Is it lighting or what?

  • This topic has 3 replies, 1 voice, and was last updated 17 years ago by AvatarAnonymous.
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    • #36520
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I notice in the filming process of many motion pictures the scenes are flooded with light and very bright. However in the production part of the movie when it goes to the screen the scene is very professional and hi end. Is this accomplished by contrast with the lighting by the software or what?

    • #162648
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      also keep in mind that a camera lens doesn’t see light the way we do. Just because it looks flooded to use doesn’t mean it will be blown once the light is converted by the CCD.

    • #162649
      Avatarsacredream
      Participant

      actually what you’re talking about is a completly film thing. Anything shot digitally is pretty much what you see what you get. Film however you don’t get that luxuray. when lighting in film what you’re most worried about is the tempeture of the scene. if there’s too much light it over exposes if not enough it under exposes. you’re looking for that middle area, but even then when you go over the dailies you’ll find the film is very washed out. that’s okay because with technology today we can go through that film and make adjustments to make it look all pretty. that’s the power of color correction baby. when shooting digitaly however you always aim for brighter becuase trying to brighten a dark image will cause grain much more than darkening bright scene.

    • #162650
      Avatarsacredream
      Participant

      compusolver Wrote:

      when shooting digitaly however you always aim for brighter becuase trying to brighten a dark image will cause grain much more than darkening bright scene.

      Actually, my experience has been just the opposite. Too bright and you blow out detail – its lost forever. Too dark (to the same degree – but not to extreme) and you still have detail that can be brought out.

      Of course, having to correct anything past a certain degree, creates side effects that can get worse than the original problem.

      In short, its always best to expose properly, but to err on the side of underexposure (with digital) is better than overexposure.

      I have noticed some of the new high def camera’s can pick up darker scenes better right now we’re still using the DVX but I’ve gotten to play with the HVX and there is a great difference. With the series I’m working on we use a lot of dark gels to add a mysterious dimention so we tend to have to go brighter or else the scene looks black, but really there is no right and wrong just what looks good. πŸ™‚

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