Brighten super dark video

Viewing 12 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #46328
      Avataryuppicide
      Participant

      Awhile ago I was researching a camcorder to buy.. long story short I hate the camcorder. Even though it’s $350 I unloaded it for $50 because I was so mad with it’s poor quality in dark situations.

      Don’t you hate when you go to a concert and they have the lights on most of the way and you’re like “this is going to be great” but the second your friends band comes on the lights totally go off?

      So, I had recorded some super dark video of a friends band..

      Is there anything I can do to brighten it up a little? Any sort of easy plug in to use?

    • #191136
      Avatargldnears
      Member

      ” Don’t you hate when you go to a concert and they have the lights on most of the way and you’re like “this is going to be great” but the second your friends band comes on the lights totally go off? “

      Perhaps the other bands had a ” lighting director ” and your friend’s band did not?

      You can fiddle with brightness and contrast in your NLE, but all the video noise will be brought up with whatever images you have . . .

      Rick Crampton

    • #191137
      AvatarYvon
      Participant

      Hi,

      This not the camera you shot in total darkness, fans at 2 feet from the camera are black and the scene has no light You need spot light and remake with testing before the show.

      Regards,

      YR

    • #191138
      AvatarMediaFish
      Participant

      We use Adobe PPCS5.5. If you have this NLE i suggest you start with trying to set a white balance first by finding something in the video that I know is white or very close to it. Then I would work with the Levels control to ensure the blacks are black and whites are white and everything in between. After that I would attempt to set contrast and brightness after that I would go back to Levels and reset. I would use the color scope to try and get the colors centered. I would then use a g-blur to soften the noise and attempt using a noise reduction control possibly in AE. It will not be stellar but pretty sure it could be made to look better than what it is.

    • #191139
      AvatarD0n
      Participant

      I use a lot of still images in my video work, one of the things I try to do is to keep post production on my photos limited to effects that I can easily replicate in final cut on my video clips so I can easily match the videos to the stills… final cut has some layer modes and blend modes that work the same way as photoshop…

      I am just beginning to lear cs6 and premier so I can not give you specifics here, but there is a photo technique that maybe if you can figure out how to replicate it in your nle might help you out..
      here is a link to an article that has a simplified version of a photoshop technique I sometimes use to bring up shadow details for contrasty images for magazine reproduction…

      hope it helps you figure out a solution..
      http://www.macworld.com/article/1166185/a_fast_trick_to_salvage_an_underexposed_photo.html

    • #191140
      Avatarpalladini971
      Participant

      A lot of this has to do with exposure setting of the camcorder when taking this video. I have shot receptions at weddings where it so dark on the dance floor, clients comment me on the video quality of this afterwards. I have done nothing in the NLE, all is done with exposure in the camcorder.

      Can you adjust the exposure settings in the camcorder, read your Manual that came with that camcorder for directions on how to do this.

    • #191141
      Avatarbillmecca
      Participant

      Remember, everything we see is a reflection of light, no light=no reflection. your eyes have the human brain attached, it “knows” what should be there so it fills in the gaps, so it seems one can see better in the dark than is really true. the camcorder has no brain attached, it sees what it sees, no more, no less. In a band situation, the band is the focus, they kill the house lights and use stage lighting… if you want shots of the crowd you are going to need your own light, and be prepared for some dirty looks from dancers/concertgoers for blinding them.

    • #191142
      Avatarbillmecca
      Participant

      and if the band has no stagelighting, maybe there’s a reason. 😉

    • #191143
      Avatargldnears
      Member

      ” your eyes have the human brain attached, it “knows” what should be there so it fills in the gaps, so it seems one can see better in the dark than is really true “

      Human perception, visual and audio, has a far greater ” dynamic range ” than ANY electronic device . . .

      Rick Crampton

    • #191144
      Avatarartsmith
      Participant

      ‘Yuppicide’: It will not help in your case, I know, but it’s worth mentioning that shots which look under-exposed on your computer-screen, frequently look much better when shown on a flat-screen TV. I always, before I muck around with contrast/’gamma’ adjustments, etc. run off a copy of what I am doing onto a re-recordable disc, (it doesn’t even need audio), in whatever my final format is going to be, and see how it is shaping-up. Usually far fewer adjustments are required than might be apparent at first. I usually confine mine to contrast/brightness-levels and leave colour matching to ‘Magix’ at editing-time, which is quite well equipped for the task.

      Ian Smith – Dunedin, New Zealand

    • #191145
      Avatarartsmith
      Participant

      ‘Yuppicide’: It will not help in your case, I know, but it’s worth mentioning that shots which look under-exposed on your computer-screen, frequently look much better when shown on a flat-screen TV. I always, before I muck around with contrast/’gamma’ adjustments, etc. run off a copy of what I am doing onto a re-recordable disc, (it doesn’t even need audio), in whatever my final format is going to be, and see how it is shaping-up. Usually far fewer adjustments are required than might be apparent at first. I usually confine mine to contrast/brightness-levels and leave colour matching to ‘Magix’ at editing-time, which is quite well equipped for the task.

      Ian Smith – Dunedin, New Zealand

    • #278558

      I have a dark recorded video on my phone and I wish to view the content on it. Any help?

    • #278568
      Avatarpaulears
      Participant

      Most of the current crop of editing software applications can do this, but remember – if there is no detail in the shadows, you probably won't pull any detail back into the image. If there is detail but just masked, then maybe – a bit. Imagine that you have twenty different levels of brightness from white to black. If these are all unused bar the lowest 3 – then stretching that out will look pretty horrible. 

Viewing 12 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Best Products

A Tripod Buyer’s Guide for Every Budget

The best tripods for video — 2020

Carefully comparing and reviewing system specs will ultimately help you find the best tripod to fit your needs and your budget.
homicide-bootstrap