Can I burn 1080p footage to a DVD? How?

Anonymous (not verified)

I am a beginner. Our video is only seven minutes long, so I don't think actually space on the disc is an issue. The footage was shot in 1080p, and edited with Sony Vegas Pro. Is there a way to keep it at this quality? We aren't sure which options we should choose when rendering in Sony Vegas--we think MPEG2. But we tried that and then we burned it (with Windows DVD Maker) and the video was squished horizontally. What are we missing?


Luis Maymi's picture
Last seen: 1 year 3 months ago
Joined: 09/26/2008 - 4:58am
Plus Member

DVD is 720x480. In order to burn 1080p you need a Blue Ray disc and a software with that feature. For the video format MPEG2 DVD works best.

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"The meaning of a movie are the characters, the life of the movie is the music, but the magic is in the editing" –  http://www.lomaymi.com


B Creative's picture
Last seen: 2 years 3 months ago
Joined: 08/13/2015 - 1:55am

can i burn an hd video (1080*1920) on a dvd and preserve a 1080 quality not 720 ?



Luis Maymi's picture
Last seen: 1 year 3 months ago
Joined: 09/26/2008 - 4:58am
Plus Member

Do you have DVD Architect Studio? This one is Sony professional version of DVD authoring (it also works with Blu Ray). I read about Windows DVD Maker and it said that it support over 60 video formats. My advise is to try different video formats until you find one that works best. I would start with uncompressed AVI or WMV, setting the features at the highest possible resolution and Variable Bit Rate 2 pass encoding. I recommend investing in DVD architect Studio because it will give you a lot more options and the interphase is almost identical to Vegas.

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"The meaning of a movie are the characters, the life of the movie is the music, but the magic is in the editing" –  http://www.lomaymi.com


Yvon Robert's picture
Last seen: 4 years 4 months ago
Joined: 10/17/2010 - 1:35am

Hi,

I am use Magix Edit Pro 17 Plus version I can burn the AVCHD Blu-Ray on a DVD the program offer this option.

To do so you must respect 2 conditions:

1) The maximum project length is 30 minutes or less.

2) Need a Blu-Ray burner on the computer and on your TV need a Blu-Ray player.

Main advantage is the cost of media $0.50 for a DVD compare $2.50 for a Blu-Ray and more easy to find special inkjet DVD to print direct on than Blu-Ray.

Main disadvantage is poeple try to play a Blu-Ray with a regular DVD player and this not work.

How to find a solution to this problem.

I continue to burn DVD top quality to a DVD disk because if you move to quality to 14 and bit rate very high on a TV like a 50 or 52 inches the quality is about 80% of a Blu-Ray naturally B-R offer more detail and crystal colors but pusking to the maximum the DVD quality can avoid B-R media costing too much for the moment and incompatibility.

Regards,

YR


artsmith's picture
Last seen: 2 months 2 weeks ago
Joined: 03/02/2011 - 9:06pm

From my experience, much of the advice, given above, is very sound. Good quality mpg2 is able to foot-it with many more hyped-up formats. However, setting the variables as high as you can, makes a lot of sense. I have burned my stuff for years on the second-highest 'quality' settings and with a maximum bit-rate of 9200, with footage of 720 x 576 (16:9 widescreen format). From my reading-up on such matters, that just squeaks in at the upper-end of DVD compatibility, if the lower bit-rate is allowed to 'float'. The settings it takes up might seem alarmingly lowat the bottom end-of-the-scale, but that is governed by contingencies and the nature of the footage being processed, the needs of more 'static' footage being much less, of course. After-all, most video formats only process the differences between frames (the 'B' and 'P' frames), while the scene is re-established, each 12 to 15 frames,by means of the 'I-frames'. So, my advice, (for what it is worth), see what the slowest processing option on-offer is, and give it a try. The assumption being, that the slowest and least convenient way of going about things, is usually the best in-the-end, with video.

For my own part, I produce my finished features in both high-quality 'avi' and 'mpg2'. The mpg2, for home consumption, the 'avi' (strictly speaking smart-rendered in the DV-AVI package), as a hedge against 'contingencies', for the future. As I think I may have mentioned on another thread recently, I have 96 DVD's of DV-AVI footage which I am editing my way through, some of my early footage, of historical events shot originally on 16mm film in the 4 x 3 aspect-ratio, have been cropped and re-stretched to 'widescreen'.

By the way 'Signmax', I use Magix 'Movie Edit Pro 17 Plus' for all of my work, currently; in preference even, to their own VSP-1.5, which I also have. A great piece of software at the price, which has me constantly wondering 'how-they-do-it'.

Ian Smith

Dunedin - New Zealand


Eventvideoguy's picture
Last seen: 4 years 10 months ago
Joined: 03/06/2009 - 8:12am

You can burn it to a regular DVD disc but not as a formatted DVD. You'll have to just burn the file to the disc. Sorry. DVD players will not read the disc.


Yvon Robert's picture
Last seen: 4 years 4 months ago
Joined: 10/17/2010 - 1:35am

Hi,

I mention that using a movie less than 30 minutes length you burn a Blu-Ray type on a DVD blank and you use a Blu-Ray player. Personnaly I not test if I create a Blu-Ray image less than 4,7 gig and copy this disk image to a DVD. My software can do it without problem.

May be somebody can test this.

Regards,

YR


D0n
D0n's picture
Last seen: 3 years 5 months ago
Joined: 11/09/2007 - 5:28pm

I've dropped discs and only do standard def dvd when specifically asked to do so.

I was the first hd shooter in my area, and as an early adopter, the first solution I found is still the best...

appletv or other such hd streaming device direct to tv from computer ( there are several options). 720 p is actually hard to tell from 1080 on large screens unless you got your face up to the display for pixel peeping, but for most people from a normal viewing distance, thier eyes cannot resolve the differences between them. Heck half the peiple out there cannot tell upsampled dvd from 1080p on a 40 inch flat panel from seven feet away.

I never went blue ray and do not regret it.