How do you make video not look like video?

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    • #37105
      Avatarjohnny
      Participant

      I have a cheap Panasonic camcorder GS-19 (I believe). Nice home camcorder. Is it possible to shoot video that doesn’t look like video with it? By that I mean the difference between a live broadcast and film. And maybe I’m just wrong, but when I look at the difference in a live tv broadcast on fox or cnn and then watch a documentary on PBS, the interviews don’t look like live video, like my cam, they look, well different, and I don’t know what that style or method is called.

      I hope this makes sense. Thanks for any help on this.

    • #164470
      Avatarbirdcat
      Participant

      You could downconvert after the fact to 24p which will give it more of a film look.

      You could also apply some filters from folks like Magic Bullet which can radically alter the look of the footage.

    • #164471
      Avatarjohnny
      Participant

      birdcat Wrote:

      You could downconvert after the fact to 24p which will give it more of a film look.

      You could also apply some filters from folks like Magic Bullet which can radically alter the look of the footage.

      I guess a better question is why does it look different on television the live versus not live. The 24fps?

    • #164472
      AvatarTin_Man
      Participant

      well johnny,

      you can get 1000 post on this and many different answers, you can read for days and formulate your own opinion.

      having said that, i have done both and been where u are. bottom line is consumer cameras are just that consumer grade. 1 small CCD that tries and gives the user a simple point and shoot and give them the best overall image they can.

      15 years ago, I bought the first Hi8 sony camcorder for 1200 and loved it, impressed most of my friends and learned to edit from tape to tape.

      6 years ago, I bought another TRV 33 sony, better resolution, more compact, better technology, but still the same single CCD image, although better than my first sony.

      now i moved up to a Panasonic AG-DVX100B, 3CCD with 24P , 60i and so on. So now i am overwhelmed with learning this new camera, new modes and shooting with controlling shutter speed, iris, white balance, etc….

      in the end you will find best results with the best equipment, nothing can make a consumer camera look like HD or pro’s that work for the networks, if so, we could all do it.

      so i encourage you to read, read, read, then buy something good, then read, read, read, shoot, shoot, shoot.

      don’t forget the editing, this is also a journey of educating yourself and trial and error with budget in mind.

      i landed with Adobe Premiere Pro 2.0 and all of their suites. If your a APPLE guy, Final Cut Pro etc…

      all the best on your journey,

      hope i helped

      Tin Man

    • #164473
      AvatarSpencerStewart
      Participant

      Many people associate the look of video with a harsh looking image. One technique that will make a small difference would be turning down the sharpening of your camera. I don’t know if that’s an option on your panasonic, but make sure its as little as possible. Some professionals even use diffusion filters to make the image look softer.

      Another look that separates digital video and film is the depth of field. The depth of field is the range of what’s acceptably in focus. For example, a narrow depth of field would only have objects within a foot in focus. Objects closer or further away would be out of focus.

      For video, most of us have a very wide depth of field. Film has a narrow depth of field and makes it look much more cinematic in many peoples opinion.

      Check out this video. It’s from a digital video camera, but with a 35mm depth of field adapter on it, making the depth of field very narrow and filmic:

      http://www.youtube.com/v/F93L6tmj76s

    • #164474
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      johnny Wrote:

      but when I look at the difference in a live tv broadcast on fox or cnn and then watch a documentary on PBS, the interviews don’t look like live video, like my cam, they look, well different, and I don’t know what that style or method is called.

      Do you mean that you want to shoot an interview with one camera and edit it so that it looks like it was a live news-program/late-night style interview?

    • #164475
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      "but when I look at the difference in a live tv broadcast on fox or cnn and then watch a documentary on PBS, the interviews don’t look like live video"

      part of the reason is they use cameras that cost $20000.00 and up, they have just absolutely great resolution. The only true way to come close to what you see on tv is to go HDV.

    • #164476
      Avatarsweeppicker
      Participant

      What you do with your lighting is just as important as what you do in post-production to acheive that film look. A telltale sign of video is it’s poor handling of overexposed subjects – e.i. washed out whites. If you light you subject carefully, you will be one step closer to obtaining a faux film look.

      It’s also important to shoot on a video camera that shoots 24P ( 24 frames of progressive).

      Once you’ve digitized your footage, check out Magic Bullet – a great piece of software that has a variety of film look presets.

      Hope this helps.

      Wedding Videography Tips

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