In search of some opinions……

  • This topic has 6 replies, 1 voice, and was last updated 16 years ago by AvatarAnonymous.
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    • #38828
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I used to do video productions a few years ago, but due to developing cancer I lost the ‘desire’ to continue, but now, being cured, I am wanting to get into it a bit more and want to go with computer based editing. I have two Panasonic S-VHS cameras (AG-455 and AG456). I am currently looking at just keeping these with the thought of getting new digital cameras in the future. (c’mon lottery) πŸ˜€ Anyhoo, I am looking for your opinions on what’s good out there to use with the current cameras that I have. I don’t know too much about the computer based editing software packages and I am concerned about retaining the native 30 fps quality. I am looking for the best, economical program that will give me the same results as if I were editing on tape machines.

      Your thoughts please……. thanks.

    • #168651
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Well, I am starting as a videographer working with MiniDV camcorders, so I don’t know anything about S-VHS cameras, so I can’t help you. I just wanted to say congratulations on you recovery and continue to pursue your goals!

    • #168652
      AvatarAnonymous
      Guest

      Congrats on your recovery.

      I just purchased Adobe Premiere Elements. It runs about $100. You cn check it our at http://www.adobe.com. I haven’t had the chance toplay with it yet but it seems to be loaded with features.

      I don’t know how you’d get S-VHS into the computer. Maybe someone else will notice and be able to answer.

    • #168653
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      thanks Hank for your reply,

      I was leaning towards Studio Plus, my concern or question would be which method of import is better as far as firewire or usb. I am looking at having a computer built for this, but am not sure what package will offer the best results. I just don’t know what hardware to go with as far as capture. Will i need a video card with a tv out option for output to an analog device or does one of the software packages breakout box sort of eliminate that? What does the breakout box connect to? Just trying to get my ducks in a row before I nail down a final computer configuration.

      John

    • #168654
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      sorry, i wasn’t clear, I was thinking in line towards future needs, I plan on eventually going to a digital camcorder for aquisition (probably next year 3 quarter). What’s your opinion of Studio Moviebox? I appreciate your input. Thanks so much.

      John

    • #168655
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I have and use both Studio 9 and Premiere Pro. Pro is by far the best of the two in the long run, but is expensive. My question would be it’s purpose. If you are capturing from VHS tape to convert to DVD, your final product is still going to be analog converted to DVD either way. Sonic’s My DVD will capture as AVI or Mpeg files as far as the software is concerned, but does not come with a way to plug in your VHS. You would have to install an ATI card with capture capabilities, or something similiar. Studio 9 offers both software and capture box to plug into.
      If, in the end your purpose is to create studio quality DVD’s from digital then you would do well to figure out a way to come up with a capture card like ATI’s Radion family and Premiere Pro with Encore DVD to create your finished product. We’re talking about “Bucks” here, but in the end the difference is seen. As for capturing from Digital Camcorder later, go with Firewire. It’s faster and more stable than USB. Any software out there will capture through firewire. Capture as AVI since it make smaller files to edit from, and then create your DVD with Adobe Encore DVD and let it transcode to Mpegs before it burns to DVD. The biggest thing with Digital Video is, when you get your computer, put the biggest 2nd hard drive in it that you can afford and capture to it, not the maindrive that the software is installed on. Also, put at least 1 gig of RAM in it and try to keep it pure for digital purposes. If you can, try not to do too much travelling on the Net on that machine for fear of viruses. I lost a bunch of work to a virus, to learn that lesson. Since then, I search the net and do email on a second hand computer that’s made from spare parts and I don’t care if it crashes. I just kick it, then format it and start over <grin>.
      I have not had cancer, but have had 4 heart bypasses done twice in the past 10 years and I depend on my computers and video capabilities to make a living as it’s the only way I have. People just don’t hire you when you are 59 and in bad health. If you have a way to make it work, Go with the best you can get now but plan to upgrade as much as you can later.

    • #168656
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Your advice is also great. But, as in anything in life there are always a variety of opinions. I operate a 64 track audio recording studio that over the past 3 years has ventured over into the music video end of the business. I’ve learned over time that I seem to need computers that are pretty much dedicated to what I do with audio or video alone plus an office machine that does my net surfing and email, etc. There have been times in the past when I have not lost any important files, as I have a pretty religious backup strategy myself. But, even with backups……if one has to spend the time to reformat and reinstall an os and all of your other software it’s a great loss of time. I do realize that all who read this forum do not make a living on their computers and that most are here as a hobby. I’m fortunate because my job and hobby are one in the asmesame. I joined the forum because I can always learn from anyone’s ideas.
      You seem to have a better trust in Norton than I. Granted, Norton, Mcafee, even Windows XP itself are all getting better at protection just as using a hardware firewall on your network through your router helps but nothing is perfect. I’ve had some pretty good virus scripts that have slipped through the cracks. In fact I have Norton on my Audio computers and McAfee on my video computer but don’t totally trust either one.
      I don’t seem to be alone in this feeling, if you reference the April 2005 issue of Videomaker Mag…..page 80 article by Kyle Cassidy. Or, visit the following link http://www.videomaker.com/scripts/article.cfm?id=10973. I think the point is to all help each other which we both seem to have an interest in. Thanks a bunch for your reply.

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