For laptop editing; Second hardrive?

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    • #40208
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hello group,

      I am still editing on an old Pinnacle DV500 with Adobe Premiere, it has treated me well but it is about time to move on. It’s getting buggy!

      Anyways, I would like to edit on a laptop and I am leaning towards Sony Vegas Pro. I do have a question regarding video editing ona laptop. Hopefully someone can assist.

      It is said that a separate 2nd hard drive should be used for video capture/editing. The main drive holds your operating system/programs and the 2nd drive holds your video stuff. Now this is easy on a desktop, but how do you do this with a laptop? Can you add a 2nd internal hard drive to a laptop? Or do you capture toa external 2nd drive using usb/firewire? Would you capture directly to the external attached hard drive?

      Thanks for any advice.

      Eric in Windsor, Canada

    • #172858
      Avatarjerronsmith
      Participant

      >>Can you add a 2nd internal hard drive to a laptop? Or do you capture toa external 2nd drive using usb/firewire? Would you capture directly to the external attached hard drive?<<

      In general laptops can’t take secondary internal hdds. If you were to get a laptop with a large harddrive you could partition it to create a storage drive that is separate from your system drive.

      I just use an external firewire hdd for storage of my video resources. I would always suggest firewire and not USB for speed and the way it handles the communication between devices. Since my laptop only has a single firwire port, I capture to my local hdd and then transfer to my external hdd after the capture process is complete.

    • #172859
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks Jerron,

      A follow up question for you.

      During the editing stage, do you then move the video footage back to the local hdd?

      Also, is a 2nd external drive attached to the laptop via firewire as fast as a 2nd hdd inside of a desktop?

    • #172860
      AvatarNewBirthProductions
      Participant

      if you already haveAdobe Premiere, then why would you want to switch toSony Vegas Pro?

      the only editing suit that’s better then Adobe Premiere is advid, and that’s because of the hardware that goes with it. but your talking big $$$$. i would stay with Adobe. get a apple 17″ mac book pro 2.93 ghz with 8 gigs of ram with a 256 gig solid state drive. capture and edit on the SSD and store everything else on a external firewire 800 terra bite drive. That’s what I would do if i could print money like Pebo.

    • #172861
      Avatarjerronsmith
      Participant

      >>During the editing stage, do you then move the video footage back to the local hdd?<<

      No, the only reason I have to use the internal hard drive to capture at all is because my laptop only has the one firewire port so I can’t connect the camera and hdd at the same time. The problem was finding a laptop that has a firewire port though, I ended up going for a MAC laptop. Many of the available PC don’t come with them at all and many of the ones that do only come with the 4pin port instead of the 6pin type. The two extra pins are used ony to supply power so unless you have to run a bus powered device (like an unpowered hdd), it isn’t a problem.

      >>Also, is a 2nd external drive attached to the laptop via firewire as fast as a 2nd hdd inside of a desktop?<<

      No, an external drive isn’t as fast as an internal drive would be as far I as understand it. Unless you need a laptop for the portability (I use it for editing on location) I would always suggest a desktop for any real work.

    • #172862
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      anyhoo, Vegas will do you just fine, many Vegas users edit on laptops and edit just fine with files on the hard drive or on the external drive. This biggest hurdle is hard drive speed. A 5400 rpm drive will not have the same performance of a 7200 rpm drive. Just a note about externals, they usually come formatted as FAT32. You need to reformat the drive to NTFS to have video files larger than 4GB.

      John

    • #172863
      Avatarjerronsmith
      Participant

      >>the only editing suit that’s better then Adobe Premiere is advid, and that’s because of the hardware that goes with it. but your talking big $$$$. i would stay with Adobe.<<

      That’s debatable, many people on these forums and other places would tell you that Apple FCP is a better editing suite than Premiere is.

      Vegas is cheaper than Premiere and does have a dedicated user base. While I tend not to like the ways it does things I can admit that it has an appeal as a pretty straight forward, accessible piece of editing software.

    • #172864
      Avatarjerronsmith
      Participant

      @Johnboy

      >>You need to reformat the drive to NTFS to have video files larger than 4GB.<<

      I was wondering what type of events you shoot that individual video files come out to more than 4gb. I usually work with shorter format stuff myself that is usually broken up by shot and scene so I haven’t run into this when logging/capturing footage.

    • #172865
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      “if you already haveAdobe Premiere, then why would you want to switch toSony Vegas Pro?”

      I have Premiere 6.0. In the computer world, that is ancient. However, it has served me quite well. From the research I have done Vegas Pro seems tobe a good value and I am leaning towards it.

    • #172866
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Jerron, I usually capture full tapes at a time. I don’t use any kind of scene detection so that the tapes contents are in one spot. Of course, I shoot things that are shorter, thus thefile size is not as big.

      cdnclub09, Sony Vegas Pro is a very robust platform that will do more than you think it could. I would suggest that you get the “Pro 8” version. It includes DVD Architect to make your dvds with. I would also invest in some of the training DVDs available.

      John

    • #172867
      Avatarcomposite1
      Member

      cdnclub09,

      You aren’t kidding! We’ve still got two of those old rigs (first and second version) though one is in a parts bin and the other on an old win98 machine we use for training kids.

      Okay, first off most likely you’re still using premiere 5.+ which was compatible with the pinnacle card so that’s got to go. Here’s the skinny on Premeire vs. Vegas (we use both); Premiere Pro has come a looooong way since 5.0 and can now be actually called a professional tool. It has a great post support pipleline with adobe products which can help you go from shoot to finishing. Unfortunately, you cannot buy it separately anymore for it comes with the Adobe Production Premium CS4software bundle. Good news is, you get an excellent post pipeline (Photoshop, Illustrator, Premiere, Flash, Soundbooth, Encore) and some production tools like Ultra (greenscreen tool) and On-location (video monitoring software) which come in mighty handy during the shoot. Best of all, it’s cross-platform so you can play nice with all of your ‘macie’ friends.Bad news is; depending where you shop, you’re going to fork over $1500+. Vegas on the other hand has also come along way and can definitely be called a pro editing tool. Vegas has a good work interface (as in cut & paste style) powerful audio support built-in and it’s post-pipeline has some muscled up friends in the audio-post dept. like Soundforge and ACID. Those two programs alone rival Pro-Tools (which is saying something) at a fraction of the cost. The good news, Vegas 8 Pro will run you about $450 – $600 depending where you shop (keep an eye on the Sony site because they often have promotional discounts that range from $100 – $200 off.) Also, Vegas supports nearly all of Sony’s latest cameras (HDV, XDCAM, DVCAM, DV and AVCHD formats) and VTR’s. Bad news is; Vegas is PC only and after you purchase Soundforge & ACID it will run you around the same price as adobe’s bundle (not including promo discounts.) Both programs work well on a laptop and have low learning curves.

      Since you’re still using the Pinnacle setup, you are using a PC (since Adobe and mac weren’t speaking premeire during that version.) When using a PC laptop you will certainly have to acquire an external drive for your video files. Fortunately, drives are cheap and you have two options; buy a prefab external unit or build one yourself using an external drive housing kit. Whichever you decide upon, get a250 – 750GB drive so you’ll have some room to work with. Of course, more gigs means more cash. If you’re doing short projects in standard def DV, that’s a good range with space for graphic and effects renders too. If you’re looking to do HDV, 500 – 1000GB is the range you’re looking for because HD footage needs ‘elbow room’ and you’ll need space for your renders too. When you get your drive, format it for NTFS and that will eliminate any 2GB or 4GB limitations on file size. Note: if building your own external drive, it is essential you purchase an internal drive that is compatible with your external housing. It may sound stupid, but you don’t want a SATA drive with an ATA housing or vice versa (not going to work!) Another thing to consider is what connections does your external unit have? Personally I get ‘combo drives’ (USB, Firewire) so I can use either as available. Concerning laptop adapter issues: most pc laptops use the 4-pin (i-link) input. However, there are many fine firewire adapters that will allow you to use 6, 4 or multiple connections.

      Lastly, capture/download your footage and do your renders on the external drive (that’s what it’s for.) Save your project files on your laptop’s harddrive. Oh, and put all of your ‘preview files’ (audio and video)on the external too because they’ll clog up your OS drive quickly.

    • #172868
      Avatarjerronsmith
      Participant

      Two corrections to what Composite1 wrote.

      You can buy premiere Pro separately from the Production Premium bundle, when you do you get OnLocation (direct to hard drive recording) and Encore DVD (DVD and blu-ray authoring). I just normally wouldn’t suggest it as the added feature set of the bundle is very impressive. Nothing comes close to it as a total all in one production solution.

      Ultra is not a part of the current bundle which is CS4. It was however a part of the previous one CS3.

    • #172869
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks guys for all your helpful advice!

      Eric

    • #172870
      Avatarcomposite1
      Member

      I sit corrected on Premiere being purchased separately $299 (Upgrade from CS+) $799 full version. I mistakenly put Ultra in the CS4 bundle (you can only get it in CS3). What was the other incorrect info?

      Also, an addendum: Vegas also comes with DVD Architect and Sound Forge comes with CD Architect (for CD mastering). The production premium bundle is a more economically sound choice as any one program in the bundle costs nearly half or more than half of what you pay for the bundle. Graphics wise, the premium bundle is a colossus. Audio wise, Soundbooth is it’s weak spot. Vegas has much weaker graphic support (but DVD Architect does have some support for photoshop.) It’s graphic support comes from Boris (which I could never figure out) and Magic Bullet. Audio wise, we’re back to the colossus thing. If you can’t afford a pro-tools setup, ACID and Soundforge will have your back. Cinescore is similar to Soundbooth. Not designed for hardcore Audio post, but dang fine for quick and dirty musical scoring with a low learning curve. I just checked on the sony site and it doesn’t appear they sell their pro software in bundles any more.

      So here’s the bottom line; if you go with the premiere bundle, you’ll get a powerful editing and graphic/mographic design package with reasonable audio post support with On-location as a location/studio video monitoring support tool. If you go with Vegas, you’ll get a very versatile NLE/DVD authoring package with strong audio post support built in and the potential of stronger and more versatile audio post support from ACID, Soundforge and Cinescore if purchased separately. It all depends on if your workflow is more graphically based or if you’re heavier on the audio-post side. My outfit uses both suites because each fills in where the other lacks. Economically, that may not be your initial choice. Adobe Production Premium: $1700+ (after shipping), Vegas Suite (if all pro production software are purchased: $1200+ (after shipping). All pricing came directly from the software company sites. Good luck!

    • #172871
      Avatarjerronsmith
      Participant

      Composite,

      Sorry, you were correct ony one thing off.

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