Fast Agreement
Fast Electronics and Sanyo’s Industrial Video division have formed a
joint agreement to develop control products for Sanyo’s recording systems. The Edit-Pro is the first result of
this agreement. This is a complete package that includes Sanyo’s GVR-S955 editing recorder and a
computer-based timeline editor that offers over 200 digital effects. Further products are in the planning
stages.

Digital Video Camera
In Japan, Sony announced that they’ve signed an agreement with
Texas Instruments to develop digital video cameras specifically for use with computers. The cameras will
use a high-speed chipset developed by Texas Instruments to record video in digital form, eliminating the
need to convert analog video signals for DTV use.


Product Menu


Strata StudioPro 1.5 ($1495)
Strata Incorporated
St. George, Utah
(801) 628-5218

StudioPro 1.5, a 3-D application for the Power Macintosh, has gained some recognition for its Hollywood-
style effects, which now include explode, shatter, atomize, morph, warp, path extrude and Boolean
modeling. StudioPro has been used by many professional video and multimedia productions.

VideoPacker Plus ($375)
Vic Hi-Tech Corp.
El Segundo, California
(310) 643-5193

VideoPacker Plus is a full-motion video/audio capture, storage and playback hardware system that comes
complete with AVI and MCI drivers. The unit includes VGA color key and chroma key; bit map overlay;
contrast, brightness and saturation adjustments; and a full anti-flicker filter. The VideoPacker Plus comes
bundled with VideoStudio software for full-motion capture and editing.

Grand Vision Pro ($349)
Dobbs-Stanford Corp.

Dallas, Texas

(214) 350-4222

This multi-use scan converter works with Macs, PCs and most Powerbooks. The unit converts your computer’s output to flicker-free composite or S-video (in either NTSC or PAL). It also comes with a lavalier microphone and built-in pre-amplifier, which makes the Grand Vision Pro ideal for business and education presentations.

ProVtr ($99)
Pipeline Digital
Kaneohe, Hawaii
(808) 235-0335

ProVtr is a software and cable combination for the Macintosh that imports time code for use with
Adobe Premiere. It works with most pro VTRs that use 9-pin RS-422 protocols, and also supports most
internal time code readers (Sony BVU-800 compatible). A version called ProVtr/Autolog also includes tape
logging software for keeping track of shots on a volume of tape.


Nonlinear Editing Price Watch


Nonlinear systems make editing video as simple as cutting and pasting text with a word processor. With
nonlinear, editors enjoy true random access to scenes through an intuitive graphical user interface. Thanks to advances in compression technology and plummeting computer prices, nonlinear editing is ready to revolutionize video at all levels.

This table shows the cheapest current system capable of true VHS-quality nonlinear editing. We define
VHS quality as any 60 field-per-second, 320 x 480 pixel, full-screen display. Hard-drive prices reflect
storage for about 10 minutes of digitized video. Prices are valid at time of writing, and subject to
change.

Computer: Macintosh Power Mac 7100, AV card – $3349
Capture/display board: Supermac SpigotPower AV – $995
Software: VideoFusion Capture Utility – (bundled)
RAM: 8 MB upgrade – $330
Hard Drive: 1GB SCSI – $950
Total – $5624

Note: Supermac SpigotPower AV is also capable of 640×480 pixel capture/display at 60 fields per
second.


Screen Test

DQ-TimeCoder ($295)
Diaquest Incorporated
1440 San Pablo Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94702
(510) 526-7167

DQ-TimeCoder is a Macintosh-based plug-in product for use with the popular Adobe Premiere editing software package. It provides time code capability as well as source deck control directly from the Adobe interface screen.

The ability to use time code offers many advantages for Adobe Premiere users. If you’re using Premiere
version 3.0 then DQ-TimeCoder will allow you to log all the shots on a volume of tape and create batch
capture lists, functions not possible without time code and machine control.

DQ-TimeCoder will operate with almost any VCR having a 9-pin RS-422 serial port and an internal time
code reader. Typical prosumer/industrial examples are the Sony EVO 9800/9850 series Hi8 decks,
Panasonic’s AG 7650/7750 S-VHS decks, and JVC’s BRS 622/822 S-VHS decks.

Once the DQ-Timecoder is installed on your system, it makes a few changes in the way Adobe Premiere
operates. When you choose Movie Capture under the Premiere File menu, for example, you’ll notice the
window has changed appearance. Now, instead of just an image icon and a record button, you will also see a
row of machine transport controls along the bottom edge. There’s also a time code window and a window
that allows capture of in and out points for your scenes. A reel number indicator, auto record selector and
log in/out button complete the changes.

To record a movie with time code, simply find and click on the in and out points, check auto record, and
click on record. Or, if you have Premiere 3.0 and click on log in/out instead of record, a screen comes up
that allows you to capture a batch list (a group of scenes) for later editing.

You can calibrate your Premiere setup for use with DQ-TimeCoder through the record settings menu.
During testing, I found that the recommended settings located in the well-written manual worked fine.

This is a simple, easy to use and fair-priced little plug-in. If you’re looking for time code accuracy in
Adobe Premiere and appreciate the convenience of machine control from your Premiere screen, definitely
check out the DQ-TimeCoder.

V-Station 3300 for Windows ($995)

Future Video Products, Inc.

28 Argonaut, Suite 140

Aliso Viejo, CA 92656

(714) 770-4416

From the EC1000 to the Editlink systems, Future Video has long been a manufacturer of high quality edit controllers. Now, their Editlink systems have evolved into the V-Station series, which are available in Windows, Mac and Amiga versions.

The V-station series consists of three separate packages offering different levels of price, power and
performance. The V-Station 1000 is a cuts-only software and cable package. One step up is the V-Station
2200 cuts-only system which adds a plug-in controller card. Both of these systems offer one GPI
trigger.

The V-Station 3300 tested here is Future Video’s full-blown A/B roll system complete with serial to
LANC breakout box, software (with tutorial), all necessary cables and full documentation. Gone are the
graphics boards and titling software of earlier Editlink systems–in their place are three GPI triggers for
independent control of external special effects generators (SEGs), titlers and other equipment.

V-Station 3300 offers two ways to edit your videos. You can manually perform individual edits
one after the other, or you can create an Edit Decision List (EDL) with multiple events and have the V-
Station 3300 automatically assemble your finished tape from scratch. You can also print out the EDL for
later use.

The system will work with 5-pin Control-M (Panasonic), Control-L, or professional RS-422 editing
protocols. Future Video supplies the cables required at the time of purchase. The V-Station 3300 also
recognizes both SMPTE and RCTC time codes for more accurate editing. I tested the system using all Hi8
RCTC capable equipment and constantly got accuracy of +/- 3 frames (and sometimes +/- 1 frame). The
system requires any 386 or better CPU with a minimum of 4 megs of RAM and Windows 3.1 or higher.

All edit control is done through the single interface screen which provides separate transport controls for
all three tape units. Along the top of the interface are multiple pull-down menus for such tasks as system
configuration, full EDL editing, edit trimming and all other basic editing functions.

The EDL window dominates the center of the screen. To make your edit list, you simply use the transport
controls to search your tapes, then use the mouse to lift the proper time code numbers and drop them into
the EDL window.

A note of caution: the V-Station 3300 requires a special GPI cable (supplied by Future Video) when using
Videonics products with the GPI triggers. If you use Videonics equipment, be sure to use it, or you may
harm your gear!

I found this system rather easy to use, partially due to the well-written manual and extra documentation
included, but also because the interface lends itself to clean, fast work. All the results I obtained were quite
satisfying.

As an affordably priced, Windows-based A/B-roll editing system with full features, all I can say about the
V-Station 3300 for Windows is–bravo!

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