Help deciding – Mini DV or HD

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    • #42972
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I need help deciding on a new camcorder, PLEASE. I had a Canon Elura 100 for 1 1/2 years but it started having tape issues (won’t release them and/or take them). Instead of shelling out the $$ to get it repaired I thought I would get a new one. Hubby wants me to get a HD as he thinks it would be easier for him to “simply” connect to the computer & watch. I was leaning toward the HD but am thinking now about sticking with the Mini DV as I have a few years worth of tapes I would like to eventually (hopefully sooner than later) transfer onto the computer & copy onto a disc. I understand that the compression is better w/Mini DV but from what I’ve read, copying is easier w/HD. I only use my camcorders for filming our sons at racing events. I don’t really want to do a whole lot of editing (quite possibly a little). I keep hearing HD is the way to go & it seems as if the MiniDV is becoming obsolete. Bottom line I want the best way to preserve my sons’ events (previously recorded & future).

      Also, I’ve never copied anyfootage onto aCD& am a little confused. What I would like to do is filman event (wrestling match) & copy it onto aDVD. Then I would like to addadditional footage consecutively until theDVDis filled up. Can this be done & on which DV would I copy it to?

      By the way, the camcorders I’m currently considering are the Sony Handycam DCR-SR45 (HD) & Sony DCR-HC62 (MiniDV).

      Any suggestions ASAP are appreciated.

    • #179988
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      the only drawback to hard drive camcorders is that the video file is already compressed. yes, it’s much faster to ingest the footage to your computer, but in most cases with NLE’s, the footage will be decompressed and recompressed before you burn it to a DVD thus losing some quality.

      John

    • #179989
      AvatarRob
      Participant

      Knowing that you are an average consumer, I would advise you go to with tape. Just because someone says HD is the way to go, doesn’t mean it’s the way to go for you. The videos are for you and your family only, so it doesn’t matter what the industry is doing.

      Another drawback to hard drive camcorders not mentioned above is that consumers don’t always take care of their stuff. Maybe your stuff won’t purposely be thrown against a wall, but it could get pushed around or dropped on the floor by accident. That kind of abuse is not good for a hard drive, and it could possibly case you to lose your footage.

      I’d stick with tape. It’s proven method that has been working fine for years.

      As for your DVD question, are you trying to burn a DVD that will play in a DVD player, or do you want to burn a disk that is simply holding your files that you can access for computer viewing?

    • #179990
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thank you for your quick responses. I believe I will stick with the tapes. I’m a creature of habit & my instincts keep telling me now is not the right time to get a HD.

      Rob, as far as copying them, I would like them on a disc I can access both on the computer & TV. Not sure if that would be a DVD +R or -R. Whichever one would allow me to add footage until the disc is filled up. Thank you for your advice.

    • #179991
      AvatarRob
      Participant

      You’ll want a DVD-R, DVD+R might not work on all DVD players.

      As for adding video do them, you’ll need a DVD authoring program.

    • #179992
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      i will disagree with rob a bit. I have used both -R and +R DVDs and they both work great. the difference maker is getting quailty media. Verbatim and Taiyo Yuden are probably the best or most reliable brands out there.

    • #179993
      AvatarRob
      Participant

      I thought +Rs didn’t work on older DVD players…

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