Creating Video Documentary

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    • #37668
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I am creating a short 5-10 minute video documentary of struttinbucks outdoors. It is a hunting show based out of Arkansas. I am doing this for a project for school. I need advice on how to approach making this video.

      Any help would be greatly appreciated

  • #166964
    AvatarRob
    Participant

    The first and most important step is to plan your video. Failure to properly plan your video will result in a baaad video.

    So, how do you plan your video? Well, you have to understand that a video must have a point in order for it to be effective. Your viewer has to walk away understanding what the video is about. While some videos may be boring (like the training video I watched for my first job in high school), we rarely walk away from videos thinking, “Huh? What was that about?”

    Once you have made a decision about your video’s objective, it’s now important to understand that proper storytelling/videomaking requires that your script has a beginning, middle, and end. In other words, an introduction, the main information, and a conclusion. It’s a lot like a book. Books have an intro, narrative hook, rising action, climax, and resolution.

    So decide how you are going to introduce your video. I think this is the most important part. While your project is for school and students probably are forced to watch, if this were for TV viewers would change the channel if they didn’t know what they were about to watch. So, are you going to be boring and open with a line saying, “Hi, today I’m going to teach you how to hunt bucks.” or will you be creative and maybe open with a montage? The sky is the limit, but it is very important that you establish what your video will be about.

    Next, decide how you will present your content in a way that makes your point. I dunno exactly what your idea is, so I dunno what else to tell ya.

    Finally, wrap up your video. You could be bring and close with a line saying, “and that is how you hunt a buck,” or you could recap everything, or you could reinforce the point like Jerry Springer does at the end of every show. Again, the possibilities are endless.

    I’m gonna stop there. Your question, “How do you approach making a video” is such a vague question. Books are written about this. I’m not trying to blow you off…just suggesting that you plan your video first and them come back with more questions.

  • #166965
    Avatarcomposite1
    Member

    Bowman,

    Rob’s right. You’re question is mad vague. Only because you don’t fully understand the scope of what you are asking. I’ve consulted with others in your state who wanted to do the very same thing. Some had some really workable ideas and some were just smokin’ dope.

    First off, watch other hunting shows and see how the pro’s do it. Make notes of what you liked and didn’t then incorporate those things with your own ideas when you plan that video as Rob suggested (it’s called pre-production by the way.) The hunting shows you watch will have been planned down to the last detail and so should yours.

    You’re planning a full on production and there’s much to be done before you point a camera at anything. I gotta’ ask, have you ever shot video before?

  • #166966
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Alright thanks for your responses and sorry about the vague question, I’ll try and elaborate on it.

    I am creating a short video for school over the tv show StruttinBucks outdoors. The project was to take an essay that I had written earlier in the year and express it in a new form of art. I have a very small basic background in video-editing so I thought that creating a short 10-15 minute clip would be fun and allow me to learn more about my video-editing software. I am using adobe cs4 by the way.

    My thought on how to accomplish this so far is to start the video with a bunch of short clips with different parts of successful hunts and create almost like the opening scenes to a show. Then havea graphic design fly into the screen with the StruttinBucks Outdoors logo.

    My essay was about the history of how StruttinBucks was started so I was thinking of having interviews with maybe 3 or 4 of the guys on StruttinBucks outdoors then cutting the interviews up to key points that help progress the story while interjecting more clips of hunts in between. I am not sure how I would want to end the story, maybe with a discussion of the future of struttinbucks outdoors.

    here is a link to their website if anyone is curious,http://struttinbucks.com/wordpress/

    If this is still to vague then just let me know thanks for your responses they are very helpful

  • #166967
    Avatarcomposite1
    Member

    Bowman,

    Again I say watch the show you’re wanting to copy and other hunting shows to see how they flow and how shots work from topic to topic. Then, keep it short. 5 minutes should be your goal. Your ideals sound fine but 10 to 15 minutes is a big piece of time to cover properly and keep an audience’s interest. 5 minutes will get you in and out with a minimum of ‘hair pulling’ and spare your audience the ‘home movie effect’.

  • #166968
    AvatarXTR-91
    Participant

    If you have the right software capabilities, you could add a set of graphics(even 3D graphics) elements to your video along with sped-up shots of successful kills, possibly even made by experienced, or have somewhat of a skill ofshooting itthe first time, hunters. Fast rock music would also add to the drama. Something like what I mentioned above would make a great first impression… but like Rob and Composite said, shortening the length is also a good strategy. You should also have a pre-determined format for your video. Will it be in commercial form or short TV episode? Maybe a five-minute tutorial similar to that of which Videomaker has created a bunch of? A commercial form probably shouldn’t be any longer than 5 minutes. If it’s a TV ‘mini-sode’, you could probably get away with something at about 15 minutes or less. You should also be mindful of rules which the contest might have about this.

  • #166969
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    thanks alot guys for the responses its been very helpful.

    Any more creative ideas would be great, thanks again

  • #166970
    AvatarGrinner Hester
    Participant

    Most outdoors show’s stories are told in post. I’ve made countless outdoor shows and never has so much as an outline been written, much less have any kind of script. I simply waded through what was shot, made it make sense and offer some entertainment, then cut it to time.

    You’ll do the same. Shoot much more than what ya need then put it all together… stitching what ya need to together with VOs or praphics, if those elements were not shot in the field. This is the most producing that goes into an outdoors show. When ya get good at that, you cna have the host lay those down in the field, already knowing where the piece is going.

  • #166971
    Avatarcomposite1
    Member

    Grinner,

    Granted you may have made programs without an outline, but the kid said he’s basing his project off of his essay. If he makes an outline of the points he’s made in what he’s written, it will give him a clear path to what he wants to say ‘in post’.

    He’s a highschool kid without the benefit of the deep experiences you had. Learning to properly plan his projects by writing stuff down in a clear manner is a valuable skill he needs to learn before he can wing it.

  • #166972
    AvatarXTR-91
    Participant

    A post-narration would be a great way to go. Maybe someaudio affects, gun shots, scoping sounds (zooming). You could use yourself, or a separate narrator, getting recorded via video interview, and add overlay, such as graphics and hunting action that replaces parts certain parts of the interview (with the narration sound still audible).

  • #166973
    AvatarGrinner Hester
    Participant

    Composite1, my point is many projects, outdoor documentary being one of em, cannot be “properly planned”. They need to be shot then you have to see what ya have. You can plan on the Nooge nabbin 3 bucks with his bowday one but that hardly does the show any good when it doesn’t happen. It’s not I ever wrote Bill Dance fallin’ into the water. lol Life happens while people are writin’ scripts. If setting out to capture it… it’s best to be rolling when it happens.

  • #166974
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks for the responses guys been away from internet for a while and haven’t been able to respond.

    I want to clarify some things about the project.

    My essay was written about the history of the show StruttinBucks outdoors. I know the producer of the show personally and interviewed him to get my information. After writing the essay my professor told me that I had to do a “radical revision” of the essay in a different form of art. I have some basic editng skills and decided that creating a short documentary over the history of the show and how it came about then also include the future of the show.

    I plan on interviewing the producer tomorrow afternoon. Luckily I will have access to proper lighting and a good backdrop, probly will use a green screen, which will open up new possibilities in post productioin. I also hope to be able to interview some of the hunters that are on the show and get their viewpoints. I have access to 2 years worth of footage from the hunts of struttinbucks themselves so actually gathering footage of hunts is unneccessary.

    I really like your ideas XTR-91 and will probly apply them in the documentary thanks alot.

    Is there a way to have video look like the viewpoint through a scope in post-editing, then maybe have a bullet flying toward the screen and at the end hit the screen with the struttinbucks logo and cracked glass around it… I think that would make a cool endiing. I have the entire adobe production suite for editing.

    Thanks alot for the responses guys, they have been very helpful. Any more advice or ideas are appreciated.

  • #166975
    AvatarXTR-91
    Participant

    Professional hunters going through every step it really takes to get a good hunt in fast motion would be another great addition. The pro will then give a brief self-narration or visual proceadure for preparation and maybe later the part of turning the carcass into food. These are another set of ideas I’m giving.

    For more ideas, I’d get with a freelance pro/videographer. They may be able to lend more ideas and possibly more equipment for narration/composition.

  • #166976
    Avatarblindeye
    Participant

    I agree with grinner. We are doing a ghost hunting show, and we set out our path at the beginning of the night and follow that storyline, but I find the biggest challenge is to make sure I have enough B roll with reality footage. We can’t get the same lighting the next time around (or sometimes the same season!)

  • #166977
    AvatarXTR-91
    Participant

    “…but I find the biggest challenge is to make sure I have enough B roll with reality footage”

    Panning next to ghost smoke at night, sounds of bullets tearing through the wind, some “aiming scope” (e.g. getting viewed through a “future scope” that helps you calculate better), and even a number of odd kills, such as the carcass spinning, are some B-roll ideas.With right combination of story telling, good camera shots, music, and combination of video affects/b-roll, your final production will be good to go.

  • #166978
    AvatarGrinner Hester
    Participant

    Just shoot more than enough. Be it outdoors content or a paranormal show, tape is cheap and retakes are not an option. I literally shoot at a 10:1 ratio most of the time. This may increase my post time a bit but it ensures I have content to tell the story with.

  • #166979
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    thanks for all the comments and advice guys its been a great help

    The video turned out great. I had was able to make a 5 min video that got the point that I wanted across and still keep the viewer interested. I also was able to learn a little bit about adobe after affects and will most likely pursue work in that area because of how much I enjoyed it. Oh and http://www.freeplaymusic.com was also a great tool that I was able to use in the project and still keep it legal. I would post the video up here for your opinions but licensing agreements through freeplaymusic prevents me from this.

    Thanks again guys for all your help it was greatly appreciated.

  • #166980
    Avatarblindeye
    Participant

    We buy from Digital Juice. Worth the price not to have to worry about it.

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