4:2:2 10 bit

Viewing 7 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #43097
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I attended a Final Cut Studio event today. One of the moderators said that an ideal broadcast quality camera in the market is one that shoots 4:2:2 10 bit. He did not mention any specific brand, but the Panasonic AG-HPX 300 came to mind.

      Unfortuanely, I’m not paying those ridiculous prices for P2 cards. Otherwise, I would have already bought that camera or something like the Sony EX3. Sony’s SxS cards are also very expensive. Then there’s the JVC 700U which records files native to FCP on inexpensive SD cards.

      All of this information has left me confused. How important are these spec/codec issues if you want high quality and hope to show your projects on TV or in a film festival? What are the minimum standards/specs a shooter needs?

    • #180663
      AvatarRob
      Participant

      P2 cards are not over priced. People never seem to realize that you buy the media once and use it over and over again. Over time it will be cheaper than tape. Also, you do not have to buy a tape deck, which costs a couple grand. When you add it all up, P2 is the more affordable and practical choice. A 64GB P2 E series card is only $1000 and Panasonic claims they will last 5 years of DAILY use.

      The 700U records files that use MPEG compression to the SD cards. Not cool for editing, although, you can convert to ProRes, but that doesn’t change the fact that you recorded very compressed video.

      If you are going to have your project on TV, you need to contact the network for specs. They don’t tell you that you need a 4:2:2 10-bit camera. It’s more along the lines of not having your audio too loud, not having your blacks too low or your highlights to bright, not having over saturated colors, duration of the piece, etc. That all needs to be taken care of in post no matter what camera you shoot with.

      As for a film festival, you’re going to be judged on your shooting/lighting techniques, audio quality, storytelling, and editing. Not by what your camera shoots.

    • #180664
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      Thank you for the helpful information.

      When you say that you can convert to ProRes do you mean that you should set your capture, i.e. Easy Setup, to ProRes?

      It’s actually funny to read what you posted because JVC makes a big deal out of their marketing that states that the 700U (and the 100U) are specifically made to enable native editing with Final Cut.

    • #180665
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      I also wanted to specifically add that the 700U shoots QuickTime .mov format. Therefore, I thought that no conversion was required. At least that’s what JVC says.

    • #180666
      AvatarRob
      Participant

      I’m not knocking the 700U. It’s a great camera. You just seemed like you were interested in high quality and the video recorded to the SD cards may be convenient, but not the best quality in my opinion.

      As for converting to ProRes, you will have to do it in Compressor after you capture or on the import for you feel like spending money for an AJA Kona 3 or LHi card, which only work in MacPros by the way

    • #180667
      AvatarNormanWillis
      Participant

      Better equipment definitely gives one an edge. But content is still king, and technique in shooting and post is still the queen and the princes.

    • #180668
      AvatarAnonymous
      Inactive

      You have both given me great information. I will have to rethink my bias/anger/boycott against expensive media. Perhaps I’ll will seriously reconsider my choices, especially my orginal first choice which is the Sony EX3 with its half-inch 3CCD. The HPX300 which is a close second. These two cameras are also supposed to be decent low-light performers. That’s an issue that’s important for me. I plan to shoot outdoors at night.

      I have been using the Panasonic DVX100B for some time now. It’s a nice camera. But I believe HD is now a must-have option in any camera. Perhaps I’m stating the obvious.

    • #180669
      AvatarRob
      Participant

      the EX3 does not have CCDs, it uses CMOS sensors. Same with the HPX300. If you do not research the difference between the two, you may be unhappy with the results. In a nutshell, CMOS sensors may records frames with partially over exposed horizontal bands when shooting near a photographer who is using a flash. and when panning fast you may get some skewing of vertical objects, like a pole for instance. I don’t have nothing against CMOS, you just have to understand them if you are going to use a CMOS camera.

      And you are right about HD. I’ve lost a job opportunity once already because I don’t have an HD cam yet.

Viewing 7 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Best Products

The best 360 cameras available — 2021

360-degree video is a brand new medium driven by new 360 camera technology. However, its immersive qualities create unique technological challenges.
homicide-bootstrap