Letus35 Lens Adapter

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    • #43557
      AvatarSpencerStewart
      Participant

      Does anyone have any experience with the letus35 adapter, or a similiar device?
      If you haven’t heard of them before, what they do is provide an adapter for an SLR lens, to create a shallower depth of field. I’m not sure about the details, but it adds a very, very nice film look to the image.

      Here’s a random example on youtube, with someone using a sony HC1, a Letus35FE.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F93L6tmj76s

      If someone can explain the concept a little better or has any experiance with these types of adapters that would be greatly appreciated.
      Thanks,

      Spencer Stewart

    • #182672
      AvatarSpencerStewart
      Participant

      Here’s another example with a consumer Canon Elura 90:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xMtVXC_Lqw

    • #182673
      AvatarSpencerStewart
      Participant

      This is the website that builds them
      http://www.adapterplace.com/

      Does anyone have any experience or knowledge about these adapters?

    • #182674
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      No to both, but I am skeptical as to what they do other than decrease the amount of light hitting the sensor. The videos aren’t before/after or split or anything, they’re just with the ‘adapter’, so how do we know that they don’t look the same before?

    • #182675
      AvatarSpencerStewart
      Participant

      Well, here’s the arguement. (Or at least what I’ve heard)

      The small CCD’s in our digital video cameras provide a very wide depth of field.
      The 35mm film used in professional cameras, provide a much larger place for light to land, and somehow result in a shallower depth of field.

      I’m not sure how the above works out technically, but it is very true.

      Okay, the lens adapter, now, has a semi-transparent glass ground plate which the video camera records. This ground plate is supposed to simulate the size and the narrow DOF that 35mm film produces, and the camera simply records that image.

      So, following light’s path into the camera, you first have the 35mm camera lens, focusing and controlling light that goes to the lens adapter. Inside the lens adapter, the light hits a ground plate, which simulates the size and narrow depth of field like 35mm film. The camera records the image on the ground plate, and viola – super shallow depth of field!

      If this doesn’t really make sense, a guy on youtube explains it pretty well:

      http://youtube.com/watch?v=j9FFRU0iJMY

      Here’s a text explanation as well, about a similar device:

      http://www.microfilmmaker.com/reviews/Issue11/M2_2.html

      He talks about the small CCD’s creating wide depth of field at 2:03
      The interesting part starts at about 4:20, when he talks about how the adapter modifies the image.

      Thanks for the reply tonsofpcs.
      Yes, the adapter does cut down light an f-stop and a half, as well as whatever the SLR lens may cut down. With proper lighting, however, this tool looks like it may be very handy for producing a film-like look.[/url]

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