Audio Sweetening

Audio Sweetening

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Complex phenomena, very w

artsmith's picture
Complex phenomena, very well explained. My experience, has been that audio has been very much the 'poor-relation' to video, for far too long. I spend, these days, as much, if not more time on my audio, as/than I do on the video content of what I make. It's also a great field to permit creativity, and so I am constantly adding to an archive of video sounds, such as the sea in all of its moods, etc. Some of the most elusive sounds, for example are self-defeating. In New Zealand we have a native flax, (phormium tenax), which has a very characteristic 'rustle' in wind, but recording the sound, in the winds we frequently have here, is, of course, defeated by wind-blast into microphones. That's when you get close to the ground, 'under' the wind, if possible, even if those looking-on, think you are nuts. Boots walking on all sorts of road-surfaces, through tarmac, gravel, to wading through waist-high grass; bird-calls, sheep bleating in fields, and so-on, all have a place in our landscape. Your's too, will have its own kit of sounds. When well-recorded, they add and essential 'ambience' to any production. I have, on occasion, mixed sound up to 12 to 16 tracks 'deep' in my video-editor, including some essential 'atmosphere' effects, (the landscape is seldom silent), made, where need be, from 'white-noise' from a signal generator and modified by some of the means described in this excellent article. If all else fails, a Digital Audio Workstation may be used to 'sub-contract' out some of the effort. Timely article. Ian Smith Dunedin, New Zealand