How to fog a pond

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    • #48694
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      How would one go about putting a low mist over a section of a pond? I have shot where someone walks backward into a pond and we will reverse it in post so it looks the guy walks out dry. I would like to cover my ankles or a little higher in mist or fog.

      Thanks

    • #199665
      AvatarEarlC
      Member

      Seems any one of a number of fog machines is in order – heated fogs or chilled fogs come to mind. But the chilled fog machine helps create thick clouds of fog that lay close to the surface and dissipate as they rise. These are usually created using dry ice or liquid nitrogen.

      Heated units use some kind of inert gas or an electric pump to push mineral oil, glycol or some other combination that is vaporized and turned into fog or mist. You would of course need a power source to use this more common system that can often be rented or purchased outright for fairly reasonable prices. Also, the handling of these units is probably less accident prone than the chilled system.

      If you worked it right, rigged your spots and/or other lighting right to generate the erie effect you probably want, and react quickly enough, you could get a good burst or so from the heated fog to provide the effect you’re looking for. That, or using several units to lay out a huge volume and start action and rolling before it begins to rise and dissipate.

    • #199666
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks, I was toying with the idea of twomachines and running pcv pipes with periodic holes drilled into them and floating them (with children’s floaters for swimming) into the pond. To convoluted?

    • #199667
      Avatarcomposite1
      Member

      Speedy,

      Do it in post. When you shoot block your shots off to allow room for you to put a ‘fog effect’ in when using compositing software like AFX or in your NLE software. To get a good idea of how you can ‘Do it in post’, go to videocopilot.net and look at the many visual fx tutorials. I do believe there’s even one on how to do fog. Save your money and building time. If not, you’ll need lots of dry ice, calm winds and locations willing to allow you to put a large enough contraption up to make it all work.

    • #199668
      AvatarEarlC
      Member

      Sounds possible, Speedy. Could be fun and an interesting experience/experiment as well. And, there is Mr. Porter’s suggestion to do it in post.

    • #199669
      Avatarbirdcat
      Participant

      If you’re willing to do it in post, take a look at Particle Illusion – http://www.wondertouch.com/

    • #199670

      birdcat, thanks for that site–I, too, will check that out. From what I can tell, it’s loaded. Now, I WANT TO FILM A GUY COMING OUT OF THE WATER IN THE FOG. (I’ll have to come up with a reason to do so…).

    • #199671
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I’ll look at the sites for sure, ThoughI do like practical very much! Thanks guys.

      This is my third short (two of whivh were o.k. and one was a $7,000train wreck ) and scared me away for ten years. Now I remember why. After about 50 hrs ofpre-prod andcasting I had to call the rental house to ask a question about a lens and they guy told me that he has been closed for over a month and didn’t take the web ste downfor people who had reservations before he closed. SO now I have items that I can’t rent in Boston and have to go to way more expensive rental house toget stuff.That means My intitail shoot dates are gone and I loose my perfect actress!One big false start andI look like an IDIOT.

    • #199672
      Avatarcomposite1
      Member

      Speedy,

      Rental Houses (when they stay open) are great for supplemental gear that you couldn’t afford otherwise ( I mean really who keeps a set of Panavision Primes in their closet?) But for down and dirty ‘Insurgent Filmmaking’ you really need your own gear (or much as you can get!) That means on hand you should have at least a prosumer rig (if you’re serious about shooting) and one or two consumer ‘crash cam’s’ of a similar format to cover extra angles as needed, a basic sound kit, lights (again basic works) and for heaven’s sake a desktop or laptop capable of doing Non-Linear Editing without blowing up. With that basic setup you can get a whole lot done. Anything extra needed can be begged, borrowed or rented (when the house stays open that is.)

    • #199673
      Avatarbirdcat
      Participant

      ???I mean really who keeps a set of Panavision Primes in their closet?

      They’re in the garage silly – The closet is too cluttered!

      Seriously though, I have five really good 35mm (Canon – heavy glass) lenses left over from my pro photog days that I will get an adapter for one day…

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