Fee negotiation – what’s reasonable?

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    • #42880
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Please help! I’m an amateur wildlife videographer who’s never sold or licensed any video clips. I have excellent footage of gila monsters in the wild — an animal that is rarely sighted. I was recently approached by an established nonprofit education company that wants to use some of my footage in their material and is willing to pay a fee. But because they are nonprofit, they say their budget is limited. I have no idea what to ask for or what is reasonable. The videos are posted all over the web — YouTube, Blip.TV, Revver, etc. but can be accessed from http://www.judykennedy.com/gilamonsters.htm if you’d like to take a look. They’d probably want to use the uncompressed .avi tape footage of which I have hours, I don’t know. (It was shot with a Canon ZR200 digital camcorder.) I have not spoken with them yet (just received an email) and do not want to until I have a better feeling for what is customary in these kinds of negotiations. I hope someone can help me or refer me to a resource that can. Any advice is appreciated. Thanks!

    • #179551
      AvatarD0n
      Participant

      somebody’s offering you money for something you’re already giving away?take what they offer.

      everybody including the military is on a budget… part of negotiating is finding out what that budget may be….

      non-profit doesn’t mean they don’t have a budget, or a bank account…. just that they don’t pay taxes on thier “profits”.

      make sure the end use is ok with you… and clear. keep your copyrights. get credit line.

      prices do vary…. can’t say charge xxx$$$$ for your film.

    • #179552
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      somebody’s offering you money for something you’re already giving away? take what they offer. everybody including the military is on a budget… part of negotiating is finding out what that budget may be…. non-profit doesn’t mean they don’t have a budget, or a bank account…. just that they don’t pay taxes on thier “profits”. make sure the end use is ok with you… and clear. keep your copyrights. get credit line. prices do vary…. can’t say charge xxx$$$$ for your film.

      definitely be sure that you are able to get a bit of credit for the footage – you deserve it.

    • #179553
      BrianBrian
      Participant

      The market rate for stock footage:

      License fees range from $25 per second for cable TV programs up to $350 dollars per second for a worldwide TV commercial. Most non-broadcast applications license for $45 per second or less.

      Stock footage licensing fees are also determined by usage and distribution territory.

      Discounts apply to:

        • Multiple Cuts
        • One Time Usage
        • Local TV Markets
        • Educational / PSA
        • Multiple Year License
    • #179554
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks everyone. Info’s been very helpful. While I negotiated a heavily discounted flat fee, I’m getting good credit and visibility, a copy of the end product, ability to use their clips in my marketing, and most importantly, the opportunity to work with them in the future.

    • #179555
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks everyone. Info’s been very helpful. While I negotiated a heavily discounted flat fee, I’m getting good credit and visibility, a copy of the end product, ability to use their clips in my marketing, and most importantly, the opportunity to work with them in the future.

      Congrats; sounds like all worked out for the best!

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