Help with picking out my first Camera

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    • #39526
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hi, I’m a new member and am in search for some help with finding a good camera. I’m looking for suggestions on your personal cameras and on the following that I am looking at. I am a teenager and I do have a limited budget, I’m looking for one that is preferably 2000 or less. I also need XLR and DV format. I will be using it for just about everything I want to do, shorts, trips, ext.

      Here are a few I’m looking at:
      Sony HVRA1U (The only problem with this one is its not 3CCD)
      Canon XHA1
      Panasonic AG-DVC3

      Thanks!

    • #170765
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Alexis,
      It would help if you explained what you wanted to do with a camcorder. 2 of the models you mentioned are hi-def, the A1U selling for about $2150, the XH-A1 selling for about $3250 (after rebate). You also mentioned a Panasonic DVC3… haven’t heard of that, but maybe you meant the DVC30 selling for about $1850? The DVC30 is standard-def and does not come with XLR connectors, although you can get an XLR adapter for it. Any of these camcorders would be a good choice… depending on what you intend to do.

      So….. is this for event videography, documentaries, nature, dramas, special effects, educational, commercials? Also, do you need hi-def capabiity (which would also require more computer resources for editing; and some way to distribute hi-def, like a BlueRay burner).

      Not trying to be nosey, but different applications require different camcorder capabiities. So, clue us in to your plans. πŸ™‚

      Ken Hull

      P.S. — Are you sure you need XLR?

    • #170766
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I will be using it for recording shorts and independent films to enter some film contests to build up a resume for college. Documentary films might also be a possibility.
      I obliviously cant afford a $3000 camera, so if you have a suggestion of one of these cameras or another one I didn’t mention that would be great.

      Also I did mean the DVC30.

      Thanks for your help!

    • #170767
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      OK then, let’s rule out hi-def for now. The 2 cameras within your budget that have some professional features you might want are the Canon GL-2 and the Panasonic AG-DVC30 (I’ve been very happy with my DVC30). Neither has XLR connectors, but companies like Beachtek, Sign Video, and Studio 1 Productions all make XLR adapters that should work with either camcorder. Also, Panasonic makes an XLR adapter specifically for the DVC30.

      The GL-2 has a larger zoom ratio, nice for sports and nature. The DVC30 has a bigger LCD monitor, and an infrared shooting feature for shooting in complete darkness. Other than that, they’re about equal. I think there’s a rebate going right now for some Canon models, like the GL-2.

      I’ll also mention 2 other models, the Panasonic DVC7 and DVC20. These 2 aren’t quite as pro as the 1st 2 models I mentioned, but they are shoulder-mount designs, which is nice if you’re doing a lot of hand held work. (Also, they cost less.)

      And of course, don’t forget you’ll need to save money to buy a good tripod ($75~500), a shotgun mic ($100~400) good editing software($100~600), and some lighting equipment($100~300). BTW, I’ve been using a Rode Videomic ($150), and am very happy with it. It uses a standard miniplug, not XLR, so it plugs right in to any of the above-mentioned camcorders.

      Hope this helps you plan your purchases, πŸ™‚
      Ken Hull

    • #170768
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Also I think that I’m not going to get the hi def camera unless it has standard format and its a good price. I was just throwing down some that I was looking at. Also I was reading a book to help me with this and it said that XLR was important and that alot of external microphones use XLR input.

    • #170769
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Yes, the truely professional mics will have XLR connectors. But since there’s so much equipment to buy, the total bill can be quite staggering. The XLR requirement is a place where you can cut corners…. unless you’ll be shooting in a location that is electrically noisey. A mic cable with XLR connectors is almost certainly going to be "balanced", which means it’s designed to cancel noise from electromagnetic fields. Fluorescent lights sometimes cause such noise. Also, my AC-to-DC converter causes electrical noise that my mic picks up. So I always run on battery. That reminds me… you’ll probably want to pick up an extra camcorder battery, preferably of higher capacity that the one that comes with the camcorder.
      Good luck! πŸ™‚
      Ken Hull

    • #170770
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thank you so much! I’m sure you have an idea how frustrating this process can be.

      Have a great day!
      Alexis

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