Beginner shooting a product installation video

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    • #47023
      Avatardantheman
      Participant

      I am new to videography and new to this forum.My experience is in making short videos of events for my church, using a simple Sony Handycam and Magix Movie Edit Pro 15. I’ve gained one client who saw one of my videos and wanted a video for his website. Another guy saw one of my videos and now wants me to produce an installation video for an automotive aftermarket product that is about to go nationwide. GULP! I definitely see this as a huge opportunity to liftoff my videography business and to build my portfolio. Obviously I can’t go in there with a little Handycam and some softboxes and not expect to get laughed out of the room…SO…need a little advice here.

      They are looking for a product installation video. Basically filming a man installing the product in a car, with a voice over, explaining the steps of the install.

      I just acquired Sony Vegas 6 and am learning how to use it. I am looking into the Canon GL2 to film it with a Bogen 305 tripod. I have a green screen if necessary as well as 3 Vu-Pro softboxes. Not knowing a thing about audio, I’m not sure how to record a voice-over.

      If anyone could offer some advice, I would greatfully appreciate it!

      Thanks in advance!

    • #193645
      AvatarBruceMol
      Participant

      If you can, get your talent to install 2 or three times so you you can get different angles. With the emphasis on the product, not the talent, you can add voice over later w/o worrying about moving lips etc. If you can’t to a ‘re-install’ i.e. holes have to be drilled or something that alters the environment, go slow at that point and get a few different angles before the cut or drill or paint – whatever. Get a script too, useful to guide you and your talent to a successful shoot. Break the shoot into scenes so you know what to get and then get some coverage for all those scenes. The most difficultly withthis type of shoot is when the owner/inventor wants to ad lib – they usually goon too long!

      It’s a great opportunity for you to direct a shoot. Unlike a wedding or birthday, even a vacation, you can yell CUT! As for narration,I really believes in voice talent, professionals are realy worth it. They get most scripts in two takes and that saves a lot of time and effort. By all means record on the set if that is the treatment you want to take, recording ‘installation noises’ is good too, they make for good A/V fade outs (where you pick up the action again after the glue dries etc.)

      Use titles to numerate the steps – pretend people are watching w/o the volume up – “This is a 3 step installation, Step 1 is to ..” Title step 2 and 3. Review quickly and remember you are working on a sales pitch so include titles for how tobuy the thing and how much.

    • #193646
      AvatarXTR-91
      Participant

      I’d go looking for some more knowledge (hone up on some more video skills) before you begin. Have you checked Videomaker’s entire realm of tutorials?

      http://www.videomaker.com/learn/

    • #193647
      Avatardantheman
      Participant

      Thank you for the feedback!

    • #193648
      Avatardantheman
      Participant

      I would like to add a professional voice-over to narrate the installation. How would I go about doing this (finding a professional and recording it..or do they record it for you?) Also, how much could I expect to pay?

    • #193649
      AvatarXTR-91
      Participant

      If money isn’t much of an object at this point, I’d go with hiring a voice talent professional (e.g. local radio announcer). I’m not quite sure what the rates are, but have heard a random figure from some place that they charge around $30 an hour. Otherwise, I’d self-narrarate (or ask for someone to volunteer) using a cardioid condenser microphone or shotgun mic via an interview.

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