I need Help looking for a Computer to run Vegas Pro 8

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    • #46870
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hello There,

      I have just purchased Vegas Pro 8. I know 9 is
      coming out in 2 weeks, but I got a pretty smoking deal for 8. So I
      have the software, but now I need a computer to run it on. I have been
      getting mixed answers on where to get a computer. Some people on here
      say don’t buy from a big manufacture because they don’t know what they
      are doing. But I talked to some colleagues of mine (In fact, one of
      them is a Vegas Expert) and they are using computers from Dell, HP,
      Sony. I also have noticed some other people on here recommend building
      a computer. On that note, I know how to drive the car, but not fix or
      rebuild an engine like a car mechanic does. I would love to know how
      to do that, but I was not blessed with those talents. Some people also
      say get a local computer shop to build one, but I heard that is
      expensive to do so. Plus I just moved here to Colorado and I don’t
      know any local shops I could trust to buy from. Bottomline is I am
      looking for a computer that will be reliable, will be a workhorse. I
      do not want to run into a problem 6 months later and realized that I
      should have gotten more storage or a faster this or that, yada, yada,
      yada…. I am guessing you guys are getting my drift. I also would
      like to make sure if I go desktop that I would get a tower to be able
      to make changes to the computer in the future if I need to. One more
      thing to, Desktop or Laptop? It would be nice to be able to go mobile,
      so if a client needs something right then and there, I have the ability
      to do so. I just feel like the Desktop will tie me down and it is
      bulky while moving it, but it may be good for me to do so. I realize
      the Desktop will probably have a higher performance level than a laptop
      to. Well, I hope I didn’t leave any important info out. Thank you for
      your time, your help and your responses.

      Thank you,

      Chad

      P.S.
      My budget is $5000, but I would like to spend under $2500, so I can
      save money and spend money on other things I need for my video
      production business. But I am willing to pay, what I need to pay to
      make sure I have a very good performing computer, so I don’t have to
      waste my time trying to fix and deal with problems with this computer.
      One more thing, I am very open to any suggestions on the direction I
      need to go with getting this computer. Thank you again!

  • #192951
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Last september I got the Gateway P-7811 FX it runs centrino 2 technology has a 17 inch high def display and ddr3 ram…pluc a host of other features and specs you can find here: http://www.laptopmag.com/review/laptops/gateway-p-7811-fx.aspx

    There is no doubt that you can find something else along those lines, sony makes one very comparable, as does HP but I love my computer, it runs Adobe master suite cs4 without a single hiccup (AVCHD compression even). It is barely portable because of it’s size and weight but it is still possible to take it with me on location. If you plan to have your rig for a while, I would recommend you start in this arena because you can bet a lot of bang for your buck and it seems like it will serve the functions you have set forth.

    Also, although there was a time when laptops were nothing more than word processors that you could carry around, modern tech has made them ever bit as powerful as desktops if you have the appropriate funds. The only downside is upgradability, but even that has come a long way in the past two years or so. Keep your eyes and mind open and I have no doubt that you will find exactly what you need.

  • #192952
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Thank you TDedmonSBP. Does AVCHD compression give people trouble with their computers? What do you use your computer for business or home movies? Do you use it on a daily basis to cut and produce video? What kind of camera do you use with it? Are you ingesting video from MiniDV Tapes or P2 Cards or Recording Devices? Are you using HD or SD or both? Thank you for your kind words again. I will look into that laptop. You probably know where I am at, this past week I have been jamming information about NLE Systems and Computers in my brain. I feel like a Zombie.

    I also thought about some more things to add to my list of preferences for my Computer. For my OS, I would like to use XP Pro or Vista Business, because I don’t want extra programs, apps, or just stuff making my computer slow or slow down to do the jobs I need to get done in a time efficient manner. I am looking to edit on the computer, burn dvds and blu-ray discs, upload videos to my website that I will create. Also upload videos to different websites. I would like to see if I can put videos on the iphone, because I would like to be able to show videos or demos of my work to future clients to sell my services. I am guessing this is pretty easy if you are using Final Cut, since they are both apple, I am just a little worried since Vegas is sony. If I can think of anything else, I will post it.

    Thank you,

    Chad

  • #192953
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    Hi Chad.

    Vegas is a good beginner’s choice, as it is inexpensive, and it is an ‘all in one.’

    As for hardware, all I really know is that if you go Dell, get either a T5400/5500 or a T7400/7500 workstation (T7400/7500 preferred) with a big PSU (power supply). That will give you lots of room to expand. You may not know anything technical now, but it will pay to learn to pick techie things up as you go along, and in a big sort of way. Even a race car driver has to learn at least something about auto mechanics, even if he does not do the work himself. But getting a prebuilt with tech support will get you started on that road without having to learn everything before you begin.

    Again if this is your first machine, get the Dell Gold technical support, and for as long as you can. That way, any hiccups you run into, Dell will cover you. You just get on the phone or on email chat (your preference)and they will walk you through.Priceless (although I absolutely do not recommend Home and Home Office support.)

    Vegas runs on the number of cores, so get a processor with 4 cores, Vista 64-bit Business or Ultimate, and lots of RAM. People love the new Core i7, and it is supposed to be something like 40% faster than the CoreDuo series, for very little more money. The GTX 260/280 cards are a great bang for the buck.

    You will want/need Dell to install a RAID controller card. Your C drive does not have to be in RAID 0, but your D: drive (data) does. Dell charges a small fortune for extras, so if you know anyone who can help you add the D: drives themselves in RAID 0, you will save a lot of money. I did not know anything when I got my first machine either (and some would argue that I still don’t), and I gotC: as two drives in RAID 0, and then I added D: in RAID 0 later myself. (Dells come with all of the cables.) Someone at http://www.tomshardware.com will probably be happy to talk you through adding D: in RAID 0. Just be sure to get RAID 0 something from Dell, so that they will support RAID 0 arrays. I have been amazed what Dell will support with Dell Gold TechnicalSupport.

    You can get excellent prices on accessories through NewEgg or TigerDirect.com. In addition to better prices on hdd’s (hard disk drives) you can get much faster and better RAM for less from Crucial.com, or other mfrs. Look for ‘low latency.’ All hdd’s need to be fast, especially D: (data).

    You will learn lots of things as you go along, but this will get you started in a big sort of way. Dell machines are also compatible with Adobe and even Avid, if and when you decide to branch out. The main thing is just get as big of a case and power supply as you can, which allows for better cooling and expandability. Best of success.

    Norman

  • #192954
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    >>Does AVCHD compression give people trouble with their computers?

    Unless I miss the mark here, AVCHD basically means flash-memory based video recordings. Yes, it give people problems. I know Vegas supports HDV, but I am not sure if Sony supports AVCHD or not. I could not find it here.

    http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/vegaspro9

    I knowthe new Magix software supports AVCHD, and it is supposed to be both inexpensive, and good:

    http://www.magix.com/us/video-pro-x/detail/

    If you want to go AVCHD (flash memory) for your primary camcorder, I would recommend contacting the manufacturers, and make sure they say they will support it. AVCHD is supposed to give superior picture quality, but the codec is so highly compressed that it makes computers work really hard. Also, one does not have a built-in backup, as with HDV tape. There are many pros and cons.

    I think someone makes a ‘converter’ to convert the AVCHD codec to something computers can use easier, but I am not sure who. If you want to use AVCHD, Iwould check with VASST or Cineform. Perhaps someone on this forum knows?

    Norman

  • #192955
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    >>For my OS, I would like to use XP Pro or Vista Business, because I don’t want extra programs, apps, or just stuff making my computer slow or slow down to do the jobs I need to get done in a time efficient manner.

    Definitely Vista 64 bit. More RAM (which you’ll need), and faster processing speeds. And actually, it is more stable also.

  • #192956
    Avatarcomposite1
    Member

    Chad,

    I agree that if you’re not particularly tech savvy at this time to go with a pre-built system. It will cost you a bit more up front but the basic peace of mind you’ll get with competent tech support will make it initially worth it.

    Whatever brand you get (Dell, HP, Gateway and Sony) make sure it’s a) a workstation not a home computer and b) the hardware is optimized for video. Vegas is optimized for AMD CPU’s so you should consider a system with that line first though it does work with Intel’s as well. Since you have some cash to throw at it, you may want to extend your projected budget to $3k because as was mentioned earlier ‘you’ll have to pay for the extras’. The things you simply must have for a system capable of working with HD format are at least 1 Duo Core CPU (I recommend a Quad or better), 4GB DDR2 RAM (I recommend 8 or better. DDR3 is faster but maxes at 6GB) and at least 1 GPU with 512MB overclocked RAM (I recommend 2 512’s or 1 1GB. Be advised: 1GB cards are huge and start at $1k if bought separately but will be more expensive when bought from one of the big firms.) Also, you want at least 3 harddrives. 1 for your OS, 1 for video and 1 to store audio and graphics. Ideally, you’d want as many as could fit in the case to make 1 internal raid and have separate drives for audio, graphics and authoring. Another thing to consider is to partition your C: drive so that one portion is purely for the OS, Programs and the infinite updates, your immediate documents and to decrease the amount of time your system needs to defrag. Another benefit is the partition can be used as a back up for documents, project folders and whatever. I can’t tell you how many times having a partition saved valuable information when a C: drive had to be reformatted in order to get the system back online. The reason I recommend the above company’s is because they make ‘multimedia’ specific workstations and they’ll say so in their descriptions. Before you decide which brand you want, go to each company’s site and virtually ‘build your own’ through their customizing section. That way you can get a good idea of how much you’re going to need to spend to get they type of system you want. Just remember the more stuff you want in it the more it’s going to cost. Keep in mind that you will want to buy a support plan and pay those nasty shipping and tax fees!

    On your workstation insist upon Vista Business 64-bit SP1 (I don’t think it comes in any other version.) You absolutely do not need all of the extras that come with Ultimate and you need the controls that don’t come with Home Premium. Win7 is still in Beta so hold off on it.

    Last but certainly not least. Don’t forget the support gear you’ll need for your snazzy new system. There’s no excuse not to have 2 monitors for an NLE (or a widescreen LCD.), You’ll want to get an editing specific keyboard (Bella makes some nice one’s compatible with Vegas), a good optical mouse and most important, a UPS capable of supporting your system with adequate backup power. Then there’s good speakers, etc., etc…..

    Even when buying a pre-built system, you’ll still have to do solid research in order to make the best choice you can.

  • #192957
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    Chad,

    Cineform NeoScene converts AVCHD for use with Vegas or Premiere.

    From the Videoguys’ website:

    http://www.videoguys.com/Item/CineForm+Neo+Scene+PC/54E4543435F454E4.aspx

    Norman

  • #192958
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    Hi Chad.

    If you check the Videoguys website, they say that HP computers are the way to go. They say they cost more up front, but they are optimized for video. Apparently they say that the same thing is not true for Dell.

    I have had excellent experiences with Dell, but if HP’s are optimized for video, then I would think that is one good way to go. The other video specialty houses (Core Micro, Safe Harbor, etc.) should also be excellent.

    Best of success.

    Norman

  • #192959
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Yeah, I also have an HP that is over 5 yrs old, and I can still use it for editing and capture. They will never fail you, and I will forever be an HP fan.

  • #192960
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    >>Yeah, I also have an HP that is over 5 yrs old, and I can still use it for editing and capture. They will never fail you, and I will forever be an HP fan.

    Why did you purchase a Gateway, then?

  • #192961
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Because my HP is a desktop, and is starting to show its age at times. Most importantly though, The HP has only a single gig of ddr ram and a single core processor. One of my cams records in AVCHD and the HP can’t handle it.

  • #192962
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive
    1. Vegas is NOT beginner software… some people are just sooo mis-informed because they have never used the software.
    2. Vegas fully supports AVCHD, has for a while now – see comment 1.

    If your budget is $2500-$5000, you’ve got plenty of options. So here’s my rundown for Vegas. CPU Cores – the more the better. Ram, get as much as the operating system you will use will allow. You don’t need a mega video card, but will definitely want one with at least 256 mb ram. Hard drives – 1 for system, 1 for video files minimum.

    I don’t know if you have the stand alone Vegas Pro 8 or the bundle that comes with DVD Architect (you need DVD Architect to render ac3 audio files)

    Vegas is strong, stable software that will provide you with most of the tools you need to produce… and the price point vs other software out there is even more attractive.

    Happy Editing.

    John

  • #192963
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Hey Guys,

    After looking for the past 2 days trying to find the Best Configuration for a computer to run Vegas 8, I found this article:

    http://www.videoguys.com/Guide/E/Videoguys+System+recommendations+for+Video+Editing/0x4aebb06ba071d2b6a2cd784ce243a6c6.aspx

    I will probably will call them and get some suggestions. I am guessing norman, you got the same info from that article about HP that I also did. I am also looking at some turnkey systems, do you guys have any suggestions on websites to go to? I found http://www.adkvideoediting.com/ Do these guys have a good rep and support? I would like to add some more, but I gotta go, family is needing me.

    Thank you,

    Chad

  • #192964
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    Chad,

    If this list of customers is accurate, then they are a very reputable firm.

    http://www.adkvideoediting.com/clients2.cfm

    My only concern is that they only offer support M-F, normal business hours, and then check emails on weekends. They also offer only two years of support. Is it hardware only, or software and hardware? And will that meet your needs?

    If you can hold on to your wallet, give them a call. Then please let me know if they were pushy, or if they were helpful. Their systems sure look good.

    You might also try JNCS.com.

    Norman

  • #192965
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Well I just called The Video Guys and they were not much help at all with my questions. I am disappointed. I feel like I could have gotten better answers from my dog.

  • #192966
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    I just got done talking to ADK Video Editing and I finally found what I was looking for. I talked to Dave and He was very helpful. He also suggested to talk to Eric about different media formats and cameras that work with Vegas. I am very excited, because I found a place that is helpful and not trying to push me to buy something more expensive than what is suited for my needs. In fact, Dave said Vegas will do the samething that Avid Media Composer does. I was very impressed, because he suggested vegas over avid!!!! So I told them I will call them Monday or Tuesday to figure out what is the best configuration for Vegas and buy it. Norman I can’t remember if it was this thread or the To Build or Not to Build thread, but yes I am a man of faith and I have been praying for this whole process. Thank you for your prayers on this. Thank you everybody for all or your replies and information! I will probably start a new thread on what is the best HD Camera to get for Vegas next week. I just want to take it one day at a time and just let it happen.

    Thank you,

    Chad

  • #192967
    Avatarcomposite1
    Member

    “Thank you everybody for all or your replies and information! I will
    probably start a new thread on what is the best HD Camera to get for
    Vegas next week. I just want to take it one day at a time and just let
    it happen.”

    Chad,

    You’re welcome for whatever small contribution I may have made to your search for answers. Oh and the guy who suggested Vegas over Avid is correct on some points and not on others. Just to name a few if you want to load your software and get rolling with professional edits for less than 2k on software, the Sony pro suite is the 500lb gorilla in the room (Vegas Pro, Sound Forge, Acid, Cinescore.) Provided you have a computer constructed specifically for video editing that makes Vegas a stronger choice. With the Vegas suite you can do some pretty strong broadcast quality post-work hands down. For more serious finishing work you will need some third-party programs like AFX, Boris and Zaxwerks to do solid motion graphics work. You can ‘getto’ your way through mographic work with many of the tools in Vegas using keyframes and bezier’ curves however, but it’s way more work and it takes buttloads of skill just to make something that is passable. Lot’s of pro’s use Vegas (me being one) so it’s definitely the real deal. Avid however, can go places and do things Vegas is yet to go. Not only can you do small scale productions with Avid, you can go full on decamillion budget extravaganza with it (despite what the FCP weenies say, most movies get cut on Avid. The first Digital Films and the first fully HD films got cut on Avid not FCP.) Why? Because Avid has the built-in tools and support hardware to do those things. The drawback for the small-scale operator? Money. Though an Avid array is infinitely more affordable these days (I remember when you couldn’t look at a barebones Media Composer rig for less than $50k) at the lowest level they’re still a significant expense ($10k just for MC software and a Mojo DX converter alone.) When Vegas can support hardware acceleration, do full RT effects natively, and can fully support online networked arrays it will have fully arrived. I do look forward to that day, I just hope they remember to keep it affordable!

    Actually, you don’t need to start a thread for which cameras to use with Vegas. Upfront the best cameras for Vegas are Sony cameras. Out of the box Vegas has full support for all of their digital based cameras. Probably way more with Vegas than FCP. However, most of the major prosumer and pro brand cameras are supported by Vegas. We use JVC and Canon with no prob. I hear Vegas 9 now has support for Red One in 2K. Plus Vegas supports nearly all of the other available formats from mini-dv to XDCAM HD. So your choice of camera will fall squarely within your circle of budget, skillset and creativity no matter what brand.

  • #192968
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Composite 1, which JVC and Canon Models do you have, why did you choose them versus other cameras, and when did you purchase them?

  • #192969
    Avatarcomposite1
    Member

    “which JVC and Canon Models do you have, why did you choose them versus other cameras, and when did you purchase them?”

    Chad,

    We currently use the JVC GYHD200UB and the Canon XL1s model cameras. I’ve been sold on the XL series since Canon loaned my old Unit a couple to take out into the field back in ’98. They were light got great images, could do most of the things our hardcore pro models did and take a butt whuppin’ in the process. I personall think the XL1s is Canon’s hands down best rig despite it not being able to do progressive scan and HD. Unlike the XL1 and those that followed after it, the XL1s could be tricked out with secondary components also sold by canon to take it from the prosumer to hardcore pro level. All the cameras since can’t do that which sucks. We use the 200UB because in ’07 I was at a conference and shot my mouth off about JVC lending me their latest rig to make my next movie. They said “Okay.” They sponsored all the camera gear and part of the load of stuff was a fresh out of the box GYHD250. It was a pro camera from front to back and a dream to work with. Though it was a ‘Low res’ HD camera at 720p the imagery in both HD and DV were ‘Effen’ phenomenal and it could also take a whuppin’ and still keep going. When came time to get one we didn’t need the extra SDI connections so the 200 was the next best thing. Same camera without the SDI connections. We’ve been shooting with it for the last year and it is the real McCoy.

    I checked out other cameras like the XH1, AVHGX and the Z1U. I dug the XH1 but it was too pricey, front heavy, had that goofy 24f thing (that many nle’s didn’t support at the time) and had issues with configuration like I mentioned earlier. I wasn’t impressed with the AVHGX because it felt more like a toy than a straight up pro camera. I did like the combo of tape or cards but those P2 cards were (and are) too expensive to be bothered with despite how much people rave about them. Imagery was okay and I liked the many formats it could shoot in, but the controls were annoying and the hype about it was too. I would have rolled with the Z1U but I know Sony from waaaaay back. The make good gear, but their tech support is hit or miss and they have a nasty habit of completely abandoning a format whether it works or not. Also, it couldn’t do progressive scan in favor of interlaced video. 1080i looks cool, but I am sick up and fed with editing interlaced video for DVD and the ‘Net.

    Hope that answered your questions.

  • #192970
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    >>Norman I can’t remember if it was this thread or the To Build or Not to Build thread, but yes I am a man of faith and I have been praying for this whole process. Thank you for your prayers on this. Thank you everybody for all or your replies and information! I will probably start a new thread on what is the best HD Camera to get for Vegas next week. I just want to take it one day at a time and just let it happen.

    Hi Chad.

    I am glad to hear that, and will keep you in prayer. As long as you keep listening, He will keep guiding.

    You can probably tell that Comp knows a lot more about this stuff than I do. I would give his recommendations a lot more weight than mine, but it can alsosometimes be good to get the perspective from another beginner, because I talk in beginner’s terms.

    Sony Vegas is good in that it handles all formats. One of the things about Vegas is that they are an ‘all in one’, whereas the Adobe and Vegas packages have more ‘speciality’ tools. Sony also has specialty tools, but there is nothing you cannot begin with in Vegas; and as Comp says, the price is very reasonable.

    I am starting with Sony, but am also keeping my mind open to the idea ofadding Adobe and thenAvid as time goes on. One reason for picking Sony as a starting point was that I already had it (I bought it and our cameras for someone who was going to help, but who then flaked out on me), and also because it is supposed to be the easiest thing to initially learn. I will say that I am getting a ton of good information from the Class On Demand Vegas 4.0 Editing Workshop with Douglas Spotted Eagle.

    http://www.amazon.com/Demand-Douglas-Spotted-Editing-Workshop/dp/B00009XFQM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1241368626&sr=8-1

    It is expensive, but it helps get one up to speed very quickly. Training is invaluable, and I would think that if you would go through that, it will put you a cut above some who have never taken any kind of instruction, because he really digs in and hits some specifics. Highly recommended.

    Depending on the kind of work you are hoping to do, I would start with Sony Vegas, and then keep an open mind towards adding more tools as you go. Sound Forge is excellent for creating surround sound work. Acid Pro is excellent for creating your own musical pieces (although you can do that in Vegas as well…just more so in Acid). Cinescore will help you add Midi-type music to you productions, say if you do wedding videos.

    Just let me say here that Sony is optimized for AMD chips. I chose Intel chips, however, because Sony also works on Intel, and the other software that I eventually hope to migrate to (i.e., Premiere, Avid) is optimized for Intel.

    I read on another forum that Sony cameras and Sony Creative Software do not necessarily talk with each other. They are two separate companies underneath the Sony umbrella. I heard that Sony makes excellent cameras, but they do not necessarily work any better with Vegas than any other brand.(One of the things that Sony focuses on is interoperability withall formats.)

    You can get lots of different camera types. DV=SD =standard definition. I would avoid that.

    HD is different than HDV is different then AVCHD (flash memory). I do not know your budget, but if you can afford it, try to get a professional grade model with XLR (pro microphone) hookups. The overall quality will be higher, and you can do more with it as timegoes on.Avoid 720i or 720p (lower resolution). Avoid 1080i (interlaced). Try to find 1080p. There is a debate about tape versus flash. If you go tape, you have to feed the tape in, which means you can get to work on it slower. Also, the tapes cost. However, then you have the tape there as a backup. If you go AVCHD (flash and hard disk drive) then you can get started almost right away (just hookyour camcorder to your machine). However, then you have to burn the data to tape, or else keep it all on hard drives (which is way more expensive than tape: and hard drives [hdd’s] fail). So that is a toss-up, but I am not unhappy with tape at all. Just use a good quality HDV tape (which is thicker than SD/DV tape). I get mine from http://www.tapeonline.com. They seem to have the best prices. Shipping is not ultra-swift, so just be sure to order a little ahead.

    Just so I’ve told you, if I had to purchase a smaller, less expensive camcorder right now, I would probably purchase a Canon Vixia HG21 in AVCHD,but only because I already have redundant hdd (hard drive) backup, and can also burn backups to tape via my other camcorder.

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B001DTXK8G/ref=nosim/tirebouchon-20

    I read in a magazine (Videography) that AVCHD is a slightly cleaner picture than HDV; so since the quality is better, and quality is the main thing, I would find some way to jump through the hoopsof backing it up. You can also purchase anti-static hdd cases, and then get a ‘toaster’ hdd dock.

    http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=3516746&CatId=2785

    However, if you are on a budget then you might want to research an HDV camcorder, because then you have the initial tape footage for backup (in case something goes down…which it eventually will), and also you can also burn the final project to tape.

    As CraftersOfLight said, you will get about a bazillion opinions on what is best, so of course, the main thing is just to keep on praying, and let Him guide you day by day.

    Norman

  • #192971
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    Hi Comp.

    >>Also, it couldn’t do progressive scan in favor of interlaced video. 1080i looks cool, but I am sick up and fed with editing interlaced video for DVD and the ‘Net.

    It isa long story, but we got our camera gear back when 1080i was the thing. I have an HDR-FX1 for the main camera, with a JuicedLink CX-231 (or something) to clean up the audio inputs (because the FX1 is supposed to have a lot of hiss, unless one bypasses it). Then I plan to feed in with a Sony HDR-HC1 (so I don’t have to take my teleprompter setup apart).

    What is the deal with 1080i? Why is it a hassle/pain? I bought the Cineform NeoScene codec converter, which is supposed to convert all footage to .avi.

    <h4 class=”header15″>Description:</h4>
    <p class=”softwareDescription”>

    With Neo Scene you will convert your difficult-to-edit HDV or AVCHD camera footage to CineForm AVI files and then benefit from the same theatrical quality format and real-time editing performance as professionals.

    I would love to upgrade to 1080p, but I just don’t have the money right now. What is the deal with 1080i, and do you suppose the Cineform codec will take care of the problem?

    Thank you,

    Norman

  • #192972
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Well, to tell you guys where I am coming fromabout cameras, I have been a Sony guy for the longest time, but Iam not necessarilytied down to them. I own a Sony PD-150 that I bought from B and H photo and Video in 2001. It was between the 150, the Canon XL-1s, and the Canon GL1. Iworked with the XL-1s andthe GL1, I hated the picture quality of the Canons, the XL-1s was expensive and to me very flimsy. The GL1 had I believe automatic focus or something like that and that was a major turnoff for me. Iused my pd-150from 2001 to 2004 and it was great. In fact, I was visiting my friend in Yuma, Arizona and I dropped my 150 at waist level ona cement street. It survived and it is built like a Brick! I then got a job as a News Photojournalist in June 2004 in Reno. I used a Sony Betacam SP Camera that I am guessing was probaly over 15 years old, because it kept on breaking down. I then went to a station in Phoenix in Jan tuary 2005 as a NewsPhotojournalist and I shot ona Sony Betacam SX Camera until May 2008. So since May 2008 til August 2008, I used my PD-150 for Freelance News Stories I shot for all of thelocal stations in Phoenix, CNN, and the Weather Channel. I then moved to Denver in October tried to do a career change going into sales or hospitality.No luck, it didn’t help theeconomystarted the downfall in October.So after 6 months of looking, I realized I need to make an opportunity for myself. I knew I didn’t want to go back into news, because the hoursare 24/7 and holidays. Plus I got shot at 12 times at a police scene once,but thankfully they were a bad shot and I didn’t get hit.

    Iwill finishthis replytomorrow, I am sorry I stopped in midparagraph, but I need to goto bed. Have a Good Night!

  • #192973
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    >>I own a Sony PD-150 that I bought from B and H photo and Video in 2001.

    Hi Chad.

    I did not realize that you already had a good quality SD/DV camera. If you already own a competent DV camera, then may I please ask you to tell me again what are the exact qualities/specifications you are looking for?

    In other words, when you say “best camera”, best for what? Are you looking for HDV, AVCHD, more SD/DV? What do you envision yourself doing? Do you envisionwedding videography, mographics work, COPS/Reality TV, moto-cross, indie filmmaking: what?

    What do you believe is your budget?

    Also, have you checked out the camera reviews on this website?

    I hope this is helpful.

    Norman

  • #192974
    Avatarcomposite1
    Member

    “Iworked with the XL-1s andthe GL1, I hated the picture quality of the Canons, the XL-1s was expensive and to me very flimsy.”

    Chad,

    Hmm, I worked with some folks who hated the XL1s imagery (but they were comparing it to a $20k DVCPRO rig which was a different level of camera.) You’re the first I ever heard say it was expensive and ‘flimsy’. Yeah, I guess compared to the $70k Betacams and DigiBetas I used to work with it would seem flimsy. However, I field tested an XL1 during some military operations and that thing got wet, dirty, banged up and still kept rollin’. However, you have to shoot a military camera operator before they’ll ‘drop a rig’ and they might not do it then! We still have the first XL1s I purchased back in ’02 and that thing has been used from the freezing temps of a blizzard to the hellish heat of a steel mill. Now I might have felt the way you did if we hadn’t outfitted it with a pro rig of a shoulder mount and monochrome viewfinder. We got all the lenses except for the 14x and even have an Night Vision setup for it. Despite it being ‘old tech’ it will be ‘on active duty’ until it falls apart. The inital body and 16x Stabilized lens purchase was less expensive than cameras of comparable configuration today. All those extras did add up.Had we went with a much higher-end camera we would have gotten only the body and maybe a lens for what we paid for all the add-ons.

    I’m really happy with the JVC’s. Norman said to ‘avoid 720p’, but Ihappen to like it. 720p is perfect for making films that go straight to DVD. Obviously, 1080p is a higher res image, but not that many people have migrated to Blu-Ray (I still say HDD was better) and the tech moving to Blu-Ray is moving slowly forward. That and as I’ve mentioned, Sony is notorious for abandoning a format. If the move to Blu-Ray as a standard takes much longer, watch out. Also, I like the choice of resolutions. 720p projects don’t take up as much harddrive space as a 1080p one will. Then too, who are you making the project for? Unless your client is capable of broadcasting or otherwise distributing such high format projects (and can pay for their production) what are you going to do with it? JVC’s latest rig give the option of doing 720p or 1080p (something Panasonic has offered since ’07) so I’m giving it a serious look.

    As far as getting shot at, been there, done that, here’s your ballcap and t-shirt. Welcome to the club. When the aircraft your shooting from gets targeted for missile fire, give me a call and you’ll get the ‘secret handshake’.

  • #192975
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    >>I’m really happy with the JVC’s. Norman said to ‘avoid 720p’, but Ihappen to like it. 720p is perfect for making films that go straight to DVD. Obviously, 1080p is a higher res image, but not that many people have migrated to Blu-Ray (I still say HDD was better) and the tech moving to Blu-Ray is moving slowly forward. That and as I’ve mentioned, Sony is notorious for abandoning a format. If the move to Blu-Ray as a standard takes much longer, watch out. Also, I like the choice of resolutions. 720p projects don’t take up as much harddrive space as a 1080p one will. Then too, who are you making the project for? Unless your client is capable of broadcasting or otherwise distributing such high format projects (and can pay for their production) what are you going to do with it? JVC’s latest rig give the option of doing 720p or 1080p (something Panasonic has offered since ’07) so I’m giving it a serious look.

    Hi Comp.

    If you know720p and you like it, then that’s the bottom line as far as I am concerned.

    I’m not trying to contradict you in anything, I am just hoping tohelp Chad with some general advice. And you know way more about thisstuff than I do. My only thought was that 1080p is a littlebit more ‘future proof’; at least until they raise the standards to 2K in 2015.

    Norman

  • #192976
    Avatarcomposite1
    Member

    Norman,

    No ‘contradiction’ perceived. ‘Future proofing’ is hard to do, futile and expensive. Most of the folks that ask questions on these posts are newbies to intermediate types. Trying not to get caught between the manufacturer’s and their ‘predetermined’ format changes is hard enough for pro’s. I can tell you most of the people jumping on the 1080p train haven’t mastered 720p or 1080i yet! Your average bride looking for wedding video or client looking for training/event video don’t have the capacity to understand, can pay for or care about hi-res HD video. Not to mention unless you’re up to speed on Blu-ray authoring, can deliver a digital ‘print’ on harddrive for projection or upload properly compressed HD video to online servers you’re ‘spinnin’ your wheels.’ Now if you’re doing this for a living and have the client base you believe has or is making the transition to hi-res HD, then yeah run with it. Because, if you don’t you can shoot your stuff in hi-res but you’re going to have to down-res it to SD anyway. Also, storage and archiving of hi-res footage is a real issue. Storing on Blu-ray Disc and ‘client drives’ are the current options but for the person just getting started, those are expensive options outside of the ‘trust fund’ set. Case in point: You and I both did a collective ‘drool’ over HP’s Z800. But unless you have the resources on hand to support such a rig and the clientele to purchase such high-end output, it doesn’t make sense to get one.

    So no, I didn’t perceive any contraditiction. Good advice/info comes from all angles. Speaking of which check the ‘build or not….’ thread for the answer I got about the Multi-bridge Pro.

  • #192977
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    Hi Comp.

    I appreciate the information on the MBP on the other thread.

    I never did understand why ‘they’ ditched HD-DVD. Why take something affordable (that people would probably use) and replace it with something that is unaffordable, that no one is using? I just don’t get it. I would have happily used HD-DVD, as it would have been perfect for what I am doing.

    I should let you know, though, that I may have a different ‘client base’ than most.Essentially I am making training videos and documentaries for our members’ use, both for now and in the future. The plan is to make the videos available at cost through a print on demand house, and also to make a self-extracting .iso file available for purchase on the web. Basically we only plan to charge cost, and no profit (since our ethics rules say we are supposed to survive on donations only). Then we also want to upload the video to YouTube, Veoh, Vimeo, Metacafe and Mogulus in whatever formats they have (SD, HQ, and HD), and then to embed these videos on our website, so that Vimeo or YouTube (or someone else) carries the bandwidth.

    Eventually, I expect the resolution standards togo higher, and I’d really rather not have to re-record, unless I have to. What that means to me, in practical terms, is that if I both record, burn, uploadand archive in both SD and HD now, then whatever format they ultimately come out with (HD-DVD, Blu-Ray, Flash media, or whatever), all I have to do is to figure out how to cut it over to the appropriate format.

    I wish my machine was 1080p, but 1080i is probably good enough; plus we already have it, and we are flat out of budget for new equipment. So my present plan is toburn,edit, upload, embed, distribute, and also archive in as high of resolution as possible.I understand that HDV tape isa decent archiving format,soI will probablymake two or three copies of HDV tape, and then store them in different locations.

    It is an excellent point you make aboutBlu-Ray. I am not presently aware of anyPrint-On-Demand Blu-ray facility; and if people are not using that format (because of cost), then why invest in a burner? Why not just archive back to HDV tape, and then wait for whatever format eventually actually takes off?

    The Matrox will work for me on this machine, and for right now, because I have an HDV camera (although it is only 1080i, and not 1080p), and with the economy looking like it is, I will probably have it for a long, long time. So that is what I have, so I had better get used to it. But maybe some day I will get blessed with a 2K machine! And then I will also needa new computer….anda Mojo….hrmm….

    So for right now I am just happy that I am finally getting time to dig into the Douglas Spotted Eagle training DVD, because it means I am getting closer to being able to actually get started. I have been looking forward to this for a very long time, and now that it is almost here it is scary.

    Norman

  • #192978
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    <h2>Here are some more cameras I have been looking at:
    </h2>
    <h2>JVC GY-HM700 HD</h2>

    http://www.b-roll.net/today/2009/03/philip-bloom-and-the-jvc-gy-hm700-hd/

    <span style=”font-size: x-small;”><span style=”font-size: small;”>Panasonic AG-HPX300</span></span>

    <span style=”font-size: x-small;”><span style=”font-size: small;”>http://philipbloom.co.uk/reviews/cvp-tv-review-of-panasonic-hpx-301e/</span></span>

    <span style=”font-size: x-small;”><span style=”font-size: small;”>http://www.b-roll.net/today/2009/02/hpx30/
    </span></span>

    <span style=”font-size: x-small;”><span style=”font-size: small;”>
    </span></span>

    <span style=”font-size: x-small;”><span style=”font-size: small;”>I will have some others tomorrow
    </span></span>

  • #192979
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    Chad,

    This latest post of yours gives me a completely different picture of who you are, and what you are going for. Please correct me if I am wrong: your total budget is not 5K$: your computer/software/NLE budget is 5K$, and your camera budget is more than that?

    All of these cameras are ‘next gen’ for me. I have a distant dream of owning a P2 (HPX-300), but at the moment I do not have budget, and cannot justify the cost. At the moment I am just planning some lightly composited ‘educational apologetics’ type videos for our organization, which my little3CCD HDR-FX1 palmcorder-and-teleprompter setup will probably handle just fine, but this is interesting stuff for me to learn about.

    Just to give you a better sense of who I am (and what experience I do not yet have), here is my A camera:

    http://www.videomaker.com/article/10594/

    And here is my B camera/tape-feed unit:

    http://www.videomaker.com/article/12070/

    From what little I see,the cameras you are looking at here look really, really good (I am thinking the HPX-301e is the same camera as the HPX-300). Personally I liked the reviews of the Panasonic HPX-300 the best; however I may be biased, as I have had my distant sights on aP2 camera for some time.At the moment my main challenge is just to get my head wrapped around Sony Vegas (and its ‘Production Assistant), and then Boris Red (and then Adobe CS4, etceteras). Then after that I need to figure out my lighting configuration for my greenscreen, butthat is another matter.

    Speaking completely out of ignorance, I liked the HPX-300 best, but Comp will surely know more. However, you may have something specific in mind.

    Norman

  • #192980
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    Hi Chad.

    If anyone still things Vegas is not a pro-grade NLE, it now supports Red One and 4K.

    This from the Videoguys’ latest emailing:

    NEW! Support for Gigapixel-Size Pictures
    With Vegas Pro 9 software you can pan, scan, and crop extremely large images to create a movie sequence while maintaining HD resolution. Vegas Pro 9 software also supports video stills from professional-level camcorders and still cameras that take stitch multiple pictures together to form a large single image.

    NEW!
    Enhanced Native XDCAM and AVCHD Support
    The new Device Explorer feature enables users to quickly browse the contents of both XDCAM EX devices and AVCHD cameras, allowing users to selectively import files and use them natively, without conversion to an intermediate format. Vegas Pro 9 also allows users to directly capture XDCAM-compatible MXF files from supported SD/HDSDI sources. The new capture-compress function allows broadcast editors to convert their legacy SD or HD tape-based material, including Digital Betacam, HDCAM, and DVCPRO 100, into high-quality, IT-friendly MXF clips conforming to the Sony XDCAM MPEG2 standard.

    NEW!
    Open and Edit RED ONE Files on the Timeline
    Vegas Pro 9 software has advanced support for 4K workflows, including support for RED ONE files.

    I still think you made a good move by starting with Vegas 8.1 (64 bit), and then upgrading to Vegas Pro 9 once they come out with the first service pack (9.0a or 9.1a), which will provide much beefier support on the back end.

    I hope that helps.

    Norman

  • #192981
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    That is Great to see Norman! Hey I am sorry I haven’t been real active on the thread lately, but I have gotten busy this week and this next wweek my brother will be in town, so I willget back to the thread when I get some time. Have a Great Day!

    Chad

  • #192982
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    NP.

    Whatever/whenever is best for you. Talk with you then.

    Norman

  • #192983
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    This thread has been extremely helpful. I also thought I would throw another angle at it. I have found that I have the need to do alot of editing on the road so I am looking for a laptop to edit using Vegas Pro 8.0.

    I was about to purchase an HP with the following specs but that I would get all your opinions first…

    Windows Vista 64 Bit

    Intel Core 2 Duo Processor T9550

    4GB DDR2 System Memory

    500 GB 5400RPM SATA Hard Drive

    1 GB NVidia Ge Force GT 130M

    16″ HD Screen

    Thoughts?????

  • #192984
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    The basic chassis looks good, but I would look for a 7200RPM drive.

    I would also purchase aftermarket memory, as HP laptop memory is notoriously slow.

    The main advantage of x64 bits is to add memory, so I do not know how much advantage x64 will give you over x32, but it should give some.

    Also consider adding 4GB ReadyBoost RAM (a fast flash card).

    And I do not know your budget, but Dell makes workstations that handle more than 4GB of RAM, which is where the real advantage of x64 is found.

    http://www.dell.com/content/products/productdetails.aspx/workstation-precision-m6400?c=us&l=en&s=bsd&cs=04&~oid=us~en~4~workstation-precision-m6400_anav2~~

    I hope that helps.

    Norman

  • #192985
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    That does help…I guess it would help to know the budget which is around 1500. I agree on the 7200 but it would only allow me the 7200 at 320 GB vs the 500 GB at 5400…

  • #192986
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive
  • #192987
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    >>That does help…I guess it would help to know the budget which is around 1500. I agree on the 7200 but it would only allow me the 7200 at 320 GB vs the 500 GB at 5400…

    OK, it does help a lot to know your budget.

    Are you looking at an external hdd for data, or are you needing to do it all on one internal drive? I would strongly recommend getting an external drive for data, and as fast as you can. Even if you cannot afford it right now, you could always migrate that way.

    Data is huge. If youget a machine with a1394 (Firewire) port (which is fairly standard),an external firewire drive for data will really speed things up for you.

    I hope that helps.

    Norman

  • #192988
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Yeah I actually already have a number of external hard drives that I will be using for data storage..the only storage on the laptop will be current projects so to limit the load on the road…

  • #192989
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    OK.

    But if you are going to store data on an external drive, then why do you need 500GB internal?

    Why not take the 320GB internal, and get the speed?

    Norman

  • #192990
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Great Point on the one I just constructed I went with the 500 and 7200…tried to outline above but it doesnt look like it came through very good…2.53 ghz, 6 GB DDR3 System Memory, 1GB NVidia Graphics Card and an 18″ monitor…a little more than the budgeted amount but at 1700 it’s a good buy?

  • #192991
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    >>Yeah I actually already have a number of external hard drives that I will be using for data storage..the only storage on the laptop will be current projects so to limit the load on the road…

    Wait. Are you planning on reading and writing to C:, and you also have the operating system and NLE on C:?

    Or are you putting all data on D: external (which is the recommended option)?

    Norman

  • #192992
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    >>Great Point on the one I just constructed I went with the 500 and 7200…tried to outline above but it doesnt look like it came through very good…2.53 ghz, 6 GB DDR3 System Memory, 1GB NVidia Graphics Card and an 18″ monitor…a little more than the budgeted amount but at 1700 it’s a good buy?

    It looks good to me, but unless you have to move on it today, I would also get some advice from some of the more senior editors. Ultimately it is your choice, and personal preference, but they will know much more than I do.

    Norman

  • #192993
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Not sure I know exactly what you mean. Generally Iwill capture onto an external hard drivethrough my desktop andmost likely bring that with meto use with the lap top…is that what you’d recommend? Again I really appreciate the help!

  • #192994
    AvatarNormanWillis
    Participant

    >>Not sure I know exactly what you mean. Generally Iwill capture onto an external hard drivethrough my desktop andmost likely bring that with meto use with the lap top…is that what you’d recommend? Again I really appreciate the help!

    What I mean is that I am just a beginning editor. I would think that unless you need to purchase today, I would wait until some guys like Comp and Crafters have had time to give you their input, as they know more than I do. But your proposed system looks good to me.

    I understand about the need to edit while traveling.

    Norman

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