with your cam.
      Also, manually, set your shutter speed at one-sixtieth. This is probably the slowest shutter speed anyway and is also the normal speed. While a faster shutter speed could reduce blur it will also produce underexposure overall (assuming your cam would even let you set it at a faster speed in the situation you describe).
      Finally, if you are about ten or more feet from stage, you should zoom in and manually set the focus on a person on stage and toward the front of the stage. This should give you a good overall focus that won’t keep bopping in and out when an audience member’s head gets in the way. This is also a good rule of thumb even if you are in the first row.
      BTW, your cam may have “programmed” automatic exposure settings, to include a “spotlight” setting. Don’t trust this without checking it out first.
      Stage productions are tough to shoot, but generally benefit greatly from using the manual controls.
      REGARDS … TOM 8)

    • #177576
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Tom Scratch Wrote:

      Ideally, you should put your cam on a tripod, stay out of the way but get as close as you can to the stage. Your blurry problem suggests camera movement, so wherever you end up, try to use a tripod for steadiness, even if the legs are not spread out.

      I presumed broly1718 has used a tripod/monopod and his footage only went out of focus because of bad lighting. If not, then stabilization comes first, obviously…

    • #177577
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks for all the help fellas. It was on a tri pod, but i was def. more than 10 ft away on a balcony. I was also not zoomed in at all, and the camera was set to automatic everything pretty much.

    • #177578
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      In situations like that, I ALWAYS have the rear camera hooked up to a monitor so I can manually adjust the iris to compensate for the lighting change. Never rely on the camera’s ‘auto’ function to do that. Only thing you can do is process the video and reduce the luminance to take away the distortion.

      Good Luck.

    • #177579
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Johnboy Wrote:

      In situations like that, I ALWAYS have the rear camera hooked up to a monitor so I can manually adjust the iris to compensate for the lighting change. Never rely on the camera’s ‘auto’ function to do that. Only thing you can do is process the video and reduce the luminance to take away the distortion.

      Good Luck.

      Johnboy I know your message wasn’t addressed to me, but we’re talking about amateur video here… I mean broly1718 was at a concert and he shot some video with his Hi-8 camcorder, he had a tripod but wouldn’t it have been a little too much to setup a monitor there too? X-D Plus, his camcorder has an LCD monitor which is more than enough to get some settings right.
      Sorry again, didn’t want to be rude. If you have more experience in color post-processing, you could further advise on what exactly he should do to somehow fix his video for his friend, I’m sure he’d like to find out, I couldn’t get such advice when I needed it, had to pay a lot to get colors fixed in post…

    • #177580
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Yea good suggestions, but a monitor isnt really possible. And the lcd screen is kind of deceiving in a way.

      But i would like to know more about post editing, to try and fix it.

      again, thanks for the info.

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