Video and Audio Tips are Appreciated

Thanks, Videomaker

I just wanted to drop you a note to say thanks. I believe that almost 85% of what I have learned about video has come out of your magazine. Thanks to your help, I will shortly be showing my first educational documentary on community access early this spring. The project has been over a year in the making. Most of it has been new ground for me. The thing that has helped me the most has been the idea of constructing a working dub for editing purposes. The wear and tear that this has saved on my equipment is tremendous. It also forces you into critiquing your work precisely. It is time consuming, but the more you put into it, the better it will turn out.

Bill Groh

The Internet


Review Readers’ Tapes?

I really enjoy your magazine, and you folks at Videomaker have excellent suggestions for improving the quality of (our) videos. Even the audio tips are right on target, even though audio is not your main focus. My videos have improved dramatically over time because of these tips. (Some tips have even come from your readers). I know you have contests and have listed users groups, but if you would review a few of your readers’ tapes every month, you would see common (and uncommon) mistakes made by videographers that might not otherwise be covered elsewhere in the magazine. You could limit the length of submission or whatever you want, but much can be learned from actual reviews of readers’ production attempts.

Sean Shannon

The Internet


Going Nonlinear

A big "thank you" for a great article goes to Don Collins "Tips & Tricks For The Digital Nonlinear Editor" in your December ’98 issue. I was blown away by the honesty and directness of the inset piece "Is Nonlinear Right For You?" on page 104. I wish I had read this a year ago, before I wasted a lot of money. I have found, however, that a short digital segment inserted in my wedding videos is much appreciated by my customers, and adds a lot of excitement when done right. It ALMOST makes up for my disappointment at the limitations of nonlinear. Keep up the good work at Videomaker, and thank you for not blindly chasing the advertising megadollars at the expense of your readers.

Kelly Boyd

The Internet


Film Transfer

I just started getting your magazine and it’s great. I just have one comment on Art Aiello’s January 1999 article, "Saving Family Classics: Film-to-Video Transfer." In the article, he makes the claim that transferring films to video is "the best way to preserve old movies before time corrupts the film." That statement will only perpetuate the misconception that video is a better archival medium than film. The last thing we need is to have more people tossing their old home movies after transferring them to VHS. I was recently given 12 reels of beautiful 16mm home movies from the early 1930s. I’d like to see VHS tapes hold up so well after 65 years. It is true that with today’s digital media, digital tapes or digital information could be cloned to the latest format every five years to preserve the images for a very long time. And it is true that certain types of color film are more prone to losing their color than other types. But the idea that any magnetic tapes will last longer than 8mm or Super8 or 16mm film is just plain silly. Otherwise, the article was very good as are all your other articles.

Jim Bihari

Columbus, OH


Thanks Again, Videomaker

The main purpose for this mail is to say thank you all for the many years of help your magazine has provided me. I will be 70 years old in April and have been freelancing for the local TV stations in Spokane, WA since 1991. Our archives show over 1,500 videos and stories that we have done since that time. (Last count was 1,996). Now, to try to stay ahead of everyone, I have upgraded our computer system and we are in the process of going digital all the way. If it wasn’t for your magazine, I don’t know where I would be. Once again, thanks to all.

Russ Greenfield

Post Falls, Idaho

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