BUILDING A NEW COMPUTER

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    • #39454
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I am looking for resources regarding building a new computer. I have done a fair amount of research, and have concluded that I want to stick with ASUS for a motherboard, and can’t decide if SLI is the way to go. I have many hundreds of hours of video to edit, and speed is critical to me. I have looked at the p5w DH (digital home) by Asus, and it is not SLI, but has 3 PCI which I like. I plan on 2-4 GB 800 mhz ram, twin 500 HD’s raid and I am getting stuck at the video card setup. Is it better to have two 256mb or is one 512 ok? I think I want the core two duo, the smallest chipset with 4mb cache. Any recommendations for card and motherboard combos that have worked for others out there? Am I going overkill wioth SLI? Thanks and be nice, its my first post here!

      bob

  • #170475
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    There are several posts on here regarding what to get for a setup…just do a search for them.

    As far as the video cards goes, I would suggest an ASUS NVIDIA GeForce 7950 GX2. It’s got 1GB on-board, but the price is around $600.

  • #170476
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Gandalf,

    Is this huge amount of video in high-def or normal? If normal-def, I would think 1 or 2 GB of system RAM would be plenty, and 256 MB on a PCI-E video card would work fine. Use 2 SATA hard drives, so you can keep your video files on a seperate drive from everything else. That way, when accessing a video file, you won’t be interrupted by the system accessing files that have nothing to do with your video activities.

    There are external hard drive systems available, which connect by USB. I’ve read that their access times are too slow for video work.

    My 3 cents worth. πŸ™‚
    Ken Hull

  • #170477
    Avatarbubski
    Participant

    once again your right comp. i have three hd’s i work with and it they do a great job in my studio (truck) two are external and the one in my laptop for the system, so now in saying that i wonder if having such a big video card does that really improve your disc you make or just makes your work look better as you edit cause i have done work at home on my desk top and on the lap top and it all looks the same when i play it (dvd) on my home tv. that’s my stupid qestion for the day

  • #170478
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    πŸ˜€ Some really good ideas from you all. I appreciate the time you took to respond as I plod through this. Is the typical capture method one of those boxes with analog and digital capture for $150-200 pretty adequate for what I am doing? I hear using the motherboard connectors for video can affect processor and computer operations more, or is that untrue?

    I am thinking motherboard wise either SLI with two 256 mb cards or normal with or one 512 mb. Seems like of you go sli you lose a PCI slot, since there are two video slots in mobo. But in a year, with sli, if you lose a video card, you have to replace it with an exact so they match. I have been looking at the Asus p5w DH Deluxe, but in manyu cases you have to flash the bios. Any recommendations for Core Two Duo mother boards? Reliability is more of a factor for me than screeching performance.

  • #170479
    Avatarvideoguys
    Participant

    The benefits of the graphic card depend on the NLE you are using. Some like Liquid will tap right into your GOPU for additional performance, others like Vegas do not utilize GPU at all.

    Please see our DIY-GPU article for an in depth look at what graphic card is best for what NLEs. http://www.videoguys.com/DIY-GPU.html

    Gary

  • #170480
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Gary,
    Thanks for your input, I have been to your site but missed that page. Lotsa good stuff. Any thoughts on using a card or an external analog digital firewire converter box.

  • #170481
    Avatarvideoguys
    Participant

    GANDALF4460 Wrote:

    Gary,
    Thanks for your input, I have been to your site but missed that page. Lotsa good stuff. Any thoughts on using a card or an external analog digital firewire converter box.

    external converters such as the Canopus ADVC110 are a great way to get analog video in and out of your computer. You will need a firewire port. Any software that supports DV editing via firewire will work with the advc110. Note: You will not get device control. IOt’s just straight capturing.

    Gary

  • #170482
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks again. I have some VHS, and thats great for analog. My Camcorder, Canon Elura 80 does not seem to work with USB capture, might it work with Firewire? The benefit of capturing direct digitally will a plus with the mini DV’s I am editing. Is the capture device just another obstacle for mini dv capture?

    I have looked at Asus motherboards, and not sure if I need SLI. Is the P5w DH Deluxe a good board to build this on? I am doing Video capture, some flight sims, photo editing and want to record live music (I am a musician).

    In finding an adequate power supply, is there a resource that helps to figuire what specific components use?

    Thanks again.

    Gandalf

  • #170483
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    You DO NOT need SLI for your setup. The only things you really need are decent (and lots) of hard drive space, a suffiecient amount of memory, a decent processor and firewire.

    SLI and ATI’s Crossfire and strictly for gaming operations. The benefit of having two cards in that setup is for the optical realism some of the latest games use. Using two cards can increase the fps the game uses at higher res to maximize your gaming experience.

    If you are planning on doing Analog captures NOT with your ELURA camcorder but perhaps some older 8mm or VHS tapes you want to transfer to DVD, you can always get one of ATI’s ALL-IN-WONDER video cards. These cards are great because they are you video card and they also allow you to watch TV and capture analog signal to your machine. It uses MPEG2 compression and has various quality settings for this.

    Hard drive space… typical one hour of MiniDV tape will use 13 gigs of hard drive space as a captured AVI file. you then need to encode this to MPEG2 (DVD compliant) in order to burn the videos to disc. There are many programs that will do this for you, such as Ulead Movie Studio and some other freeware ones.

    As for ASUS mobo, good choice! I would suggest the new e6600 intel processor for you, it is intel’s 2nd tier processor and (from reviews I have read) an excellent processor all around. Dual core is a little overrated at this point because there aren’t too many (if any) applications out there that make use of both cores at once. Their main advantages are that you could be encoding video and surfing the web or even playing a game at the same time without much processor lag. Get quality RAM (not budget stuff availabe at BestBuy!) like Corsair or Mushkin at the highest possible speed your mobo takes, and Dual Channel is another overstatement. Just get two identical sticks and it will work the same. Also, when doing analog captures, you need a separate sound card as using the onboard sound can sometimes cause the system to drop frames during capture. I used to know of a website that did calculations for Power Supplies, but cannot remember it. If you plan on doing any future upgrades to your system, make sure you get one with plenty of overhead! I found this out when I upgraded my processor and I ended up spending another $100 getting a new PSU. I personnally use ENERMAX 450W, I think they have 1000W available now!

    My system was top of the line 4 years ago, and can still hold it’s own against many lower end systems available today.

    ASUS A7N8X E deluxe
    AMD Athlon XP 3200+
    2×512 Kingston HyperX RAM
    2×200 Maxtor IDE Hard drives
    1×160 Maxtor SATA I Hard drive (my capture drive)
    ALL-In-WONDER 9800 pro AGP
    Creative Labs Audigy zs2

    The best website I can direct you to for loads of information is Videohelp.com, and for analog capture using AIW cards would be digitalfaq.com

    Good luck

  • #170484
    Avatarbubski
    Participant

    hi mr. comp. i wonder do you ever sleep ? 1st sqod. (stupid question of the day)

  • #170485
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Saggitarian,
    Thanks for your suggestions. The mobo I am thinking about is the P5w DH deluxe ($209 Newegg), and if I spend that kind of money, I want good ram. I ran into some posts on Newegg and other sites, indicating it will not recognize more than 3.5 mb since there are some resources embedded in the RAM. You must have to go to Vista to get the full 8 mb, but I think even three is enough, I am going to start out with two. The ram use is not conclusive, just a post. Another said that the bios setup was funky for clocking the ram, showed 800 mhz as 533 or something, and was not adjustable thru the bios. I guess I would have to get on the Mobo forum. Not really for this site. Others have succeded with it however. Curious. I agree that I do not need SLI or crossfire, but I like the features for video editing and it has a heck of an onboard sound system. If I need to add a sound card, no worries, it has three slots for PCI. Hard drive, I am thinking two 500 GB Seagates ES series. Use one for a backup. I don;t think I need raid. I was going to get the E6600 processor, since it is the cheapest with the 4mb cache. The P5 has the 975x chipset. Not the fastest, but probably fast enough. I purchased a 550 Antec, and an antec P180 Case. Might get a few more fans for the case for cooling. Should I go with one big 512 MB (lots of heat) in the PCI 16x. It has two other video slots (crossfire?) but I like to keep it simple.

    I thought of the Radeon, but the path of the data will likely be from the capture to the ram to the hard drive, the video card being for display. I appreciate your thoughts and experience, and four years from now I would like this system to be rocking on like yours is.

  • #170486
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Hank,
    Thanks for your experience, again. I am a bit confused, is firewire capture a good way to go? (yes-no)This Mobo has yellow red white jacks, but it seems that a separate device or firewire, or usb would give the best capture rate and not interefere as much with simutaneous operations. Just a guess on my part.

    Thats good advice, to capture an entire tape and clip. That was kind of what I had in mind. Of course I have multiple subject matters, and may make some clips into themes. I can’t wait till this tech part is over, but its fun learning about that part of it, as the technology ever rears its head at us. What causes the loss of quality in the edited MPEGS? There must be a forum thread on that. Never mind, I’ll look it up!
    gandalf

  • #170487
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    If it can only have 1 internal hard drive its due to the lack of physical space or mounting brackets. I built a computer last year for $1300 without ever having built one before. They really are NOT that hard. I’ve been told that Dell is going to Hell. They were great at first and once they captured the market they started cutting corners with their products. I know alot of people that had Dells break down. If you want to spend $1700 on a pre-made Dell, that same $1700 can build you a custom machine that blows it away. For $1300, here’s what I built (last year at this time)

    A Pentium D 2.8GHz dual core processor with a Zalman heat sink, 2Gig of DDR2 667 RAM, Intels 975 chipset, an ATI Radeon X1300 pro video card with 256MBs of video RAM, a 550w power supply, 5 Pioneer DVD+/-R burners, a 250G SATA boot drive, a 200G and a 160G IDE hard drives, and a tower to hold everything that has USB 2.0 and firewire ports. I use Adobe Premiere 6.5, Encore 1.5, Audition 2.0, CS2, Canopus Procoder 2.0, 3ds max 5, and Gear video 8 on XP pro w/SP2. It runs extremely quiet and fast. If Dell built this for me I’d spend $3000.

    An external hard drive can be fast enough through firewire and perhaps even USB 2.0. Partitioning 1 drive does nothing. Its like trying to play both sides of a vinyl record with the same needle at the same time.

    If you really don’t want to be bothered with building a pc, go for it (the Dell). But for the same money you could do alot better. Start with a chipset that will be fast enough for your needs, find a motherboard with that chipset that has the features your looking for (type of processor, pci-x slots, firewire, USB 2.0, SATA compatible, etc), then get your processor, RAM and video card to match your board. Add a hard drive, power supply, heat sink/fan, optical drive and tower and thats it. If you buy all the right parts, it will work every time.

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