Editing and Authoring in 24p

Viewing 13 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #44903
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I did my first edit using footage that was shot in 24P with Panasonic cameras. Normally I only edit in 60i. The final version is looking really glitchy and jumpy. What could be causing this?

    • #187452
      AvatarRyan3078
      Participant

      Were the project settings set for 24p? If not, then that would explain the jumpyness. Is the version that looks bad being played back from Adobe for from the final burned DVD version?

    • #187453
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I exported the file from Premiere 1.5 in an avi file that was set to 24P Advanced. Then I imported the file in Encore to make the DVD

    • #187454
      AvatarRyan3078
      Participant

      Hmm…do you know what your deinterlace settings were, if any?

      Anyone else know something? I’m not too much of an expert with 24P.

    • #187455
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I re-exported the movie making sure to de-interlace the footage and on a test sample that seems to have done the trick. That was a great idea, thanks. 😀

      Don

    • #187456
      AvatarRyan3078
      Participant

      No problem!

      If your camera records 30p or 24p, that means it scans the footage in progressively, instead of interlaced. You’ve gotta deinterlace in progressive, and deinterlace upper or lower field for any footage not captured in progressive form

      glad I could help.

    • #187457
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Ryan3078 Wrote:

      No problem!

      … You’ve gotta deinterlace in progressive, and deinterlace upper or lower field for any footage not captured in progressive form…

      No, you most certainly do not want to Deinterlace your progressive video. Part of the value in shooting progressive is the sharper picture. When you add a Deinterlace filter, you throw away half of your picture, and half your resolution. Deinterlacing is a must 60i video shown online.

      itsdonny, 24p video is not as smooth as the 60i we’re used to. Can you post a sample of your video?

      -andrew @ videomaker

    • #187458
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hey Andrew,

      I will post some samples in a few hours. The way it was without deinterlacing was really bad. Do you have another suggestion I can try?

      Thanks,

      Don

    • #187459
      AvatarRyan3078
      Participant

      No, you most certainly do not want to Deinterlace your progressive video.

      In Premiere, there is an option when exporting video. Deinterlace. It has an option for upper or lower field, which of course would be for anything shot in 30i or 60i. But there’s also a progressive option. If you don’t want to deinterlace, than why would Adobe include that option?

    • #187460
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I’m not a pro at this but you need a program like Canopus Procoder. I’m not sure in which direction but it does a process called 3:2 pulldown. Video is 30 fps whereas film is 24 fps. There is 6 missing frames. The 3:2 pulldown creates 6 frames by interlacing the 4th and 5th frames to create the "intermediate" frames.

      Film Frames: 1 2 3 4 (4/5) 5 6 7 8 (8/9) 9 10 11 12 (12/13) 13 14 15 16 (16/17) 17 18 19 20 (21/22) 21 22 23 24 (24/1)

      There are 24 film frames and 6 interlaced frames to create 30 frames.

      My apologies if this is not called 3:2 pulldown but this is the process needed. Perhaps someone with a bit more expertise on this can provide better details.

    • #187461
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Ryan3078 Wrote:

      No, you most certainly do not want to Deinterlace your progressive video.

      In Premiere, there is an option when exporting video. Deinterlace. It has an option for upper or lower field, which of course would be for anything shot in 30i or 60i. But there’s also a progressive option. If you don’t want to deinterlace, than why would Adobe include that option?

      Ryan,

      Thanks for pointing that out, you make a good point. I’ll make some calls.

      I believe the feature is targeted at those making projects from still photos and animation.

      I’ve made a host of videos using still photos, and many tend to flicker on a TV screen because of their large size and resolution. And they’re progressive. I’ll apply a "flicker filter" or deinterlace filter to smooth them out. Yes, in this case it helps especially with pan-and-scan effects.

      We’ll have to check out itsonny’s footage…

      -a

    • #187462
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      So I managed to get the video to play right using Ryan’s suggestions to deinterlace. Anyway as far as using stills in Premiere, from my experience I can tell you that you should reduce the resolution to something closer to the footage you’re working with. I usually make my photos 1000 px wide so that I can zoom in and out a little if I want. Then there is no flickering. Full res photos cause a ton of flickering and selecting the anti-flicker button does nothing.

      Don

    • #187463
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      itsdonny Wrote:

      Full res photos cause a ton of flickering and selecting the anti-flicker button does nothing.

      Don

      Don,

      Yes resizing photos is really key. Great that you brought that up. Some deinterlacers/flicker filters work better than others. At least among FCP, PP2, and Vegas, they all are slightly different.

      -a

    • #187464
      Avatarmtrapp
      Participant

      When you bring a clip into premeir, how do you tell if its interlaced or progressive?

Viewing 13 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Best Products

homicide-bootstrap