Amateur at wedding video-please help!

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    • #36659
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Can anyone give me some suggestions as to how I should shoot the bride coming down the aisle? I’ve only done one wedding video, and it was for a relative (for free as practice). The only thing I overlooked was how everyone stands up when the bride enters and exits. How are you guys/gals shooting it? Any advice is greatly appreciated.

    • #162938
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Compusolver,

      Thanks for your resources and your concern. I really appreciate it.

      Any other information anyone???

    • #162939
      TheDVshowTheDVshow
      Participant

      You’re the person with the camcorder, you’re the one getting paid, you’re the one who wants a referral for the next wedding on what a great job you did….

      So stand with your camcorder right in front of the altar, on a tripod ready (not fully extended but balanced and centered) to fold up quickly and your camcorder zoomed in on her as she enters. Kneel down and support your camcorder if you have to.

      When she starts walking closer to you start zooming out SLOWLY keeping her within frame as she gets closer and closer…. keep one eye on the viewfinder and the other eye on her.

      Right when she reaches the 3rd pew start moving away- physically get out of there to the left or to the right so you can get her kiss her Dad and join hands with the groom. After you get this you have enough time to set up your next shot before the officiant starts talking. Leave the rest to editing.

      Now, you don’t have to be so “on the edge” just get her walking down that aisle- maybe move out of the way when she reached the 10th pew…

    • #162940
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Brian,

      Thanks for the helpful info!!! I also like the drawing. Helps me visualize it.

      Compusolver,

      Thanks for your caution. I wouldn’t have thought about that. That’s also a good suggestion about the demo videos.

      Also I forgot to mention, I will be using at least 2 cameras. My friend just bought an XL2 that I might be able to borrow also, so that would make it 3 cameras. Another thing: I will be the only one filming. The other two cameras will be unmanned.

      Any other suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Now all I have to do is get my hands on some wireless mics…

    • #162941
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks again for the advice. I agree, Lux rating is very important. My GL2 is rated at around 4-6 Lux however for some odd reason is does really well in low light…but the XL2 is not rated better than this. And I will be manning the XL2; it will not be unmanned.

      Btw, I checked out your demo and I like what I see. πŸ˜€

    • #162942
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I’ve done 2 weddings (by myself), for free for friends or relatives that were not going to get a videographer anyways, so in other words, low expectations. While there are a few obvious professionals already giving you teriffic advice, I have just a few recommendations, from a fellow amateur:

      1. The more cameras the better. I used 3, one of them set up inconspiculously behind the altar on a mini-tripod.

      2. Pay extra attendtion during the rehersal and put down tape strips on the floor to mark where the wedding party should be standing. This way you know how tight you can zoom in and not risk missing the couple in an unmanned shot.

      3. Wireless for sound (seems like you’ve got that already)

      4. After the ceremony, take advantage of the picture time that typically follows and get some extra shots. For example, get a ring exchange close up, get a walk-by of the wedding party standing up. Basically, any shot that you probably couldn’t get during the ceremony without being very intrusive.

      5. Reaction shots from relatives are great. Try to sneak up close to the right or the left to film the parents, or set up an unmanned camera that films the congregation. This is much easier with a handheld, though.

      Those are the little things that I can think of at the moment.

      Have fun!

    • #162943
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Rock,

      Good food from all of these guys. The thing I always preach to others is to shoot as much video as you can. Make sure you capture the important elements from as many angles as possible. The idea of using the photo session afterwards is an excellent one. You can get great additional intimate head shots here along with other various b-roll shots. You can even create poses that you can use. The more video you shoot the better off youll be when looking for that one special scene later in post.

      The magic really starts in your edit bay when you start putting it all together. Here is where you can make or break the entire project!

      RAM

    • #162944
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks for all your help, guys!

      Just an update: I shot the wedding, and everything went great! One thing I do on my premium wedding package is a 4 minute overview of the wedding set to music at the beginning of the video.

      Since I really respect you guys as professionals, I want your honest opinions about my overview.

      Check it out!

      http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=2937193296548769463&q=wedding+overview

      Thanks again!

    • #162945
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Rock,

      Not bad! The camera angles were very good. The only thing for me is that you might need to watch the titles. There needs to be a little more contrast difference so you can see them better. They kind of blended into the back ground. The other thing is that my eyes were actually watering on some of the blurr effect shots. You can use that but don’t hold it to long. Also… don’t be afraid to throw in some black and white in there. That is always a hit and I think it is a very neat effect.

      Now of course this in just my humble opnion. The couple will like it!

      RAM

    • #162946
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      RAM,

      Thanks for the tips! I’ll definately take that into consideration on my next project.

      Yes, the couple loved it! So much that they immediately bought 5 extra copies!

    • #162947
      AvatarEndeavor
      Participant

      Very nice! Just a couple editing suggestions to polish it up a bit for next time (btw excellent job not overusing transition effects): When you dissolve between shots try not to dissolve from one “zoom out” into another “zoom out”. It looks kind of off (there are times to use that but for the most part, try not to). Also, try to start the dissolve after the zoom move starts. It’s usually best IMO for zoom shots to start and continue the zoom through the entire clip (not that you cant have shots that start a zoom in the middle or vice versa but I usually try to avoid it). Good job using slo-mo. Works great on highlight vids! You have alot of talent! Keep it up!

    • #162948
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Endeavor,

      Thanks so much! I’ll be sure to remember that when editing zoom shots.

    • #162949
      AvatarEndeavor
      Participant

      No problem! It’s easy to tell when someone has a natural eye for this sort of thing and you definitely do! BTW sort of a side note, I have noticed that the higher end clients will pay more attention to your talent and the quality of your work rather than the number of years experience you have. The lower end of the market knows they can’t get the best quality so the best they can do is “How long have you been in the business”. There are alot of older more “experienced” videographers who have scores of jobs under their belt but every one of them lacks the professional talented aspect. But we both know that experience has less to do with the quality of the video than your natural talent. Also, when you get established, make sure you don’t charge less than you’re worth just because of lack of experience. I started out at the low end of the market and discovered that people were passing me up because they thought “cheap = crap”. Once I raised my prices to match the high end clients, they associated the price with quality and started calling! (That doesn’t mean charge more than your product demands. Look at the competition in your area and rate your quality against your competitors. Then price accordingly). Actually, I think I still may be priced low. I have competitors who charge more than me that couldn’t hold a footcandle to what I can do but at least I am in the high end bracket.

    • #162950
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks again, man!

      EDIT: I meant above, not below.

      I totally agree on everything you just said above. I think a lot of people tend to underprice themselves and get taken advantage of. I priced very very low on this job just because it was one of my first weddings. But now, that’s all about to change!

      I feel like I should have a website up or something. I’ll get moving on that.

    • #162951
      AvatarEndeavor
      Participant

      Yeah! If you get a website set up you can list it for free with a bunch of wedding sites that will give you free leads. There are alot that will charge you and some of them may be worth it but at least get started with free ones! And I totally agree that you may want to do some cheap or freeuntil you get enough behind you to show that you are good. Sounds like you are off to a good start!

    • #162952
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Will do!

      I’ll post again once my website is up.

    • #162953
      Avatarfaqvideo
      Participant

      May be too late, but worth checking anyway:

      http://www.faqvideo.com/bride-aisle.html

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