Inkjet printable DVD printer

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    • #41868
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      I am looking for a decent printer that can print directly to the white printable DVD/BD discs. Last year I purchased a HP D7560, but have been disapointed in what it has to offer. Sure it can print directly to discs, and the printing part it does just fine, HOWEVER you are stuck using a very limited amount of templates – most that look disgustingly generic – mainly because you HAVE to use the software that came with the printer in order to print to DVDs.

      Is there a disc printer out there that has more flexibility on what you print?

    • #176920
      Avatar210pe
      Participant

      I am confuse why you have to use their software. I just found a Win7 (and other) drivers for that printer. If Windows can see it then any program should be able to use it.

    • #176921
      AvatarBruceMol
      Participant

      I had the same experience with HP – after almost a year of fighting with it, doing ‘work arounds’ to get the image I wanted, I gave it away.

      I replaced it with the Canon 4700 and I am so impressed.

    • #176922
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      210pe You can use generic drivers to simply print with the printer, the issue comes with printing specifically to the DVD. No program offers the distinction of printing off the DVD area rather than the paper feed.

      Bruce, I will look at the printer you just mentioned thanks!

    • #176923
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      Bruce – what exact model is that? I see the ip4700 online but I do not see that it can print to white printable discs?

    • #176924
      Avatarcomposite1
      Member

      I picked up a Microboards GX Auto printer a while back. There was an issue with it not initializing and I sent it back. They replaced it and it’s worked quite well. Now, you do have to use the supplied printing software to properly align the artwork, but I never use the templates because they’re too boring. It is much simpler to design the artwork in phoshop to size and flatten it down into a jpeg and then import it into the printing software as a picture. If any text is needed, the printing software is good for that. They are a bit on the higher end ($800 – $1k +) but if you’re looking to do runs of less than 200 it’s a pretty good deal.

    • #176925
      AvatarBruceMol
      Participant

      Well I can’t explain that. I have a Canon iP4700 sitting right beside me and it prints on white CD/DVD. I looked on the CANON site – no mention of the feature, I looked at the on line manual, no mention of the feature – totally bizarre.

      Wait – the New Zealand Canon site backs me up…http://www.canon.co.nz/en-nz/For-You/Printers/PIXMA-InkJet-Printers/iP4700

    • #176926
      Avatarhmueller
      Participant

      I have been using an Epson Artisan 50 that I bought about a year and a bit ago. It cost less than $100 and has been working great ever since. If it ever breaks, I will throw it away and simply buy another.

      Heidi

    • #176927
      AvatarD0n
      Participant

      check out epson’s consumer printers we’ve used them for years.

    • #176928
      AvatarYvon
      Participant

      Hi,

      We print day along with a Canon IP4300 it is fast an non stop between DVD, coming with a software coming we can learn in 5 minutes,At home my printer come out and I bought for about $89 a Canon IP 4700 same software work great.

      If we go outside to the screen printer for a run of 1000 DVD this cost 0.72 each include printing and DVD cost.

      Inkjet gives a nice resolution but printing is dull, much better than paper sticker.

      What is the best solution Canon one by one or more sophicated solution with autoloading?

      Regards,

      YR

    • #176929
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      I don’t need any heavy duty printing at the moment. Maybe 7 discs max per wedding (sometimes double that if the ceremony is long and I have to put the rest on a separate disc.) The TV shows I do require about7 or so, so no major print runs.

      I will be recording a Wedding Entertainment Directorsworkshop in a couple weeks and the discs probably will be produced for sale, but at that ratewe will probably use Amazon’s service to handle it all.

      I will have to look at the Epsons, the Canon ip4700 in question runs about $500. A bit steep I think for what I am looking for. I know I have a regularEpson here that is cheaper than buying new ink to replace the old. It worked fine – and the ink inclulded apparently was full stock. Funny how that works… don’t tell Al Gore.

      Thanks!

    • #176930
      AvatarBruceMol
      Participant

      Something else is amiss on the internet re iP4700. I too found someone willing to sell it for $499 but the list price is $100 in Canada. I bought mine for $80 on sale from STAPLES.CA Who no longer carry it. It is NOT a $500 printer – I have a $500 Canon i9900 and there is quite a difference between it and the iP4700. I suspect iP4700 has been replaced by something else in the sub $100 US/Can. price range

    • #176931
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      epson is the only printer I’ve found that prints cds. None of the stores carry any other cd printable brands.

    • #176932
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      Looking at the Epson Artisan 725. The 50 seems to be out of stock everywhere. Also the CISS caught my eye while looking. Anyone used one of these systems?

    • #176933
      AvatarCraftersOfLight
      Participant

      I got the Epson Artisan810 Printer on sale for $125 a few months back. It does a great job for both the DVD and the sheet for the coverslip. All the parts are internal so you don’t misplace them.

    • #176934
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      “All the parts are internal so you don’t misplace them.”

      Sounds familiar – My HP bracket goes MIA quite a bit because I am a master at forgetting where I just put something doen 1 minute ago.

    • #176935
      AvatarYvon
      Participant

      Hi,

      If you print an average of 7 DVD per event. epson, canon can fit your need. If you buy it from Staples or a Canadian division this is less than $100 I don’t know why you speak about $500. The main advantage over paper sticker is the product look more professional also if you have a genial ideas you can add a clear top coat.With top coatno difference between a product made with a $2000 to $10,000 printerand one made with a common printer.

      Regards,

      YR

    • #176936
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      I was able to download the CD printing software from Epson to try it out. I think I found a winner. SO much more flexibility in customizing!

      Has anyone used a CISS (constant ink supply source)? I am wondering if it is worth it to get one of these as well.

    • #176937
      AvatarD0n
      Participant

      more trouble than they’re worth…. but then I’m a pro photographer….. maybe I’m fussier when it comes to print quality.

    • #176938
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      On second thought, I MAY be able to get away with screenshotting the project and then importing that picture to the HP software and use the blank template. $ saved there I guess! I will do a test print to make sure the quality holds up. After all I did just replace all the HP ink with XL cartriges and would hate to waste all that.

      As far as the clear coating I see a couple of you talking about, where would I get that?

    • #176939
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      I sound so indecisive don’t I? Well I was able to get a heck of a deal on the Epson 725. $50 off on sale at Staples + another $50 for bringing in an old printer I haven’t used in 5 years. Final price: $99. $45 cheaper than Amazon which is what I was going to do originally.

    • #176940
      AvatarAnonymous
      Guest

      Confused a little bit.

    • #176941
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      Confused about?

    • #176942
      AvatarCharles
      Participant

      OK boys and girls, one thing to remember about print work to make it look better is to have your seetings setto 300 dots per inch, 72 which is common to film and the internet does not look that good in print. Up-converting from 72 DPI to 300 DPI does not work as expected.

      While I do quite a bit of video work, I also do just as much print work for printers. A still image of the couple will look infinately better than one taken from film. Also, if you enlarge an image to make it fit, it will not look as clean and will look pixilated. Just an FYI.

      Start off with the best images as possible at the highest DPI and make sure that your fonts are also at that DPI will go a long way to making better looking covers and labels.

    • #176943
      AvatarEarlC
      Member

      Not always, but on occasion you can get decent graphics for your DVDs from a framestore or still frame off your video footage. My approach is to use Photoshop, de-interlace, reduce the size (dimensions) of the image which is often as much as 20″ wide to about 5″ which kicks up the resolution to 150, sometimes even 300, and tolerably usable when combined with a colored background or other art elements. This isn’t always the case and you will experience frustrations, but it can come out pretty darn good more often than you might imagine.

      As Shultz points out, up-converting from the original size document in 72 DPI to 300 does not work as desired. Nor does it do to uprez then stretch or expand the image. But de-interlacing, and reducing the image size to up the dpi even to 150 sometimes working out, and using sharpen/unsharp mask in Photoshop and often generate a decent quality graphic from still images taken from your video footage. A clean still taken from a frame where movement is minimized or even momentarily stopped, and with good quality lighting will often result in something useable.

      So while having digital images or photo scans at the proper original 300 dpi is preferred, it isn’t always the ONLY way to achieve decent imaging for DVD graphics.

      For the record I still use the Epson Stylus Photo R380 with single DVD print tray hand-fed and have slowly and patiently printed as many as 400 to 500 units, and I use a bulk or constant ink supply. (ALWAYS burn first as burning pre-printed disks, at least disks printed with inkjet and not sufficiently dried, will result in tiny, but sometimes larger, hairline striations and lines outward from the center hub that are unsightly at best, horrific at worst)

      If you print first allow a few days drying time (I’ve occasionally had disks all over my place, on every countertop, cabinet, bookcase, platform or even the entire floor of a room air-drying before burning) which minimizes if not eliminates the inner hub outward defects in your graphics. When I can I burn first.

      Regarding bulk or constant ink supply. Depending on what you find and where, and the quality of the bulk ink provided, a $125 to $200 investment in such an apparatus is GREAT. It’s just that not ALL available printers, brands or models have CISS or constant ink supply systems available for them. And some become unavailable almost as soon as you buy one, that might leave you stranded finding suitable replacement ink.

      On the plus side, there were two models available for the Epson 260 and 380 when I got my first Epson 380, so I purchased the unit for the 380 for $125 from Denver Disc dot com and I continue to obtain my replacement ink fro them even though the CISS system I purchased AND the Epson 380 are no longer available* at a cost of something over $60 plus S&H. Essentially, for about $65 I get the equivalent of 11 six-cartridge replacements for less than the price of one set of Epson branded cartridges from, say, Fry’s Electronics.

      When my first Epson 380 experienced the “return to factory for service” warning, then ceased to operate because the built-in spillover pad was saturated or exceeded its service time, or whatever the built-in obsolescence is with this due to Epson’s worry about ink spill damage and lawsuits, and I could not find instructions for modifying the overflow apparatus like can be done with some other models, I was lucky to find a reasonably fresh 380 printer on ebay and purchased it. I adapted it to my CISS and am continuing to use it. At some point this model also will fail to come on anymore due to the built in anti-spill protection thingy. When it does, however, I will have saved a major amount of money on printer and ink cartridge expenses over an approximately 4-years-and-counting run.

      I’ve seen where CISS rigs are available for some HP and Canon model printers. These can be found by searching Google for Constant Ink Supply Systems or Continuous Ink Supply Systems or Bulk Ink Supply Systems for (preferred model) printer.

      And yes, the Epson printer software for DVD labeling is GREAT. But I still have developed my own general template in Photoshop, save it as a TIFF or JPEG then use the image in the Epson disk printing software to place it as a background image for printing. After playing around with inner and outer diameter print area and shifting, you’ll get fairly consistent hub-to-outer-rim printed disks with good quality colored graphics. I use the Epson disk printing software to occasionally set up a special tag for Photoshop pre-designed graphics such as “Photo JPG CD” or “Music CD” or whatever, but the initial and primary labeling is done via Photoshop.

      All this is great and convenient and easy once you get your basics lined out and learn the various printer and system idiosyncrasies and how to adjust for them.

    • #176944
      Avatarterrym21
      Participant

      I have noticed that there are lots of brands of inkjet printable discs, but hardly anyone sells a printer for them. So for now, I am sticking with thermal printing on shiny silver blanks. I’m using a Casio CW-50, which is fine for very low volume. Most of my customers could care less about disc graphics. They just want to watch family members in ball games, weddings, etc. But there are times when I would like to package something special on Blu-ray, etc. I bought a DYMO DiscPainters last year only to learn soon after that they quit making it. It’s just a matter of time before I will not be able to find ink cartridges for it. Every time I look for Epson online, it says out of stock on the ones that print to disc.

    • #176945
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      Many of the Epson Artisanprinters out there still print to discs even when they don’t state it. Head to a local retail outlet and check out the Epsons, and if you don’t like the price, then search online for the same model and order. Personally Staples is pretty decent, as I turned in a 10 year old printer for a $100 rebate on my Epson Artisan 725. Cost me $99 in the end and I didnt have to pay to dispose of my printer. Amazon has the same printer for $99 – Same price! Then I ordered a CISS for about $40 and I have been printing 10-20 full color discs per week for about 6 months now and still plent yo f ink left. http://www.amazon.com/Epson-Artisan-Color-Inkjet-C11CA74201/dp/B003XDU8O4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1316667685&sr=8-1

    • #176946
      AvatarEarlC
      Member

      You noticed my L-O-N-G previous post here. Following THAT I did some research and discovered a few makes and models that print CD/DVD and have available bulk ink or CISS available for them. I will soon have a blog post up focusing on the information I discovered regarding those. E.C. Come, E.C. Go – blogging about video production and marketing since 2004.

    • #176947
      Avatarvid-e-o-man
      Participant

      Just purchased anEpson artisan 725 from the Epson site for $99 (in artic white color only). No mail-in rebate or trade-in etc. My first attempt at DVD printing wasvery satisfactory and am looking forward to playing around with the possibilities available. I could use somerecommendations on brands of printable DVD/Blu-ray discs. I, too am looking at the CISinks website for continuous or refillable ink cartridges. Anyone have any experience with how they work or how they compare to the ‘Claria’ inks that are in the Epson brand.

      Earl let us know when you have your post up about this subject, I always look forward to the info you give especially on EC come EC go. Thank you for sharing with us.

    • #176948
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      3 Words: GLOSSY GLOSSY GLOSSY

      For DVDs There is a night and day difference in quality between matte and glossy discs. Not only that but the matte disks are severely prone to moisture, where as the glossy aqua discs more or less absorb – it can still make a water mark if bad enough, but you wont get ink all over yer wet hands. Don’t ask why my hands were wet…. Anyway, Quality from the glossy discs is far superior. MY OPINION.

      The Glossy BD-Rs are so so. I still haven’t found a true glossy BD-R, the ones I have listed are more of a satin. For the price, I am not sure I will order again.

      All these discs listed below are tried and true. I have had 100% success with ALL of them – no complaints. I still use all of them.

      Single Layer DVD+R: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001GR1C3A

      Dual Layer DVD+R: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003WUKWRG

      Glossy BD-R: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004K4VNYO

      Matte BD-R: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003WO7XP6

      This is the CISS I bought: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003ZMETO8

      Quality wise – I have a very wide spectrum color photo that I have printed with both inks, and I cannot visually tell a difference.

      I have had a down side though – if I do not pint for a week or so, the first print I print will not look so hot – it makes me think that maybe the ink dried slightly on the ink heads. After that all the prints look fantastic again. This is easily remedied though – I can sacrifice one piece of printer paper occasionally if it saves me tons more $ on ink.

      Hope this helps!

    • #176949
      Avatarvid-e-o-man
      Participant

      Double, thanks for the recommendations. I purchased the only kind that I found in a store locally to get started and they were Phillips matte finish. I think that I would like the look of the gloss finish better. After reading your post about the glossy aqua discs, I am looking forward to replenishing my supply with those. When I run out of the ink that came with the printer I will probably jump to the refillable cartridges until my warranty runs out and then grind on the printer to attach the ciss. The link to the matte BD-R goes to a branded disc.

      Thanks again for the response.

    • #176950
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      Ahh so the link must have changed (i copied them right out of my amazon order log) – same brand – matte discs are what I have. For the price it may be worth sticking to Matte with those until I find a really nice glossy coating on a reputable disc.

      Also for the CISS, there really isn’t much grinding to do – you can’t even tell anything was done, it is all under the cover – and even then it is difficult to spot. Think of it this way – it is a $99 printer which for what it is and does is dirt cheap. The ink will cost you way more than $99 to refill with brand name ink. CISS in my opinion would probably save you more $ in the long run.

    • #176951
      AvatarEarlC
      Member

      The no. 1 primary reason for AVOIDING glossy print DVD/CD blanks is nose grease, finger grease, fingerprints and smears. And it is not possible to educate consumers into holding these by the edges to avoid fingerprints on either side, because too many people of too many age categories handle them and there’s going to be residue there, regardless.

      So, while I LOVE the look of glossy, I hate the overwhelmingly unsightly look of a glossy surface (not to mention the extra cost for getting this fingerprint retainer) that has been handled a couple of times. Have you ever tried to wipe or wash off the smears? I have. Din’t werk.

    • #176952
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      Earl, have you tried the glossy discs I have mentioned?

      From my experience, the matte discs smudge far easier than glossy – and the only way I have seen marks on glossy the glossy discs I mentioned is literally soaking them in water. I have rubbed my fingers over them many times with no issue.

      With the matte discs – at least with the epson inks (brand inks and the ciss inks) is it is 100% NOT water resistant. You sneeze across the room and you have ink spots. This has been tried with 4 different brands of matte discs – surely an ink issue.

      The surface sucks the ink right up – you can burn immediately after
      printing and the ink will not run – yes I know that is not the
      recommended order but I do it quite often with no problems. Put a drop
      of water on your finger and touch the surface and you will have a dry
      finger.

    • #176953
      AvatarEarlC
      Member

      Yes, I’ve actually tried them all. Not talking about moisture, talking about grease smudges, fingerprints and oils and stuff that transfers off human skin. Not water. Oils, fingerprints, ugly streaks caused by skin oils and oils that come from eating chips or fries or hamburgers then handling a disk. I do thousands, gimme clean, less oily prints, etc. over moisture barrier glossy anytime. There is, of course, no right answer, only what works, or not, for each of us.

      For me, it’s oily “fingerprintless” matte or semi-gloss. Just like I wouldn’t want to smear my monitors with touch-screen capabilities ’cause I like to snack while I edit or work the web. I’ll continue to use keyboard shortcuts and mousing around πŸ˜‰

    • #176954
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      This video was in the making (printing, shooting, rendering, uploading) long before your last post, sorry! I was just trying to continue my last post as quick as I could. I tested the discs head to head. I first rubbed my nose with my finger and rubbed each disc, then I did a water test – The rest is history. You can watch in in 1080p for detail.

      Just now I looked at the discs, any streaks on the glossy disc were easily removed with a slightly damp cloth.

    • #176955
      AvatarEarlC
      Member

      I’m very glad that’s working out for you DH. Always go with what you know.

    • #176956
      AvatarKenkyusha
      Participant

       Have any of you guys tried spraying a coat of a clear paint after printing?  Is there some quick and convenient way to ‘fix’ the print to cut down on smudges and running?

    • #176957
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      Clear coat is not that easy – tough to get it to look nice and even. Not only that the mess and drying time are not worth it imo.

    • #176958
      Avatarvid-e-o-man
      Participant

      Double, I’m in the beginning stages of learning how to use the disc printing on the Epson Artisan 725. I have been experimenting with the inner diameter and outer diameter to cover the white. I noticed that on the discs that you printed you had the color fade to white on the inner and outer, great idea! Was that hard to setup to print that way?

    • #176959
      Avatardoublehamm
      Participant

      In the Artisan Print CD program there is an option for this. Go to Blur, select ‘background’ and then ‘both’ then I set mine at 20%. You can mess with that number as you please. lower % = smaller blend area.

    • #176960
      Avatarvid-e-o-man
      Participant

      double, thanks for the info on the blur. Gotta love this site with everyone so willing to share. keep shooting.

    • #212935
      Avatareunice
      Member

      There are many software you can try but not all printer are capable of making cd printing unless you only use the labels for printing.. but if the CD itself, I guess you need a reliable printer. For printing services instead, try http://www.digitekprinting.com/..

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