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    • #39863
      MattyJatz
      Participant

      Hey guys, new to the forum and proud to be a part!

      Im in a pretty hectic situation right now. Heres the deal. Ive always been very interested in video editing, and have had a desire for quite some tine now. Ive been doing small projects for customers on the side. I first started with Pinnacle, but ended up upgrading to Adobe Premiere which I enjoy a lot. Now my dilemma, I have a full-time job right now, full benefits, and have been with my job for about 7 years. I have an opportunity to start as a Production Assistant with a Production Studio about an hour away from my house. They work with MTV, VH1. Im a little nervous because the hours are from 09:00am-06:30pm Monday-Friday which means I would not be able to work at my job now. I know production is mainly freelance work, and this has got me a little nervous because I dont want to be working as a PA for a couple months until the project is finished and then be out a job. I could become an editor once I prove myself but that would probably be down the road. I really want to pursue this career and become a professional editor however, Im sort of scared on what decision I should make.

      Basically, I know what a lot of you are thinking, which is, if you want it, make it happen. I totally believe in that, and believe in myself to be strong and work hard and I will succeed. Like I said many times above, Im just a little nervous and can’t decide on the best choice. It is a foot in the door. Please put yourself in my shoes and give me some advice. Thank you all for your time in advance.

      Matt

    • #171938
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      The biggest question is: Can you afford to give up your current job?

      Personally, if you have a family that depends on your paycheck, I would be cautious. If you’re single and relatively debt-free, or if you are in a relationship, but can afford to potentially be out of work for a couple months after the project, then go for it.

      There’s a saying that the wise builder counts the cost of construction before building. Know how much you can afford to lose, and if that outweighs the risk, then don’t do it. Now, if it were me, I’d already be at their studio, but that’s just me πŸ™‚

    • #171939
      Microchip
      Participant

      Matt, I agree with On A Roll. And remember, if you can’t afford to give up your job right now, this isn’t the only opportunity in the world that would have come along. There’ll be others.

    • #171940
      MattyJatz
      Participant

      Thanks for the help guys.
      No I’m not married, I’m still young, 23. I do not have a degree in TV/Film but I would love to go to school to achieve one. What I’m thinking is that if I go to school, get possibly an A.S. Degree in TV/Film, create a decent demo reel, then come back with that on the plate and see if they can’t hire me right on as an editor. The Production Manager said to me that this is an excellent stepping stone, but a lot of people come in with enough experience to be a full-time editor. I might just wait and do that… ahhh so many decisions to make… πŸ˜•

    • #171941
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Why not do both? Take the job, and go to school in the evenings. Then, when you’ve got your degree, you’ll have both education AND experience. School is great, but the world of video is one of the few remaining realms where employers consider experience on an equal platform with education. I know editors for TV stations who’ve never stepped foot in a college. But if you do have that degree, and you can couple it with legitimate job experience, you’ll be in a great place.

    • #171942
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Take a one year evening program for Video, Sound and Motion Graphics at UC San Diego Extension Digital Arts Center. Get Certified in Final Cut Pro. dac.ucsd.edu

    • #171943
      composite1
      Member

      Yeah hoss it’s a tough choice.

      The production co’ gig sounds pretty good, but you’ve already got a steady gig that seems to be paying the bills which these days is uber importante! PA gigs are a good way to ‘get a foot in the door’ within the industry. Many of the people I work with regularly started as PA’s on my company projects. Questions you better be asking are; Will the PA gig last longer than my day gig? Will the PA gig cover my living expenses? What are the odds the Production Co. will pick me up as a ‘regular’ after this gig is over? I mention this because production companies are notorious for ‘flushing’ their pa’s once a project is done.

      As it was suggested by yourself and another poster, keep your day gig and go to school. Don’t bother with an AS because it’s designed for getting basic college level courses out of the way and you won’t get to the course work you need until you go to a four-year institution (I know for certain as there are many college professors in my immediate family.) Either get a 4-year degree in Communications (cheaper) or one in Film & TV (tres’ expensioso) or take option ‘B’ and get certifications from a trade school or training seminars like those offered by The Sony Training Institute. STI courses are very good and you can tailor them to your needs. The courses go from two to five days so you could plan your vacation days to attend seminars. Prices are reasonable and you may have to travel to another city to attend (still cheaper than college.)

      No matter what you do, you will have to augment your education/training with experience. Check with the production company and see if they have openings for part-time work and look for indy projects that have need for the skills you already possess. They probably won’t pay much (or at all) but, you’ll build your credit list. Lastly, you say you already possess some editing gear, so if you don’t already have one, pick up a no frills DV camera and start shooting and editing. There are metric tons worth of books on both subjects and becoming competent as a shooter will improve your skills as an editor.

      Don’t sweat it. If you are truly serious about doing this kind of work, take small manageble steps first and you’ll be running before you know it! Good luck!

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