Hard Drive Config and Refurbished Vs. New

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    • #36799
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I hear a lot of talk about setting up a hard drive for your system files and then putting your video files on a second one. Most pc’s i’m looking at come with one hard drive. Is setting up a second hard drive as easy as going down to Circuit City and buying an internal hard drive?

      My second question is whether anyone has any advice to stay away from refurbished computers or if they are usually good buys.

    • #163458
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      The answer to your first question is "YES." If you have a newer PC and you have interface room available, getting and installing a new HD is pretty easy. You just need to make sure you get the right kind and that you follow the directions. Some stores like Best Buy can even install them too for a nominal fee. You should be able to do it yourself if you have any kind of working knowledge of computers. If nothing else I’m sure you have a friend somewhere that might be able to help too.

      The answer to your second question is… "there is no correct answer." It’s just like anything else when you buy used or repaired equipment. You could run the risk of something being wrong but then again you might get lucky in which case you got a GREAT deal. You just need to make sure that what you’re buying meets you expectations AND that there is some kind of warranty included.

      RAM

    • #163459
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      If your computer supports SATA hard drives, go for that. They are the newest technology. They are faster and they connect with a thinner cable. The thinner cable allows better airflow through the computer. The IDE hard drives are still good. These use the wide "ribbon" style connector cable. The hardest part is formatting, and even thats not hard.

      The new drive will have an installer disc. Physically install and connect the drive, start up your system, and use the format disc to format it. There are 2 types of formats, NTFS and FAT32. FAT32 has a 4Gig file size limit. If your doing video work, use NTFS. There is no limit with NTFS. (Actually there is but its in the Terabytes).

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