HD-DVD…BLU RAY????

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    • #182766
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I’m just wondering if anybody else feels like this technology seems a little old fashion. The disc players are big, bulky, and too mechanical for this day and age. I’m not really complaining, but doesn’t it seem a little obvious that this technology could easily be replaced by some sort of "HD memory stick" or on demand programming from satellite and cable provideres….I suppose my main purpose of this topic is to raise the same old question many ask…."Am I wasting my money?"

      It seem like the current question is HD-DVD or Blu Ray? when it should be HD-DVD, Blu-Ray or something better?

    • #43575
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I envision the day when optical media dies (at least for commercial distribution for movies– optical media will always serve a purpose with data backup, etc.) that we’ll be downloading (probably overnight for most of us) HD movies via the Internet and/or doing quick downloads via memory cards at Automated Movie Machines (like ATMs). You’d pop in your memory medium (which ever you’re entertainment system, which by then will probably a Media Center), watch a few trailers, pick a title, choose your language and aspect ratio. Then, you can choose extra features such as bloopers, director’s comments, and the such for an extra charge per item. Slide you ATM card through, the transfer begins, a few seconds later you’ve got yourself a movie rental that expires within a certain amout of time and of course you can then later purchase for additional fee later. Somebody probably has this machine built somewhere.

      Mark

    • #182767
      Avatarbarood
      Participant

      I agree, the first HD-DVD was a big bulky machine, like a VCR from 70s. About your technology replacement argument – "HD stick" is already available today, just that marketing factors also play a role. For example, movie artwork on the coverpage does not get displayed nicely on a tiny stick! Also, everyone does not subscribe to satellite/cable and may be what I want to watch is not offered by them. Video on demand in HD resolution is still some time away from being a reality for technology- and industry- related reasons.

    • #182768
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I thought that was the question but Blu-Ray seems to be the one [or I should say current one] for now.
      Sony has a laptop for $1999 with a Blu-Ray burner.
      As the prices fall Blu-Ray will offer more than HD-DVD.

      The main reason many are HD shy is due to price.

      When digital cameras cost $3000.00 for 3mp everybody loved 35mm film. Yeah, film who????

      When the price is right people will jump ship.

      If nothing better [and cheaper] is around the corner, I say Blu-Ray.

    • #182769
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      hidef1080 Wrote:

      When digital cameras cost $3000.00 for 3mp everybody loved 35mm film. Yeah, film who????

      I’m a big fan of using the right tool for the right job. Film is the right tool for still prints and slides

      If nothing better [and cheaper] is around the corner, I say Blu-Ray.

      and Blu-ray seems to be the right tool for providing HD content in a disc form. HD-DVD looks like [read: is] overcompressed crap.

    • #182770
      AvatarKevinShaw
      Participant

      tonsofpcs Wrote:

      I’m a big fan of using the right tool for the right job. Film is the right tool for still prints and slides.

      Photographic film is becoming irrelevant unless you plan to make wall-sized prints: even National Geographic has reportedly converted to digital photography. Plus film developing is worse for the environment than shooting digitally, for what that’s worth.

      As far as HD delivery is concerned, HD-DVD is currently cheaper but Blu-ray offers more capacity and appears to be winning the format war. Delivery on something other than spinning discs would be nice but is still expensive and not what consumers are used to. If you can’t afford a Blu-ray burner or discs go with HD-DVD on red-laser DVDs for now, but don’t bet on HD-DVD surviving much longer.

    • #182771
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I think you are right Kevin.

      I know there is some technology out there that is smaller, less break/scratch prone and can bring us HD images.
      But that would take just about company, studio, software and hardware maker to revamp their businesses and when you factor in the cost of trying to secure those images from bootlegging High prices for the customer.

      Just like HDV is a split between cost and image quality I believe both HD-DVD and Blu-Ray are a trade off because disc drives are disc drives with different color lasers but we can still play our old standard DVD’s.
      Like VHS and Super VHS….

      I give it 10 years or less and Blu-Ray will be old news.

    • #182765
      AvatarKevinShaw
      Participant

      hidef1080 Wrote:

      I give it 10 years or less and Blu-Ray will be old news.

      It’s been predicted that HD-DVD and Blu-ray will be the last disc-based delivery solutions, but then what’s next? The internet isn’t very practical for HD movie downloads and people like to have something physical they can store, so what would that be? I could see distributing movies on inexpensive flash memory cards, but those are almost too small to be practical. Time will tell what comes after the HD disc formats, but I wouldn’t worry about that until they’ve become pervasive in another 3-5 years or so.

    • #182772
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I like that…..
      I like the idea of the flash type ATM rent or buy.
      As long as I can get all of the extras and I can download it again if said flash device fails and if it would mean the death of so-called format wars…
      I say let’s do it.

      I think I’m ready for the online thing too because this year I have purchased softwares online [TAX FREE I might add] and the thing I like about it is that I can burn the software to disc or just log in under my account a download them again if need be.
      Today if I break a DVD Too bad for me….
      It’s funny because last year if I did not have something material in hand, I just didn’t feel right but now
      I’m all for the e-world.

      I still believe that until movie studios come with something that they feel safe in keep bootleggers away we may still be stuck in disco land when we should be in the 21 century.

    • #182773
      AvatarEndeavor
      Participant

      I’m a big fan of using the right tool for the right job. Film is the right tool for still prints and slides

      I totally disagree. First of all, what’s the point of slides nowadays? Secondly, digital prints look way better than film prints do when done properly with good equipment. Your comment reminds me of those folks that insist that vinyl records are way better than CDs. Of course, the reason they thinks (thought) this was because they are sentimental and they remember listening to them on vinyl back in the day. The Beatles just don’t sound the same without all those scratches. But they do sound better.

    • #182774
      AvatarDSKinTexas
      Participant

      hidef1080 Wrote:

      I thought that was the question but Blu-Ray seems to be the one [or I should say current one] for now.
      Sony has a laptop for $1999 with a Blu-Ray burner.
      As the prices fall Blu-Ray will offer more than HD-DVD.

      The main reason many are HD shy is due to price.

      When digital cameras cost $3000.00 for 3mp everybody loved 35mm film. Yeah, film who????

      When the price is right people will jump ship.

      If nothing better [and cheaper] is around the corner, I say Blu-Ray.

      Let me just say that the BDA (Blue Disk Association) specifications for Blu-ray may severly hinder your ability to create a full featured (ie menu, slideshow, etc) blu-ray disk. They are so worried about piracy that they have decided that ANY BD-R/RE (those produced by for example wedding videographers) that use the full features (BDMV) will need an AACS encryption key to work. Can you guess what one of these cost? I saw one report of $1500 per production.
      They are not completely cutting out the individual videographer; you will still be able to record, but it will more than likely be with a very rudementary menu system or playlist. Nothing like current DVD.

    • #182775
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      hidef1080 Wrote:

      I like that…..
      I like the idea of the flash type ATM rent or buy.
      As long as I can get all of the extras and I can download it again if said flash device fails and if it would mean the death of so-called format wars…
      I say let’s do it.

      Sounds like the Famicom’s FDS…

      Endeavor Wrote:

      Your comment reminds me of those folks that insist that vinyl records are way better than CDs. Of course, the reason they thinks (thought) this was because they are sentimental and they remember listening to them on vinyl back in the day.

      I didn’t use film "back in the day", I’m young enough to have been exposed to both film and digital formats. Both have their uses. Yes, both can be used to simulate each other, but each one has its own uses that it is better for.

    • #182776
      AvatarKevinShaw
      Participant

      DSKinTexas Wrote:

      Let me just say that the BDA (Blue Disk Association) specifications for Blu-ray may severly hinder your ability to create a full featured (ie menu, slideshow, etc) blu-ray disk. They are so worried about piracy that they have decided that ANY BD-R/RE (those produced by for example wedding videographers) that use the full features (BDMV) will need an AACS encryption key to work. Can you guess what one of these cost? I saw one report of $1500 per production. They are not completely cutting out the individual videographer; you will still be able to record, but it will more than likely be with a very rudementary menu system or playlist. Nothing like current DVD.

      I don’t think it’s clear yet what the BDA plans to do, and it is currently possible to make a BDMV disc which will work on some Blu-ray players – but not all of them. If the BDA kills that ability they’ll have to come up with some other solution or there will be a backlash, so hopefully this will all get sorted out in the long run.

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