Dance Recital Video Production

Viewing 3 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #46791
      AvatarEarlC
      Member

      Dance recitals. Youve heard of this market, maybe even tried one, and come away disappointed in the outcome. Perhaps yours, or the clients, expectations were not met.

      Check out http://www.eccomeecgo.blogspot.com and read “Dance Recital Video Production Simplicity, Economy of Effort, Affordability and Expectations are key to successful marketing of this income resource.

      You CAN put too much into such productions, thinking the majority of your potential clients will pay more to get more, or pay less and expect more. A simple approach to shooting and marketing will make you money and leave you with enough mental and physical energy to enjoy the other things in life you pursue.

    • #192652
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Good blog Earl. Simplicity is the key unless the production is going mainstream there’s no need to put forth so much effort for a dozen or so who want a copy of the recital. One thing that I can attest to is how quickly the money needs to be collected. Like an oldman who reaches orgasim the desire to shell out money for a copy dissipates fast. The night of the recital I could charge twice as much but just a day or two after people begin to wonder if they really want a copy or not. At least that’s been my experience

    • #192653
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I did a dance recital. The school placed a table outside the auditorium and had someone take orders for DVDs before, at the break, and at the end of the performance. It was a very lucrative job. I filmed two nights of performances. Editing took about 2 weeks (putting in titles, chapter markers, creating DVD menus, and burning DVDs). But after a few weeks, I never got any more requests for the DVDs.

    • #192654
      AvatarEarlC
      Member

      Leading into the performance with advance sales, selling at the event and a couple weeks between the event, delivery of a final product and initial order cutoff is pretty much, as you’ve experienced, all you are going to get. But, that figure could be high, or good enough, depending. (actually I NEVER have a cut off date and have over the years received numerous orders for previous productions due to loss, damage, belated relative requests, etc.)

      A typical two-hour, or less, performance for us takes about 3.5 hours in acquisition, less than 6 hours editing, less than 3 hours setting up the DVD & chapters, less than 2.5 hours for duplication and packaging – 15 hours or so. Production shouldn’t take much longer than that, on average.

      Yes many dance recitals can hit the 3-hour mark, or in your case and some of mine, there are multiple shows with different dancers/dances on different days. We have produced a weekend recital gig with a Friday evening performance, three performances on Saturday, a Sunday matinee and Sunday evening performance. Whew. It is a different ball of wax and the logistics of such productions can be overwhelming, depending on the school/client expectations regarding production value, cost of services and total numbers of sales (including the inevitable “My daughter/son is in four performances, can I get a deal?”) Flexibility is key in both working with these people, some really serious primadonnas are to be found in pretty much any performance event, and in developing pricing that works without feeling like you were totally screwed.

      Never promise more than you know you can deliver, or ask for more than you think your client studio is reasonably willing to invest – in time, cooperation, effort or money.

      Orders will “fall off” a couple weeks after the event – some due to bootlegging between friends, but mostly due to the fact that other events, family activities and life in general begin shifting your production video to the bottom of the “gotta have it” pile. Much of event video production sales success is in the “impulse aisle” or “emotion of the moment” category and that diminishes rapidly with time.

      I try to not EVER deliver ANYTHING until either the minimum sales has been met, or before that magical two-weeks after the event period, knowing that early delivery of copies will tempt the bootleggers. Keeping within this timeframe will usually generate the highest potential level of solid sales.

Viewing 3 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Best Products

homicide-bootstrap