Frame Shake

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    • #36623
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hullo there everyone.

      There’s a cool effect I’ve seen in films that I’d like to emulate I’ve heard called “frame shake.”

      In Requiem for a Dream, it occurs when Harry and Tyrone are in prison. In Fight Club, it occurs when Tyler directly addresses the screen.

      Basically, the screen sort-of vibrates or shakes extremely rapidly. It’s an extremely intense effect, and I’d love to emulate it. I use Vegas 4.0.

      Any takers?

    • #162822
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      It sorta works in Vegas, but it’s somewhat tedious and the final effect isn’t as wonderful as I was hoping it would be.

      Would anyone know of any preset in any other video editing program that does this?

    • #162823
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Digieffects Delerium, or some other package of theirs, has a plugin for AE and PP1.5 called “Quake”. It vibrates the video vertically and/or horizontally at various degrees based on user settings. That, combined with the previously stated keyable movements, should produce a reasonable emulation of the fightclub effect. However, the effect in the movie uses several layers of video (3 or 4). If you use AE you can add motion blur to the movement to give it a more “music video” look (if that’s what you’re going for).

      P.S.

      If you think keying the frames of an effect like this is tedious, try your hand at rotoscoping 12,000 frames of non-greened video.

    • #162824
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      If you think keying the frames of an effect like this is tedious, try your hand at rotoscoping 12,000 frames of non-greened video.

      Nah, I’m good.

      Thanks for the advice though!

    • #162825
      AvatarComitar
      Participant

      Try shaking it and speeding up parts at different rates. Never slow parts down, but speed them all up, just at different speeds. Coupled with a shake affect that might look interesting.

      And if you haven’t filmed yet, make sure you film with stabilization off.

    • #162826
      AvatarPhilontilt
      Participant

      If you watch the special features on the Requiem for a Dream dvd, the director, Darren Aronofsky shows how he did it.

      Phil
      http://www.altaregoproductions.com

    • #162828
      AvatarWalterGraff
      Participant

      Try it the old fashion way. Two boards with four springs connecting them together. Springs have enough tension to hod the boards separate. Drill a hole in the top board and mount your camera. Fasen the lower board to something. Want shake, you got it.

    • #162827
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Walter goes old skool… Nifty. Props to the ingenuity.

      I also just found a great post-way to do this in AE. The expression wiggle(3,5) or some variation of those numbers should let you bust out some controlled “smooth” shake without having to keyframe motion manually.

      Also, if you add two layers of independently wiggle/zooming footage keyed to multiply, then the orginal footage can remain steady while the effect takes place around the focal point.

      I know it’s personal preference, but if you plan to do these types of effects in post then you can try multiple variations without being limited by your footage.

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