DVD printers… suggestions?

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    • #40922
      Avataralohrey
      Participant

      I am looking into printers for printing custom labels onto DVD’s. I am leaning toward one of the epson’s either R200, R220, R320, R340 Are there any other options out there around the same price range or more? Also which one of the epson’s would you recommend? I don’t need large quantities, so volume isn’t too important, just looking for opinions and options.

      Thanks
      ~Adam

    • #174584
      AvatarEndeavor
      Participant

      I’m glad you brought this up. I need to get one of these soon (before the spring bridal shows). Are there any other brands I should look at?

    • #174585
      AvatarVideoman
      Participant

      I use Canon Pixma ip3000

      It has inbuilt tray and the drivers allow you to change ink density

      I use both White and Silver printable lables

      Coupled with creativity they are truly professional to boot

    • #174586
      AvatarBillM
      Participant

      I’m using an Epson R800 for both photo printing and CD printing. This printer is more expensive, however it use archival inks.

      BillM

    • #174587
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I had been thinking about getting an R200 for months. This thread was the last straw. I found one at NewEgg.com for $87 and a $20 rebate. After the rebate, the printer will come to my door for a bit more than $70.

    • #174588
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      If you’re interested in burning and printing at the same time, the Bravo II I have works wel.. I just start it up and the robot does the work.

    • #174589
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hey MissKIT,

      Your business must already be making money. I need to score a few more big jobs before I can lay down that kind of money. But I bet it sure is nice. I hve been happy with me R200, but fast? It ain’t.

      Tbone

    • #174590
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Tbone- Lots of discussion about the R-200 on the A-M forum.

      alohrey- The Epson R-200 has been a workhorse for me. I estimate around 1000 DVDs have been printed so far. When the time comes to retire it, I’ll get one of the higher end Epsons. The professional Epsons have a wider print tray that the DVD/CD goes into. This is more stable and has a geared track for positioning.

    • #174591
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Yes, I am happy with the performance of the R200. I do have a job on the horizon that will require 300 discs. I would like them all to have the classy look of a printed face. The R200 could surely print that many, but the time required for me to sit here and load 300 discs one at a time? Yeesh!

      If I have enough time between production and deadline, maybe I could send them to MissKIT.

    • #174592
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Kind of related: do you print directly on printable DVDs with the R200? Would you discourage using sticky labels?

    • #174593
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      The R-200 will print labels on paper like other printers, but I don’t do that anymore. If the disc isn’t stored under ideal conditions, the paper labels could separate- not good! The R-200 has a special tray that the DVD/CD goes into. You have to use DVD/CDs that have printable surfaces that are white.

    • #174594
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      That has been the information I have received as well. Printing on sticky labels to be applied to DVD’s is not recommended for two main reasons.

      One reason is that the DVD drives get hotter than the CD drives and can cause the adhesive on the back of the stick-on labels to fail while the disc is in the dirve. That can make for some messy difficulties in your drive as you can imagine.

      The other reason is that a stick-on label that is stuck on a little bit off center can cause excessive drive wear and even read errors. The DVD drives spin at a higher RPM than the CD drives. The off-center label makes the disc off balance, thus the wobble. Think of an automobile tire badly out of balance and how it hops as the car goes down the highway. Get the picture?

    • #174595
      AvatarVideoman
      Participant

      Don’t forget, the adhesive used on some lables can actually “eat” into the recording layer of the DVD/CD rendering it useless.

      There is virtually nothing protecting the burning surface of a DVD/CD.
      That’s whay you don’t write on them with a ball point pen or any old permenant marker or use adhesive labels.

      Most manufacturers have a warning label against “Stick-on lables”

      If in doubt read the box – you’ll see it.

    • #174596
      AvatarEndeavor
      Participant

      I have an r220 I’ve been using and it does really well. As far as time consuming, it is. But I usually just have my discs burning and printing while I sit doing something else and just stick in a new disc when one is done. Works pretty well and I can do several hundred in a few days in between other stuff. (still a pain but it works). BTW the r220 replaced the r200.

    • #174597
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Here’s an alternative: http://www.discmakers.com/duplicators/products/cdr105.asp

    • #174598
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I use the sticky labels, but perhaps I shouldn’t! Another question: Do you usually put your finished DVD’s in small jewel cases or do you buy the larger cases (like the size that movies come in)?

      Where can you get a good price on printable DVD’s?

      Thanks!
      Brad

    • #174599
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I use either clear clamshells or boxes that will hold 4 DVDs. See the above link to Discmakers. They also have blank DVDs. I never use stick on labels since getting the Epson printer.
      The clear clamshell cases have a snap closure around the hub. These are flexible and not only survive mailing without the case breaking, but help keep the scratches on the disc reduced. I once got a DVD in the mail that the slim hard plastic case had been broken. It scratched the heck out of the DVD!

    • #174600
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Our R220 is great for our needs. If I had to say something negative, I’m not impressed with the clarity of the images it prints on the disc, but for the price, the clarity is actually better than I anticipated.

      After we burn through our remaining slim jewel cases, we’re going to the clamshell cases too.

      Did I read a previous post correctly? Will the R220 not print the silver discs? No matter, just need to know before I make more coasters.

    • #174601
      Avataralohrey
      Participant

      hey, I got the R220 thanks guys and gals for all of the input it’s very valuable for these types of things. So far all is great, the discs look very nice. The best part is the $50 rebate I got for buying it at the same time as my wife’s new Rebel XT. Make sure to check into any available rebates from epson, there are some good ones.

      Thanks
      Later
      ~Adam

    • #174602
      Avataralohrey
      Participant

      I know I pay a little extra, but I always go with verbatim discs. I have had problems with just about every other brand, but verbatim has never given me issues. My suggestion is pick one that works well with your equipment and stick with it! I used to always go for what’s on sale, etc. Not a good practice when it comes to dvd’s.

      Later
      ~Adam

    • #174603
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I use a Primera Signature Z1 thermal printer. Since I do mostly weddings I have no real use for printing full color labels and even if I did, I’d never print with an inkjet printer. I print black text/logos on shiny reflective Verbatim DVD-Rs and it works GREAT – looks VERY professional. Also, it’s a very low cost solution! The printer ran for about $140. The thermal cartridges go for about only $20 too and you can get between 200-300 prints!

      Also, NEVER use adhesive labels! They work ok with CDs, but NOT DVDs. The discs get too hott and the adhesive melts, causing the label to wrinkle and get caught in the player (and look crappy lol). Also, it can cause read errors BIG TIME. Adhesive labels are a NO NO! πŸ™‚

    • #174604
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Also, since I’ve been printing with inkjet printers on white-printable DVD surfaces for several years now (since the introduction of the Epson 200) and not had one single problem or complaint, I’m anxious to hear what is so terrible about inkjet printers. Sure, I probably spend $100 compared to your $20 to print a few hundred DVDs, but my clients deserve the best.

      I’ll give you a few reasons why I don’t like inkjet and what I find terrible about them. For one, you’re not getting NEAR the quality you would with laser or thermal. And to get even close, you have to use the maximum quality settings, using more and more ink. Another reason, the ink comes off MUCH easier than thermal and it’s not waterproof. Also, yes the cost is an issue. To get decent quality from inkjet, you’re using a fair amount of ink. You’re spending much more on the prints. These are reasons enough for ME to not justify going with an inkjet printer.

      Now for the DVD covers however, I do print full color covers using a large scale color laser printer.

      This is simply the way I do things. It may not be what you do or the way you think, but your way isn’t THE ONLY way of doing things and there’s no need to attack others who don’t agree with your method.

      And I agree that clients deserve the best.

    • #174605
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Oh yes I forgot. You mentioned that I have a preference for text over photos. I never said this. I said that if I WAS going to do photos, I would use a color thermal printer, but due to the cost of the printers, I find the solution I’m using now to be more than adequete. Maybe I’ll investe in a color thermal printer in the future

    • #174606
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      There are times I’d like to print text on a silver disc and save the time of doing a full color work-up when it’s not required. Seminar discs are a good example. As a matter of fact, right now I’m working on the color artwork for a 4 disc set of a county multi-agency fact finding seminar. I could save about an hour just doing text! I think the Epson R-200 produces fantastic color and detail. You can tweak the print quality to your liking.

    • #174608
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      May I suggest the TEAC P-11. http://www.emedialive.com/Articles/ReadArticle.aspx?ArticleID=10792

      Regards,

    • #174607
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I was going to experiment with my R-200 to see what it will print like on a plain disc- silver finish vs white. Might have to adjust the printer settings for ink density.

    • #174609
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      At first you would think that multiple colors would look good. Unfortunately, what I have found is; on the white background (printable blanks) it just looks semi-cheezy, non professional.

      The silver blanks look MUCH better.

      I’m not sure if your printer would work with the shiny silver blanks or not.

      Take a look at some DVDs or CDs you currently own.

      I would experiment with the inkjet based unit, but I still like the thermal 1 color process myself.

      Again, this works for ME, on a small scale.

      My company decided we needed 5000 DVDs created, so I out-souced the "Replication" to a real pro with 4 color disk printing.

      Hope I could help.

      M

    • #174610
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I work more in a corporate invironment. To me, the monochrome are more professional, UNLESS they are done silkscreen, as were the run of 5000 replicated DVDs I just out-sourced.

      Wedding Video is a world of it’s own. That world scares me! 😯

      M

    • #174611
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hi, I have a couple questions. I have the Epson R320, it does a great job printing.

      My question is: what software do you use to design the DVD face and the DVD cover? The software that came with the printer doesn’t have much to choose from.

      I want to start using pictures from the video on my DVD covers, but what kind of software is there to design these. Thanks!

      Brad

    • #174612
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Hank, you have been so much help to me!

      So, do you design all your DVD’s and the cases using pictures from your video? What do you use for letters, fonts, etc. And how do you design your case covers (meaning how do you get the size right, using a template).

      Thanks again,
      Brad

    • #174613
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      The software that comes with the Epson isn’t bad. I import video and digital camera stills all the time. Stills and fonts can be sized and placed by dragging. Sometimes I’ll draw a rectangle and fill with a custom color, then put titles into that area. You can draw lines, size them, change their color, etc.
      I also have DVDShop- a custom PC made by Applied Magic( http://www.applied-magic.com ) that is fully automated for capture, burn, and all artwork. Heck of a machine!

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