Guidelines for pre-production…Suggestions?

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    • #36731
      Avatarbmoney
      Participant

      Does anyone have a written plan (template) that they use for pre-production?
      I’m going to shoot some equestrian instructional videos and I need to provide the talent with some sort of written guidelines to help them prepare their content.

      I figure once I have their outline I can plan the shots and make more sense of what should go on tape.

      Obviously I’m a novice or I’d have this in the bag already. πŸ™‚

    • #163227
      AvatarEndeavor
      Participant

      Are you supposed to write a script or are they providing that? If they want to do it, you will want to get that from them first. If you are to do it, you will need to gather as much info about what is to go in it as possible.

    • #163228
      AvatarEndeavor
      Participant

      Are you supposed to write a script or are they providing that? If they want to do it, you will want to get that from them first. If you are to do it, you will need to gather as much info about what is to go in it as possible.

    • #163229
      Avatarbmoney
      Participant

      Well the main person says he’ll just need cue cards with bullet points. Is there really anything else to do? I figured once I got the cue cards from them that I could plan everything around that.

      I’m just a novice so I wanted to check to see if you pros had any formulas that you use.

    • #163230
      Avatarbmoney
      Participant

      Yea I guess you’re right. Ok I’ll do that. Thanks

    • #163231
      Avatarbmoney
      Participant

      Oh for sure. And this is not just a “for-hire” deal either. This is actually a partnership in which I’ll receive royalties from each video sold. So we’re definitey going to take our time.

      The instructor has about 40 years of experience training horses and he does teaching clinics in front of hundreds of people every weekend so that’s the reason I don’t think he needs a written script. He did suggest having a bullet point board so that he won’t spend to much time on one topic or jump ahead and that kind of thing.

      I may just have to roll with it on the first shoot to see how it will unfold and where the weaknesses will be.

    • #163232
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      The 5p’s of production go like this:

      Proper Planning Prevents Poor Productions.

      Which means. He’s the horse expert, you’re the Video Expert.
      Tell him you both need at least a script. Otherwise you’re shooting a documentary you hope you can turn into an Instructional Video.

      I help with training at my local public access station. It was suggested (from me, actually) that we do an instructional video of one of the subjects I teach. I recently sat down and started the script.

      Bullet points are a start. What you may have to do is sit down with him and have him go through the spiel while you tape or video the speech and then write the script from that. Think of ways you can break up the video into segments. Maybe one index card per segment. Then, on the back of the index card write down the shots needed for each segment.
      DON"T FORGET COVERAGE AND "B" ROLL SHOTS.

      I know it takes time and everyone is probably jumping at the bit, so to speak, to get started. But the planning before you shoot will really help you down the line.

      Good luck!

    • #163233
      Avatarbmoney
      Participant

      Thanks very much for that input. And I realized this very clearly this past weekend when I was shooting a "reality show" for my website.

      I did not do the prep as needed and the end result was 6 hours of footage that will take an enormous amount of time and effort to organize and force into a story line. I did a fairly good job of sequencing the shots and having the subjects explain what was happening and why (much like the Orange County Choppers show).

      Anyway, I’m very new (obviously) so what is "coverage" and "B shots"?

    • #163234
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      When you finish a segment, review the tape with the talent. If there was a mistake not caught during the shoot, you have a chance to reshoot that section. Trying to match wardrobe and weather conditions a week later is not fun. Also, during the review take notes on what B roll shots will be needed. Types of haulters and other equipment need to be shown as a B roll close up. For the consumer, make sure that the safety topics for the person and horse are included.(this is an important topic for inexperienced horse owners) Good audio is a must!

    • #163235
      Avatarbmoney
      Participant

      Good audio is definitely covered. What are B shots though?

    • #163236
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      B roll shots are for inserting into your main(A) video. These shots( in your case) will give the viewer a better look at, or understanding of a particular item or subject. For example; if the talent is showing how to tie a rope haulter, you will have a framed shot of him/her at full body with B shots of the close up detail of the rope and hands. This can be used as an insert during the initial instruction, or show the process twice. If you are doing a two camera shoot, it’s easier to do the detail shots at the same time.

    • #163237
      Avatarbmoney
      Participant

      Thank you. It’s funny, I intuitively know that I need these things but I didn’t know they had a name.

      I have a huge problem (off topic – sort of) however. I bought two Sony VX2100s because I knew I would need mulitple cameras but I have no budget left to hire a second operator. (idiot, I know)

      This project will be based on sales of videos instead of being a hired crew. Do you guys think I can find an operator that would work on sort of a "commission" basis? If so, where do I find (online) a place to announce the need for this? This site? Others?

      Sorry for so many dumb questions. Your help is so appreciated and helpful!!!

    • #163238
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Depending on where you are shooting you can either try and "lock down" one camera (I’d say the wide shot) while you’re doing the close up work or –
      realize that this is a professional production.
      Once you realize that, try and hire a production assistant that can also run camera. Try a local college or even a high school.

      Or, if you can’t hire someone – do the shoot with one camera.

      Nobody says you have to use all your equipment. Think of the second one as a back up if the first camera goes down.
      Yes, this will mean you will have to shoot somethings more than once.
      So, Plan the shots carefully. Note down the shots needed. Storyboard if you are so incline – if you want a good tip on this – use a digital camera and shoot pics of your talent while he is doing the presentation that you are taping for the script. Put the pics into a slideshow. That becomes your storyboard.

    • #163239
      Avatarbmoney
      Participant

      Um… I do realize this is a professional project. I don’t appreciate the sarcasm. I look to people on this forum for experience not condescending newbie crap. Every project I undertake I go into with one thing in mind – professionally shot and edited video.

      I wasn’t hired to do this gig. So that should tell you that I didn’t put out and advertisement saying that I’m something that I’m not. I came up with this project idea on my own and I’m starting from scratch. Hence the reason I’m asking to see if someone has shot a similar project. Sheesh.

      Nevermind I’ll figure it out on my own.

    • #163240
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hey, I’m sorry if I came off being sarcastic.

      What you’re trying to do is very difficult, especially if you’re the only one with the video experience. You want the final product to be as professional as possible, and you have a small budget. I’ve been in your shoes more than once – still am – I’m in the middle of shooting a show that the producer wants to sell to television – and what started out as a decent size production team has dwindled very quickly, mainly because of the same issure you have – doing the project on spec, hoping to make money on the back end.

      Again, I’m sorry if my advice came off negative. I wish you and your project the best.

    • #163241
      Avatarbmoney
      Participant

      Ok cool. I appreciate the clarification and response. And honestly I may have been a little too jumpy there. I’m pretty stressed out about this project.

      I’m a babe in the woods on this one and it sucks. I have aquired an apprentice but he’s 15. LOL Yet he seems to be very focused and eager to work hard so I hope that he will be the filliment to the missing link I have at the moment. The best part is, he clear that this is all spec work and that he’s in it to learn, not earn.

      One other positive thing about this project is that my sister is the operations manager for this horse ranch. She is working on the project with me as the AD and has been invaluable thus far by putting together the shot sheets and even scripting. So at least my first venture into the unknown is not with strangers looking to me for EVERY answer.

      Her boss (the person the video is mostly about) is easy going and patient so that will also help. He’s also written a book that almost all of the shoots will be based on so, that has been a tremendous help as well for the scripting aspect.

      Thanks for the feedback. I’m more comfortable just knowning that others have been in this situation before and that it CAN be done. I guess the rest is up to me. πŸ™‚

      Peace

    • #163242
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      DONT DO CUE CARDS!!! That is the goofyest thing ever, then you got him looking at the cards not ware yu want him. learn the material or find a telopromter. (propter thing was a joke)

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