Buying a proffesional camcorder

Viewing 5 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #43080
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I am in the planning stages of beginning a wedding videography business, and my first concern equipment-wise is of course buying my cameras (up to $3,500/camera). I look online and do research and have a good idea of what I need and want, yet to come across any actual store locations where I may try these models out is almost impossibe. I am from Green Bay, WI and there is but one store here with only a few cameras available there. I really want to test before I buy, and explore my options, does anyone know how I can do this??

    • #180600
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I live in TN and have had the same problem in the past, my best advice is to read all the reviews you can, then make sure you buy with a return policy in case it isn’t what you expected. Then again, you could always just plan a trip to NY and visit the B&H showroom Ha Ha.

      I will warn though, that in this economy I’m getting fewer small weddings and a TON more bride-zillas. Take that for what it’s worth.

    • #180601
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Since you are in the planning stages, i’ll offer a few thoughts. Actually getting your hands on a camera could present challenges. I suggest that you thoroughly research different models that you are looking at. Try to find as many reviews and tests that you can find. Narrow your search once you determine which route you are going, whether its standard definition (SD) or high definition (HD). Then deal with reputable dealers, check resellersratings.com,Beware of the shops that offer that unbelievable price, because it is too good to be true, too many scam shops out there (I only deal with B&H Photo & Video). You camera choice will also affect your editing software choice. You’ll need some good wireless mics or digital audio recorders to acquire the best audio during the ceremonies. You’ll needgood tripods with good quality fluid heads and I would suggest a good monopod as well. The cameras will have to perform well in low light situations.

      Best of luck in your endeavors

      John

    • #180602
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Also, don’t forget to factor in accessories into your budget. Johnboy mentioned mics and that reminded me, A good fluid-head tripod per camera ($200 is usually a safe zone unless you buy 10Lb cameras) is a good idea. I like to use a dolly attachment like this one on one of my cameras. Audio is key for weddings because obviously what’s being said is the really important part. Batteries, on camera lighting, some outdoor light wrangling tools like reflectors and diffusers are good to have in the arsenal. And of course, all of the cases and bags to keep this stuff protected during transport. All these things add up and it’s something I overlooked when I first started out.

    • #180603
      AvatarEarlC
      Member

      Some advice regarding the startup costs for beginning your video services provider business, and a basic cost estimate regarding what it actually costs you to produce a wedding may be found at E.C. Come, E.C. Go my blog on video production concepts, ideas and marketing.

    • #180604
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Great reviews here, on Videomaker and more detailed ones on camcorederinfo.com

Viewing 5 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Best Products

homicide-bootstrap