For the Lone Wolf Producers

I really enjoyed the Doing it All article in the June ’09 Directing column. It is one of the most inspiring articles that I have read in Videomaker in a good while. Peter Biesterfeld writing is very on time especially when you consider all that is happening in the economy and in the industry, like Kata’s recently released One Man Band line of bags. Also, Biesterfeld’s emphasis on getting good audio is on target. I’d like to encourage Videomaker to produce on-going regular or occasional Lone Wolf Producers. And the best tools for the Lone Wolf who truly does everything – shoot, edit, location audio, post audio, 3D animation, 2D animation, compositing, image processing, scripting, distribution, etc. I hope that you will consider this request.

Marcus Warren

We agree, Marcus. We’re curious about the many Lone Wolf producers out there and recently started a column showcasing Producer Profiles. See this issue’s profile on page xx. We are also working on next year’s calendar where you’ll find more stories focused on the one man band videographers. Doing it all can be rewarding, if not a bit hectic, and we hope to learn more from our readers about how you Lone Wolves make it all happen.

-The Editors

More Editing Tricks

In regards to the article appearing in the In Box section of the March ’09 issue, the writer used usable audio and during the editing process slowed down the video to half speed (for only a few seconds) until the audio matched the video. This method resulted in a loss of lip synch for the first few seconds of a wedding speech.

There is another method besides slowing up the video to catch-up to the video. The writer, who advised he had a second camera at the wedding, could have taken video “cut-away” shots of the guests during the speech. Since there was only a loss of a few seconds of video, but none of the audio, the aforementioned cutaways could have covered most of the initial speech for a few seconds. Merely using an insert edit using the cutaway of the guest over the non lip-synch portion of the speech would be much easier as the audio would be under the inserts.

Lou Bruno, Video Lecturer

So true, so true, Lou. We are always advocating video producers to grab several good cutaway shots at any event they happen to be shooting. The cutaway is the classic “save your bacon” shot in editing!

-The Editors

Serif MoviePlus x3 Review

This is exciting! (Re: the Serif MoviePlus x3 review in the June 2009 issue). I have been considering the jump to HD video for over a year now. One of the drawbacks has been the multitude of reviewers (customers like me) who have had miserable experiences, either with the camcorder itself, or with the software/AVCHD interface. Now with MoviePlusX3, it looks like I can put the camcorder I finally bought to immediate use.

Since the vast majority of DVD players will not play AVCHD discs, one must reformat AVCHD to a compatible DVD system. This software would seem to do that. I have been using Premiere Elements 4 for some time and generally enjoy it, except for titles, which are cumbersome and slow. I have bought a new duo-core laptop with 4 gigs of RAM, and just today got the new CX100 from Sony. This software will finally fill the bill. Thanks for the positive, glowing review. Now I just need to find it!

Bill Lewis


Still Looking

Why are there no inexpensive, Mini DV record/playback decks out there? I know Sony has them, but they are rather expensive for the average consumer who would like to do some video editing without using his own video camera. With all the Mini DV cameras out there, you would think that someone would have brought out an inexpensive deck by now. Any suggestions?

Paul Boudreau

We agree, Paul. We’ve long lamented about this lack of necessary tool for users and have written about it a lot. We’re still waiting. When we hear of this magic product’s release, we’ll certainly send up the signal flag!
We have often suggested using an old or inexpensive camcorder for this purpose, but some NLE’s won’t “read” the footage shot from one camera that is being captured on another (and this is also a huge problem when it comes to HDV-if you have footage recorded on a Canon, for example, your Sony camcorder probably won’t be able to play it back.) This is another thorn in our sides that we’ve discussed. Whatever happened to the common formatting of the old S-VHS days, huh?

-The Editors

Thank You

I look forward to seeing my magazine arrive every month in my mailbox. Keep up the good work.

Yvonne English

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