JVC BR-3000U

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    • #38816
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hi. I have a JVC BR-3000U. I know this unit is old and it sold for $750 in 1986. Can I have some opinions on this VHS as a player to convert VHS tape to digital?

      I searched for this unit on the forum before this post and I could not find any information on this. Im starting out as a newbie and Ive been reading close to a hundred threads already on this subject of converting old VHS tapes to save them. Putting in the time to learn on my own through research.

      Thanx

    • #168631
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hi, I have a JVC GR-DV2000U. I do have problems with this camcorder, like bottom loading tape and bad manual focus. This aside, like many but not most camcorders, it can convert analog, using the supplied RCA to Jack cable, and taping to mini-dvd. I discovered an undocumented feature. I can use RCA in and IEEE 1394 out directly to my computer without using mini-dvd tape. If you wish to go directly to a computer without buying a new camcorder, you can buy a Break-out-Box (BoB) that connects your Camcorder to the computer.
      Drafter

    • #168632
      AvatarTomScratch
      Participant

      Hi JR,
      I think you said VCR. In the mid/late 90’s I was a big fan of a later generation of JVC’s VCRs than your model: I owned 3 BR-S378U’s, an “industrial” SVHS deck. I kept them busy doing a lot of tape to tape edits including A/B roll through a full featured video mixer. Those were the days when you would need to have the physical coordination to do 6 or 10 separate manual procedures within a 10 or 15 second time frame to achieve simple video effects (e.g., manually fade in from black, manually fade in soundtrack, fade in CG text, fade out text, etc.). With PC editing, you can take all the time you want to finesse these steps — although you need to be Mentally Coordinated even if not physically challenged. One of the wonderful things about this system was that it was frame perfect (had pre-roll) although my friends moving over to PC editing at the time had a hard time believing this. A very useful feature of these decks was (and still is) the fast erase function where I could erase an entire VHS tape in a few minutes and recycle for another job. Possibly your deck has this function.

      All that being said about my love for these decks, I did find that about every 18 to 24 months or so, each of these decks would need to go into the shoppe for serious maintenance in order to perform at the level I required (e.g., for belt replacement, etc etc). Back then (8-10 years ago), the maintenance would cost me typically in the $75 to $125 range each time.

      Regarding your deck, I wouldn’t start any serious project without having it checked in the shop first. This may cost you as much as buying a decent new deck! The price is worth it to not have the sinking experience of seeing your precious tapes being enjoyed as a meal by your deck. Also, if your deck doesn’t have an S-cable output (at the least), I would think twice about using this deck for serious dubbing work. Still, if you are not fussy and your work is not intended for the local big screen cinema multi-plex, you deck might do the job you want it to. Several years ago, 40 prominent film directors from around the world (David Lynch, Spike Lee, Zhang Yimou, etc.) each got to make a short film using a 100 year old Lumiere camera, with the results compiled in the film, Lumiere and Company. It Worked For Them.
      REGARDS … TOM

    • #168633
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      WOW! Thanks for the great information from all. 😀 This is great advice. Yes Tom Scratch I did say VCR. I wasnt sure I used the correct terminology so I edited my post. Apparently I was right the first time.

      I looked at my JVC unit again tonight. Unfortunately it does not have s-video. But it does have the fast erase function. As a newbie some of what you said is still over my head but I am in the learning mode. I need to find a repair shop and get a quote and then decide if its worth the money to have it gone through. Any ideas if this unit is worth anything?

      Thanks again for the great replies

      J

    • #168634
      AvatarTomScratch
      Participant

      Hi,
      Based on original price, this was probably an advanced top prosumer model when it came out. The jvc website (jvc.com) lists hundreds of models for which they carry instruction books, but your model is not on the list. Otherwise, it appears that there is no information in the website about this model.
      If your machine is in good shape from a maintenance standpoint, it should be solid for simple playback or erasure of VHS tapes. Possibly, playback would be better than on many subsequent decks, including one’s in the store today. (E.G., Might be interesting to compare performance of your deck vs the VHS function of some of the multifunction decks out there today, such as decks that play VHS plus DVD plus CD plus etc.) I wouldn’t be surprised if your deck at least holds its own in the VHS department.
      The jvc web site lists their official jvc repair sites around the country. I’d have one of them look at it. Make your decision about future use of this deck after getteing their input.
      REGARDS … TOM 8)

    • #168635
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hey Tom Scratch. I found it after reading your post. It’s under professional products. Use the search function. It’s there.

      I bet your right on the quality of this unit compared to some of the units out today. I’ll take your advice and see what the JVC repair techs say and post back with their input.

      Thanks for the reply.

      J

    • #168636
      AvatarTomScratch
      Participant

      Hi,
      Glad you caught this. There is a LOT of info there.
      Couple more thoughts on this deck.
      The write-up makes it sound like JVC went to extra effort to maximize the quality of video recorded in the EP mode. (I always tried to avoid EP myself. Accidently purchasing a pre-recorded tape that was in EP mode has been known to drive me to the edge of losing my cool… But maybe JVC found a way to make EP look as good as SP?)
      Per write-up, this deck has BNC outputs. Panasonic still markets excellent Proline CRT video monitors that take BNC inputs, as well as S-video. I have several Panasonic CRT monitors, all several years old. They have not been treated gently but still work as well as day one. You might be able to get a good deal on a used one.
      The audio specs look decent for this deck. In the past, I have used VHS and S-VHS tape and decks just for recording audio, with the video/visuals being relevant (if relevant at all) only for locating a particular audio in or out point. These daze, this might be regarded as quaint, what with custom mix CD’s (for the video project) being as easy as ringing a bell.
      REGARDS … TOM 8)

    • #168637
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hey Tom Scratch: Can you give me a couple of model numbers to look for on a monitor?

      Thankx

    • #168638
      AvatarTomScratch
      Participant

      Hi Again,

      This is a current model avail from bhphotovideo.com for $290. On the Panasonic website, price given is $350. All about it:
      The Panasonic CT-2088YB is a 20″ color monitor designed for industrial or educational video display. Its professional features include industrial input connectors, high-resolution 450 horizontal lines and professional grounded AC cord.
      Key Features: The CT-2088YB is made for professional environments where reliable performance is most critical. This model comes with 3 sets of composite video inputs in the form of BNC connectors, one BNC output connector, one S-video input, and 3 mono-audio inputs in the form of RCA jacks. The monitor also has a panel control lock, a closed captioning decoder and enhanced audio functions.

      The unit that I have with me now “on location” is the 14″ Panasonic CT-1386YD, manufactured in Feb 99. Has been manhandled in general and shipped around the country from Portland OR to Anchorage to Seattle to DC. Produces the sharpest picture and most realistic color of any TV or monitor I have in the collection at this time. I have two more of these at another location. Even though not the latest technology, this model is one to consider if you can find a deal on the used market. Appears that the specs are very close (if not the same) between my unit and the current model above, except for screen size. (it was a solid product and they didn’t mess with it…)
      REGARDS … TOM

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